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Medical Malpractice Attorney Arlington Heights | Medical Malpractice Kitchener

Figures released in September 2015 by the Democratic Alliance’s Gauteng shadow MEC for health and member of the provincial legislature, Jack Bloom, show that R540 million was paid out by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health as compensation for medical malpractice between 2010 and September 2015. This is money that would otherwise have been used to provide health services, Bloom says.
You all have failed to see one major issue – I for instance am a professional who has been successful for years;however do to sports was prescribed pain meds, that accidentally led to addiction… No I would not be interested in suing the initial doctors for the initial treatments; however, it is the so called rehab outpatient programs some which are very prestigious as the one I used. That first consultation led to this drug, that drug, to full blown high doses to the point if I stop I cannot work would essentially be hospitalized for a minimum a month, so you think those Doctors or places shouldn’t be sued? It has also led to extreme depression among other issues and I have never once abused my medication in treatment like the losers you speak of who take Methadone or other substances and try to mix to still get those old effects. If you all didn’t have your head in the sand you may understand. Unbelievable comments.
Not every medical error is preventable.  And despite taking every available precaution, you may still be exposed to medical error.  In the event you are harmed by a medical error, you may be concerned for your health, frightened by the possible consequences, angry at the mistake, or any combination of these and other powerful emotions.  In this state, you may not know what to do next or how to report the incident.  In the following article, InjuryBoard provides you with an easy to understand guide explaining what to do when you’re injured by a doctor’s mistake and how you can help prevent others from suffering in the same way.
Click on the name of the lawyer answering your question to see their profile, and then you can click the view website tab to find out detailed information on your personal injury topic. The information provided on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.
I'm on my 4th Psychiatrist in the same practice over the past several years. I've been diagnosed with severe anxiety, manic depression, Bipolar and even ADHD. I also see a therapist in the same office who actually happens to be a Dr., 2 of the Psychiatrists were not actual MD's. they were associates. The therapist is the reason I keep going back though, he is helpful and doesn't always agree with the medications I've been prescribed. They even had me go through 6 1/2 weeks of TMS treatment, 45 minutes a day 5 days a week.
I confess to having booked an appointment for a blood test recently and when I put it on my computer/phone forgot to set an alert. The surgery also failed to send a text reminder. Both worked this morning. GP surgeries and out-patient departments often have notices about the large number of failed appointments. In an ideal world everyone would turn up for appointments on time but few of us are perfect.
In some situations, a patient may not receive important communications due to clerical errors. In these situations, if treatment of a treatable medical condition is delayed, or made impossible because of the delay, that failure to communicate can form the basis for malpractice liability. In fact, this sort of claim is among the fastest-growing type of medical malpractice, with a quarter of all failure to diagnose claims stemming from failure to communicate claims.
Following 2003, medical malpractice insurance rates were reduced in Texas.[44][46] However, the Center for Justice & Democracy at New York Law School reports that rate reductions are likely attributable not to tort laws, but because of broader trends, such as "political pressure, the size of prior rate hikes, and the impact of the industry's economic cycle, causing rates to drop everywhere in the country." States which do not impose caps on malpractice damages, such as Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and Washington, have experienced reductions or stabilization in malpractice rates as well.[46]
A word of caution on the types of medical errors described below: Keep in mind that just because a doctor made a mistake or a patient was unhappy with a course of treatment or its outcome, that doesn't mean malpractice necessarily occurred. In order to meet the legal definition of medical malpractice, the doctor or medical provider must have been negligent in some way -- meaning the doctor was not reasonably skillful or competent, and that incompetence harmed the patient. (To learn more about what does and does not constitute medical malpractice, see Nolo's article Medical Malpractice Basics.)
That is one of the main reasons the legal system exists! To compensate people who been injured by their doctors’ mistakes! If your doctor has made a medical mistake, he may well have committed what is known in the legal community as negligence. In order to prove negligence, your attorney will have to show that (a) your doctor owed you a duty of care, (b) your doctor breached that duty of care, (c) your doctor’s breach caused you injury, and (d) you did in fact suffer an injury.

