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Medical Malpractice Arizona | Medical Malpractice Attorney Schaumburg

A doctor cannot terminate care of a patient when the patient is at a critical stage of treatment, solely because the patient is unable to pay for the care. However, if the patient is in a stable condition and is given ample warning of the termination, a doctor may be able to stop treatment. For example, in a 1989 case in Iowa called Surgical Consultants, P.C. v. Ball, a patient had gastric bypass surgery and suffered abscesses afterwards. She sought treatment from the operating physician, who saw her 11 times post-surgery but then refused to continue seeing her because she had not paid her bill. This was not considered abandonment because the patient was not considered to be at a critical stage of treatment.
Still, in a few cases, it is possible to say that the doctor or other medical professional acted so poorly that their behavior was actually criminal. The most common instances are those in which doctors or other medical professionals issue prescriptions to patients in dosages that they know, or should know, could be dangerous. An example of such a prosecution was the doctor who prescribed pain medications to famed pop singer, Michael Jackson. Other examples of criminal misconduct by doctors include surgeons attempting procedures while impaired by drugs or alcohol, or so-called “pill mills” that prescribe medications in volumes that could only be used for illegal distribution.
This is where a “Pain Management” doctor should potentially be liable (your avg. doc should not – but those specially trained in this area have NO EXCUSE for this kind of mis-treatment of a patient with a solid history). This is all well documented, there is no valid excuse in forcing patients into withdrawl and destroying a weeks or more of their life (or their lives entirely in many cases) – the impact to your family and job are tremendous. It is exactly this kind of poor practice that leads people down the wrong path to things like heroin. I was fortunate and toughed it out (my wife was very supportive), having the new meds (though not effective enough to control my pain 24/7) was better than nothing but the withdrawal ..was ..terrible AND unnecessary.
For instance, a boy named William Parr was born with a lump in his leg that was diagnosed as a tumor when he was eight years old. Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital performed a procedure to remove it. But a complication occurred during the procedure that resulted in a burn, which caused significant pain, refused to heal and became infected. The medical team tried for some time to fix the problem, but eventually the boy’s leg had to be amputated.
It is possible, however, to commit a criminal homicide based on wanton or reckless behavior. In other words, if someone acts with such disregard for the safety of others that death or serious injury is almost a given, this is often enough for certain types of criminal charges. However, doctors and other medical professionals are highly trained, very knowledgeable individuals. They are heavily regulated to prevent those with serious problems like substance abuse or mental disorders from causing harm. They are also under constant scrutiny and required to undergo continuing education to ensure that they are not engaging in techniques that could imperil a patient's life.
So, the lawyer sues the doctor. The doctor being sued has malpractice insurance (most states won’t allow you to practice without it). So the insurance company pays for a lawyer to defend the doctor, as well as an expert witness to evaluate the case and attest that there was no malpractice. Notice that the patient’s lawyer still hasn’t spent any money. The doctor’s insurance company has spent a lot of money on expert witnesses and lawyers.
Our law firm has the resources to build a strong claim for maximum damages. As our legal team prepares claims for damages, we often collaborate with experts in such areas as medicine, vocational rehabilitation and economics, as well as such specialties as neuropsychology, geriatrics, pediatrics or child development, depending on the specific circumstances of the case. In appropriate cases and with the permission and assistance of our client, our damages presentation may also include the creation of a “day-in-the-life” video to illustrate the ways in which negligent medical care has changed our client’s life. Our team goes above and beyond to demonstrate what full and fair compensation should be for our clients.
GOOD LUCK getting THEM to write you a prescription for a highly addictive drug, betting none of their patients will abuse it and then try to destroy them, for their kindness. If you think surgery is expensive in this country, just wait until you see the price of pain management, in a society full of overgrown children who believe that every mistake they make is somebody elses’ fault. By siding with the abuser, juries have no idea how painful a mistake they are making for themselves. Chronic pain comes to almost all of us in time, but in the future, relief from it may only be found on the streets at 30 times the cost, and risking prison to get it.