While most people think of medical malpractice claims only in terms of the clear errors, like amputating the wrong leg, or dropping a junior mint into someone’s body during surgery, it is generally much more nuanced. When a doctor fails to make an appropriate diagnosis, prescribes the wrong medication, or fails to communicate important information, malpractice claims may be possible in these situations as well.
Whether a judge will conclude the case involves professional medical negligence or simply “standard” negligence is sometimes difficult to discern ahead of time. For example, if a medical technician leaves a guardrail too loose on a patient’s bed, is that professional medical negligence or standard negligence? Different courts have answered similar questions in different ways.

Doctor Liability, Damages – In this category of cases the patient can prove that the doctor was negligent, and that negligence was the cause of the patient’s injury.  These are the situations most likely to end favorably for the injured party.  Attorneys are more likely to take cases they believe will be easy to prove.  When attorneys can easily prove physician liability, costs are lower and the client will receive more of the damage award.  In other words, less money will be deducted from the patient’s award.


Thomas J. Lavin, Esquire, has been practicing law in New York since 1984. His practice focuses primarily on protecting the rights of the injured. Mr. Lavin graduated summa cum laude from Iona College in 1979 and earned his Juris Doctor degree from St. John’s University School of Law in 1983. The Law Offices of Thomas J. Lavin have provided legal help to more than 5,000 accident victims in thirty years of personal injury practice.
Our law firm has the resources to build a strong claim for maximum damages. As our legal team prepares claims for damages, we often collaborate with experts in such areas as medicine, vocational rehabilitation and economics, as well as such specialties as neuropsychology, geriatrics, pediatrics or child development, depending on the specific circumstances of the case. In appropriate cases and with the permission and assistance of our client, our damages presentation may also include the creation of a “day-in-the-life” video to illustrate the ways in which negligent medical care has changed our client’s life. Our team goes above and beyond to demonstrate what full and fair compensation should be for our clients.
Depending on the state, the plaintiff may also be required to prove that the hospital would not have hired the doctor if an appropriate and effective screening procedure was followed. A plaintiff suing a hospital for negligently retaining a doctor will need to prove facts showing that the hospital administration knew or should have known that the doctor had become incompetent.
Certain types of serious hospital errors are totally preventable and should never occur, hence the name. Examples of never events include operating on the wrong body part, performing the wrong procedure on a patient, leaving a surgical tool in a patient or allowing a patient to develop pressure ulcers. Medicare has adopted a policy of refusing to pay for treatment that involves never events to put pressure of hospitals to do more to improve patient safety.

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Errors in treatment go hand-in-hand with diagnostic errors. If your physician negligently misdiagnoses your condition, it is likely that the treatment prescribed will also be improper. For example, if you were misdiagnosed with cancer, any prescribed chemo or radiation therapy could have a detrimental effect on your health. This error in treatment -- which is dependent upon your physician’s negligent diagnosis -- also constitutes medical negligence and malpractice.
There are special rules that apply when a patient has died, for children, and when a patient does not have full mental capacity, which your solicitor will be able to discuss with you. If you feel that you may have a clinical negligence / medical malpractice claim it is always advisable to see a solicitor as soon as possible so that they can advise on the limitation period and take steps to protect your rights to make a clinical negligence compensation claim.

Unfortunately, just because one of these things occurs does not mean you have a claim. Medicine is not an exact science, and the law does not obligate doctors to be error-free 100 percent of the time. If doctor error occurs but there is no breach of a standard of care, you may not have a strong claim. If however, doctor error occurs and there is a breach of a standard of care, then malpractice may have occurred.
You may also have suffered financial loss as a result of your GP’s negligence if, for example, the time you have been required to take off work because of your injuries or illness has been prolonged due to the negligent act or omission of your GP. Suing your doctor may seem like a daunting prospect but it does not need to be with 1st Claims. We will support you every step of the way.
The Indiana Medical Malpractice Act spells out the procedures to follow if you suspect that you have a hospital malpractice claim or any type of medical malpractice lawsuit. The first step is to obtain your medical records and have medical experts review them and determine whether the hospital or hospital staff involved in your treatment provided substandard care that caused your injury.
The concept of permitting someone to recover damages for injuries caused by someone’s lack of action or failure to do something was a revolutionary concept. Since its recognition as an action in tort, negligence has become a major source of very large jury awards. It is the root of all product liability cases. When people complain about our legal system and the outrageous verdicts being awarded nowadays, they are speaking about negligence.

Arizona lawmakers in 2012 passed a similar bill to prohibit wrongful birth lawsuits, though the legislation included exceptions in cases of an “intentional or grossly negligent act or omission.” Arizona State Sen. Nancy Barto (R-Phoenix) introduced the bill because she claimed wrongful birth lawsuits negatively affect children with disabilities. “True malpractice suits,” Barto said, would be allowed to proceed.


Prior to his presidency, Abraham Lincoln was a distinguished medical malpractice attorney, taking on cases for physicians and patients alike. Lincoln represented two defendant physicians who treated a man when a chimney fell on him. The physicians applied splints to the patient's legs, assuming he would not survive his injuries. The patient survived and was left with a crooked right leg when the splints were removed. The man recruited six attorneys, 15 physician witnesses and 21 other witnesses in his suit against the two physicians. Lincoln presented the town's only other 12 physicians. Harking to the modern statute of limitations and the importance of fresh and compelling evidence, Lincoln believed the best defense was the passage of time and so he obtained many postponements. The trial resulted in a hung jury.
Like all other tort cases, the plaintiff or their attorney files a lawsuit in a court with appropriate jurisdiction. However, unlike other tort cases, many states require that a plaintiff take specific steps before a medical malpractice lawsuit can be filed, such as providing the defendant with advance notice of intent to sue, obtaining and filing with the court a certificate of merit from a qualified medical expert who attests to the validity of the plaintiff's cause of action, submitting the claim to a panel of legal and medical experts for evaluation, or participating in mediation in an attempt to resolve the claim without litigation.[13]
This website includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. All material on this site is not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice. Contact a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal issues or problems. Receipt of information from and use of this website to contact Gilman & Bedigian or one of its lawyers does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information until an attorney-client relationship has been established.
The Syracuse medical malpractice lawyers of Michaels & Smolak have recovered millions of dollars for clients injured by medical malpractice and for other injuries to cover their medical bills, lost earnings, pain and suffering, and more. If you or a loved one has been a victim of medical malpractice, contact us for a free consultation with an experienced lawyer who can inform you of your legal rights and maximize your compensation.
* Legal aid. Legal Aid SA, a state agency that provides legal advice to those who cannot afford it, takes on medical malpractice cases selectively, depending on merit. “Our mandate permits us to fund litigation of medical malpractice and we have certainly done so in the past,” Legal Aid spokesman Mpho Phasha says. “We favour those cases where there is greatest impact, those that affect communities or where a legal principle is at stake.”
The first non-VA hospital to adopt such a program was the University of Michigan’s (U of M’s) health care system, which introduced the Michigan Model in 2001. Payments to wronged patients are made on behalf of the institution itself, so they are not reported to the National Practitioner Data Bank (such a report would affect a physician’s reputation). In this way, U of M protects its physicians and encourages them to own up to any mistakes. For more information on the Michigan Model for responding to medical errors, and how it has benefited both patients and medical professionals, click here.
For example, John Smith went to his local doctor because he had a black spot on his foot and his leg was painful.  His doctor sent him to a surgeon who suggested a special procedure using a needle inserted into his leg artery to see whether the veins in John’s foot were blocked.  The surgeon botched the procedure and John’s artery was damaged.  Several weeks later John’s leg had to be amputated.  When John consulted a lawyer and the lawyer investigated his claim, the lawyer found that John’s original foot condition was gangrene and he was always going to have to have his leg amputated, so the surgeon’s negligence in performing the procedure did not leave John worse off than he would otherwise have been and he fails the test of causation.
While some diagnostic errors may be seen as reasonable, patient harm that stems from inadequate communication could be the result of negligence on the part of medical providers. Every case is different, and the strength of yours is in the details. To have those details reviewed by an experienced medical malpractice lawyer, contact The Tinker Law Firm, PLLC. Call us today or fill out our online contact form for a free claim evaluation.