Battery occurs when a person intentionally touches or has other unwelcome physical contact with another person in a harmful or offensive manner. Battery may apply when patients are sexually or physically abused by their doctors. This can also occur when a doctor performs an incorrect surgery or medical treatment on the patient. Likewise, this can occur when a doctor does something to the patient without consent.
The doctor acted negligently. The doctor acted negligently if the doctor failed to ask you certain questions, forgot to send the blood test to the proper lab, gave a fake name for your illness and other practices which a similar doctor with the same experience would never have done. To prove this, you will have to show that a reasonable doctor would have recognized your medical problem from your symptoms and diagnosed you appropriately.
A number of general practices seem to be having difficulty retaining GP’s but for all of them at one surgery to resign and not be replaced by permanent doctors is very unusual, although perhaps recruitment is under way. The NHS Primary Care Commissioning Group for your area is responsible for the provision of general practices sufficient for the needs of the population and for the proper management of the services, but these Groups tend to be difficult to contact and engage with. Local newspapers are sometimes able to get information and relay this to local residents and some PCCG’s will issue statements but they are not noted for their openness. Your PCCG might have a website giving information on the current position and what it is doing about it. There could be malpractice issues at the root of what has happened in your area. The NHS is a branch of national government so I suggest you contact your Member of Parliament as the person most likely to be able find out the facts, inform constituents, and press for early resolution of whatever problem has caused this situation to develop. Local councillors can also apply pressure but the NHS is not under any obligation to answer to them in the same way as it is accountable to MP’s.
Cavendish ruled that a physician could be held liable if and when they harmed a patient as a result of negligence while stipulating that a physician who diligently adhered to the standard of care would not be liable even if he accomplished no cure. A legal precursor to expert testimony came in 1532, when a law passed under the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, requiring the opinion of medical men to be taken in cases of violent death. In 1768, Sir William Blackstone penned Commentaries on the Laws of England, in which he recruited the Latin term “mala praxis” to describe the concept of professional negligence, or ‘tort' in modern parlance. Blackstone noted that mala praxis “breaks the trust which the party had placed in his physician, and tends to the patient's destruction.” The proper term of ‘malpractice' was coined sometime thereafter, deriving from Blackstone's work.
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld

Your attorney can help you determine whether you were the victim of  medical malpractice. Attorneys conduct independent medical research with the assistance of physicians and nurses to determine whether medical negligence occurred. A poor medical outcome alone does not automatically mean medical malpractice was committed. In order to receive compensation, you must prove that the defendant failed to provide reasonable care. Please feel free to call usanytime for free a consultation to help you get your questions answered.

Being unhappy with your treatment or the results of that treatment does not mean the doctor is liable or guilty of medical malpractice. The doctor must have been negligent in connection with your diagnosis or treatment. To sue for malpractice, you must be able to show that the doctor caused you harm in a way that a competent doctor would not have if they were treating you under the same circumstances. The doctor’s care is not required to be the best possible, merely “reasonably skillful and careful”. Whether the doctor was reasonably skillful and careful is often at the heart of a medical malpractice claim.
I am 7 1/2 months pregnant and was put on methadone about 2 1/2 months ago at the hospital. Then my old doctor started prescribing me my methadone. I had to go back to the hospital last week and they gave me meds while there. Now my doctor is dropping me as a patient because I got meds from the hospspital.  At this point, I have no one to prescribe my meds because I get afford the hospital clinic anymore. If I don't have them I was told that there is 50% chance my baby will die. And now my OBGYN says that if I don't get my meth they will drop me as a patient and I will have no one to care for me.
After meeting the notice requirements and other prerequisites, depending upon the jurisdiction an injured patient may be able to file a lawsuit against the doctor. In order to prove the doctor negligent and that he or she committed malpractice, the accident victim must first be able to show that the doctor breached the duty of care owed to the patient.
According to a study by the Department of Health and Human Service's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that one in ten patients that die within 90 days of a surgery are killed because of a preventable error. When medical malpractice occurs, not only are patients' lives adversely affected, so are their pocket books. According to the Department of Health and Human Service's study:
In order to take legal action against a medical doctor for malpractice, you cannot just simply file a lawsuit with the court. Rather, you must first send a notice to the doctor, indicating to him or her that you are planning to file a lawsuit for medical malpractice. After filing the notice, there may be a waiting period before the injured patient is eligible to file a lawsuit.