We will represent you in your medical malpractice case against a Michigan hospital under our NO FEE PROMISE. This means that you will not be charged any legal fees whatsoever unless we obtain a settlement or recovery for you. You have absolutely no obligation for legal fees unless we win your case. If we do not obtain a settlement for you, you owe us nothing!
I contacted my Gp Friday for appointment a 2 week wait. Call at 8.30 Monday for telephone consultation..called continuously from 8.30 to 9.05 . line busy. over 100 times I tried kept finger on call button theres no way other people got through only 1 line. So got to speak around 9.05 sorry all consultations are gone, try tomorrow. No place to leave comment on website, how convenient. I know NHS is stretched but theres no way that anyone got through the fone line was not busy they had it switched so could finish their coffee . I am raging
I feel when I kept having to go back and back he would of figured something else was going on as a Trauma orthopedic doctor and he didn't. Plus he neveroffered me any physical therapy. My family doctor in December ordered it for me to go one time to see what I could do. The PT said my foot was really in bad shape as far as movement. Several of his paers also contradict themselves and so I feel I did not receive proper care from him. I had surgery in March from another doctor, and now it is almost a year with this whole ordeal which could of been done if he would of investigated my problems earlier.
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In the private sector, many legal contracts of all kinds stipulate the use of mediation or arbitration in the first instance, so it is quite common. Typically, a retired judge or senior advocate presides over the matter. In mediation, he or she listens to both sides and assists the parties to reach a compromise. In arbitration, the presiding officer can impose a binding decision, and can decide whether compensation is due and if so, how much.
All this speculation about what might happen to the UK’s health services isn’t getting us anywhere. Since a high proportion of the staff in the NHS are fairly left-wing socialist sympathisers I don’t think any radical transfer of our hospitals to private companies is going to happen as any government that tried to do it would soon be out of office.
Just because your doctor or any other medical professional made a mistake about your care, it does not amount to medical malpractice. As a plaintiff (the person who brings the claim) you need to establish a few things before you can even file a medical malpractice lawsuit. If you are unsure whether or not you have grounds to make a claim, consider this:
The first element for your solicitor to prove if you are suing the NHS or a private doctor is that the medical professional or medical institution was negligent. Negligence is where the standard of medical care provided by the NHS or private hospital fell below the level expected of a professional in the field. For example, patients may be able to sue NHS hospitals because of failure to diagnose a medical condition, mistakes made in treatment such as surgery and use of improper or out of date treatment or medication.
There’s no way to tell how often doctors to lie to protect their colleagues, but ProPublica has found that patients are frequently not told the truth when they are harmed. Studies also show that many physicians do not have a favorable view of informing patients about mistakes and that health care workers are afraid to speak up if things don’t seem right. Many doctors and nurses have told ProPublica that they fear retaliation if they speak out about patient safety problems.

Loss of wages is capped at three times the Average Weekly Earnings published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.  Most injured people are not caught by this provision as it requires a gross salary of more than $140,000.00.  Claims for lost superannuation entitlements are only allowed at the compulsory employer contribution rate (currently 9% of your salary).