Once a doctor initiates treatment of a patient, the doctor must not only terminate care at a proper time, but also in a proper manner. If a doctor transfers a patient to the care of a second doctor, the second doctor may not be familiar with crucial details of a patient's care. So, the first doctor has an ongoing obligation to provide the second doctor with proper instructions and all relevant records (treatment notes, test results, etc.). Failure to do so could rise to the level of medical malpractice.
Now I find myself with a new doctor that is scared of the DEA – they have prosecuted tons of doctors at this point and this new doctor wants to do nothing but cover her butt. So she takes_me_off_the_meds_I’ve_been _stable_on_for_9_years ….. and switches me to 2x long-acting (12 hrs – yeah try 8..) “crush-resistant” (aka – take it 1.5 hrs before you need relief or your previous dose wears off – whatever comes first) pills with some reasonable break thru meds…
Your attorney should also disclose “bad facts” in the opening statement.[20] A bad fact is anything the defense would want to bring to the jury’s attention because it makes the defense case much stronger. For example, your failure to follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment is a bad fact. By disclosing bad facts first, your attorney can take the sting out of them.

Doctors must abide by what is called “the duty of informed consent”. This means that a doctor is obligated by law and by professional ethics to warn patients of all known risks of a procedure or course of treatment. If a patient who had been properly informed of risks and potential side-effects would have elected not to proceed, the doctor MAY be liable for medical malpractice. Similarly, if the patient is injured by the procedure – or during the course of treatment – in a way that the doctor should have warned could happen but didn’t, the doctor may be liable for medical malpractice.
I see why malpractice insurance is high. I think in many cases it's the attitude that goes along with the malpractice that leads to legal action being taken. I understand that that's not always the case, and sometimes it is simply an accident. However, I know in my family's situation had there been even a tiny morsel of remorse by the physician who treated my grandfather he wouldn't have had to travel to the state capitol. Misreading the fuzzy xray may have been an accident, but sending my grandfather home unable to walk or care for himself, in terrible pain with no pain medication for his broken hip was not an accident. We didn't profit from it, but the physician did have to get an attorney/attorneys when he faced the medical board - so you can blame people like him for the increase in your rates. Had he said he was sorry and not been such an a-- to my grandfather he wouldn't have had to go try to defend himself. He lost, by the way. Had to pay a fine and take some classes. He probably deserved more than he got, but it was something.
And don’t kid yourself. If you think that your doctor just made a mistake and that it won’t happen again – think again. Chances are, if he made a mistake with you, he very well could have done it before and will do it again. Don’t be dissuaded by your doctor’s apologies or his downplaying of your injuries. An apology won’t pay for your medical expenses, and it certainly doesn’t ensure that he realizes the full consequences of his negligible actions.
For more than 30 years, Hodes Milman has provided families and individuals experienced, trusted and compassionate legal representation when they've been injured by another's carelessness or negligence. As a team of personal injury and product liability attorneys, Hodes Milman provides focused expertise to build a strategic case against negligent, injurious and willful offenders.
It is not easy to get a full picture of the increase in medical malpractice cases in South Africa, as there is no central register. Cases can be settled in court, out of court or via mediation. If matters are settled out of court or via mediation, there is no public record of compensation. However, if all sources of information are collated, it would certainly appear that both the number and levels of claims are increasing, and this is affecting the overall cost of health care in the country, including what you pay for medical scheme cover.
Chris Archer, the chief executive of South African Private Practitioners Forum, says it is fashionable for health practitioners to blame lawyers for the increase in malpractice cases, but the working conditions of many health professionals also play a role. “Many health professionals work in solo practices or small partnerships without professional support or routine peer review. There is limited use of protocols and guidelines and little to no teamwork among private practitioners,” he says.

Medical malpractice is not dependent on a poor result, and a poor result does not always constitute negligence. The practice of medicine is an inexact art, and there are no guarantees that any course of treatment. But doctors do make mistakes, and some of those mistakes rise to the level of medical malpractice. So what, exactly, constitutes negligent treatment by a physician?