In order to prove medical negligence, one must show that their doctor deviated from the accepted level of medical care that could have been reasonably expected from a physician. Deviations that may support a medical malpractice claim include: surgical errors; medication errors; infections from hospitals; delayed diagnosis of cancer; cerebral palsy; paralysis; pulmonary embolus; spinal cord injury; strokes, heart attacks; brain injury; breast cancer; birth injury; tools, sponges, towels or objects left behind in your body after surgery; surgery on the wrong site; treatment without your informed consent; being given the wrong medication or the wrong dose; being treated with unsterile equipment; or a misdiagnosis or failure to diagnose a serious condition.
The stakes grew higher as damage awards grew exponentially and kept in pace with inflation. Birth injury malpractice cases between widespread as the link between blatant physician error and cerebral palsy became clear. Five of the ten highest paid claims of all time were cerebral palsy suits, for which the plaintiffs won multimillion dollar awards. Plaintiffs became entitled to both economic and noneconomic losses. Economic losses are the quantifiable monetary losses associated with the injury incurred by the defendant's negligence. Noneconomic damages are the unquantifiable emotional losses for pain, suffering and loss of enjoyment of life among other emotional hardships. As juries began to award substantial damages to injured plaintiffs, liability insurance for physicians increased. Physicians and other medical professionals passed these costs along to patients, resulting in higher costs for healthcare. Accessibility to health care was then directly affected by medical malpractice litigation. Throughout the latter half of the 20th century, many states introduced medical malpractice reform acts. Battling the question of whether to favor plaintiff or defendant, states began to impose what is known “damage caps,” which very widely between each state. Damage caps limit the amount of money a plaintiff can collect should they win their malpractice case. Some states impose no limit at all because such limitations are constitutionally prohibited. Other states have taken a long, hard look at the question of damage caps, assessing what numerical figure does not deprive the plaintiff of rightful compensation and is not unjustly punitive to the defendant. The lowest caps sit in the neighborhood $250,000, while the highest caps are in the neighborhood of $2.5 million. A handful of states adopted the use of a medical malpractice fund, to which all physicians in that state must contribute. The fund will pay damages in medical malpractice claims after the physician's insurance covers the first $1 million. This way, physicians need only insurance that covers up to $1 million dollars and no more. This is meant to bring down insurance premiums for medical professionals. To a minor extent, damage caps influence the state a medical professional will choose to practice in, although it is not a huge bearing in their decision. Some states allow for punitive damages, which must be paid by the defendant as punishment but which are not awarded to the plaintiff.

Various studies have shown that the Texas tort-reform law has had no effect on healthcare costs or the number of physicians practicing in the state.[45] A February 2014 study found "no evidence to support" the claim that "there had been a dramatic increase in physicians moving to Texas due to the improved liability climate."[47] The study found that this is true "for all patient care physicians in Texas, high-malpractice-risk specialties, primary care physicians, and rural physicians.[47]
Medical malpractice is not dependent on a poor result, and a poor result does not always constitute negligence. The practice of medicine is an inexact art, and there are no guarantees that any course of treatment. But doctors do make mistakes, and some of those mistakes rise to the level of medical malpractice. So what, exactly, constitutes negligent treatment by a physician?
You're extremely confident in your opinion. Have you considered the possibility that neither of you is interpreting reality on an objective level and that you are actually harming your son based on that absolutism? Saying that it's 100% true seems a bit off unless you have a photographic memory, especially when you think that they believe every word of his and are doing the wrong thing.
A four-year statute of repose applies to claims arising out of acts or omissions on or after April 11, 2003. A claim must be brought within four years of the act or omission, except that a claimant has one full year from discovery, even if this exceeds four years, for claims discovered after three years or claims based on a foreign object left in the body only. Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2305.113
It doesn’t matter that “addiction” can be either physical or psychologic and that there is no reliable way to determine when addiction occurs. Tick’s bill doesn’t define addiction. It also doesn’t matter that people can get addicted to pretty much anything … alcohol, illegal drugs, porn, gambling, even collecting Cabbage Patch Kids. Tick’s bill only cares about those evil doctors. Beware internet service providers, you could be next on the list if your subscribers get addicted to the internet.
We'll see what ends up happening on retrial, but I thought this was an interesting emerging area of law. What if the issue wasn't technical incompetence? How much "personal background" should a doctor have to tell a patient before treatment can begin? Medical school grades? Failure to pay income tax? Should doctors be required to disclose to patients the fact that they've been treated for mental illness themselves?
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