“We comply, where applicable, with the SRA Code of Conduct 2011 published by the Solicitors Regulation Authority, and any solicitor [or registered European lawyer] to whom we may refer you is an independent professional from whom you will receive impartial and confidential advice. You are free to choose another solicitor [or registered European lawyer]"
“A significant problem with the court process, as it stands, is the determination of life expectancy (especially with babies), which is fraught with difficulties. Parents may receive too much or too little compensation; causing strain for the system or unnecessary financial duress for parents. Medical expense awards are also estimated at private-patient rates (as much as 50 percent higher than medical scheme rates) – unnecessarily so, as most patients have medical scheme membership, with an already agreed, reasonable tariff,” Kellerman says.
^ Faulty Data and False Conclusions: The Myth of Skyrocketing Medical Malpractice Verdicts, Lewis L. Laska, J.D., Ph.D. and Katherine Forrest, M.D., M.P.H. Commonweal Institute, October 6, 2004. From the report, "The premise that medical malpractice awards have been rising dramatically in the United States in recent years, driving up the cost of healthcare and forcing physicians out of practice, is not supported by relevant evidence."
An average person does not know how to correctly file a report against a doctor who has committed medical malpractice.  Further complicating matters is the fact that each state has its own procedure for filing complaints against physicians.  Generally, you should file the complaint with your state’s medical board.  Each state has its own medical board and its own forms and requirements for filing complaints against doctors.
At my GP surgery I’m pretty sure half the battle is wether the receptionist thinks your exaggerating ! A few months back I caught flu from my daughter, after a week the fever, headache and severe cough hadn’t subsided. I have asthma so knew it was a good idea to call to be sure I didn’t have a chest infection. I managed to be granted a telephone consultation with the nurse who oodly prescribed a nose spray thinking the head pain was actually my sinus’s (never had sinus issues) a week on no change but the cough was horrific with all sorts coming up. Called again got a telephone consultation with GP, he prescribed a low dose of antibiotic an said it’s most likely viral. 1 week on after feeling slight relief I started feeling extreemly wheezy with not much change to the cough. The 2nd day I called I demanded to see someone as I couldn’t see how my chest could be Assesed over the phone. Then I got an appointment with the nurse at the minor ailments clinic(minor difficulty breathing) I was straight away placed on a nebulizer, my sats were low and nurse said I had pneumonia. A month later still not feeling quite right my asthma meds were increased. 1 month on again another course of steroids and then they agreed I probably should have an xray. 5 hrs late they call saying I need a ct scan but will have to be in a waiting list. All this caused me severe anxiety and when I saw a dr and broke down he literally made me feel a complete waste of time. Since I’ve felt awful but am too embarrassed to go back so have to hope this is all just anxiety. As soon as my referals through I’ll be leaving that surgery as I have zero confidence in them
That said, medical professionals such as Doctors rightly hold a position of respect, value and authority in our society, so when they have failed to fulfil the high standards expected of them, it can be difficult to know what to do. The health and wellbeing of you or a loved one may have been adversely affected, and without medical knowledge, it can often be difficult to know whether the negative impacts suffered were unavoidable or whether they classify as negligent, and you should, therefore, report your Doctor.

The second main component of your case will be the establishment of medical malpractice  damages. To sue the doctor, it’s not enough that he or she failed to treat or diagnose a disease or injury in time; it must also have caused additional injury. That means showing exactly how -- and to what extent -- the delay in the provision of medical care harmed you. This will also usually require the testimony of an expert medical witness.
The injured patient must show that the physician acted negligently in rendering care, and that such negligence resulted in injury. To do so, four legal elements must be proven: (1) a professional duty owed to the patient; (2) breach of such duty; (3) injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages. This includes doing nothing when they should have done something. This may be considered an act of omission or a negligence.
People have a tendency to downplay their injuries because they do not want to be seen by others as complaining or needy. In fact, those that are more severely injured tend to downplay their injuries the most. Before you are convinced that your injuries don’t warrant some type of compensation, it is best to be examined by an independent medical expert. You may be entitled to lost wages, medical expenses, or compensation for pain and suffering.
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