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Medical Malpractice Crisis | Medical Malpractice Basics

A violation of the standard of care - The law acknowledges that there are certain medical standards that are recognized by the profession as being acceptable medical treatment by reasonably prudent health care professionals under like or similar circumstances. This is known as the standard of care. A patient has the right to expect that health care professionals will deliver care that is consistent with these standards. If it is determined that the standard of care has not been met, then negligence may be established.
I'm on my 4th Psychiatrist in the same practice over the past several years. I've been diagnosed with severe anxiety, manic depression, Bipolar and even ADHD. I also see a therapist in the same office who actually happens to be a Dr., 2 of the Psychiatrists were not actual MD's. they were associates. The therapist is the reason I keep going back though, he is helpful and doesn't always agree with the medications I've been prescribed. They even had me go through 6 1/2 weeks of TMS treatment, 45 minutes a day 5 days a week.

They can easily get away with anything while hiding behind "confidentiality/patient privacy." They can also be knuckleheads because there is no agreement , consensus or strict definition of the various conditions. They can make any statement sounds nuts. I agree with taping (but the client keeps the tapes) and if the shrink objects, find someone else.
While some medical errors are readily apparent, many times a serious hospital error is not immediately obvious. You may have a suspicion that you or your loved one has been harmed by a hospital’s substandard care. In most instances, you will need to have your medical records reviewed by independent medical experts to determine whether a preventable hospital error occurred.
pauline- the official line and the one I was forced to travel as part of NHS diversification is that you MUST visit an optician ,not necessarily the one you have been attending . Get an eye test and if they find anything wrong with your eyes that they as opticians cant sort they will recommend you to an NHS eye clinic . They will send you an appointment card to attend hospital and do tests on your eyes , this might take several visits but then they will advise the next NHS treatment . I should know I went through all that and still attend . So dont start with a GP appointment you will only be told to visit an optician ,once the optician sends in his report they MUST act -full stop !
The situation is different for patients injured in an emergency room. Usually, the hospital does not have an opportunity to inform emergency room patients that a doctor is not an employee. This means that ER patients can often sue the hospital for a doctor's medical malpractice. There are also a few states that say a hospital can be sued for emergency room malpractice regardless of what the patient believed or was told. (To learn more, read Nolo's article Medical Malpractice During Emergencies.)
To have a valid hospital negligence claim, it must be shown that the level of care provided to the victim fell below a reasonable standard. Additionally, a successful medical malpractice claim must prove causation. This means that the link between the substandard care and the victim’s injury or death must be clearly demonstrated. Due to the multifaceted and complex nature of medical malpractice claims, it is important to hire a lawyer with extensive experience and resources related to this area of law. A positive outcome often relies on the ability and knowledge of your legal team. At Hodes Milman, our lawyers have helped countless victims, and we can help you understand and assert your rights.
The "medical standard of care" is a legal concept that refers to the type and amount of care that a similarly-skilled and trained doctor would have provided under the circumstances. In abandonment cases, standard of care basically boils down to the question, "Would a reasonable doctor have terminated the doctor-patient relationship at the same point in treatment, and in the same way?"
The 18th and 19th centuries saw an ebb and flow between patients and physicians respective rights in the area of medical liability, alternating who held the upper hand. One of the first courses of action was defining the emerging concept of ‘standard' or 'duty of care.' Both standard of care and the logical foundation of ‘expert testimony' are derived from the notion that there is a professional custom. This means the standard of care a physician owes the patient is not necessarily defined by a common rationale or legal sensibility, but by what other physicians deem “customary” for their profession. Therefore, other medical professionals must agree that a defendant professional “contravened customary practice” in order to constitute legal transgression. This allowed medical professionals to set the legal standard for their own behavior. They were bound to a standard of care because they practiced a 'common calling' and possessed a supposed shared knowledge of best practices. In early British common law, this principle was contained in the 'rule of locality,' which held that physicians were bound to their self-set standard, but only by those professionals within their geographic region, or "locality." This has evolved, where modern law does not esteem geographic locality but requires that all medical professionals in the same practice area be bound to the same standard. Only a physician in the same practice area may judge that another professional has breached the standard of care in that profession. A 1769 lawsuit in England, Slater v. Baker set about defining the standard by which a physician's conduct could be measured and compared, while still enforcing the arbitrary requirement that a physician may only be found liable if a fellow physician from the defendant's same geographic region found that the standard of care was breached. The locality rule with regards to geography was eventually scrapped in Anglo-American law, but the locality of practice area remained intact.
Although this may sound like “tough love”, if you feel that you need or want to bring suit against your doctor because he or she injured you or a loved one, and your family or friends are giving your grief about it, maybe it’s time to think about whether they really have your best interests at heart. If bringing suit is something you feel that you need to do to pay for lost wages, medical bills, pain and suffering, or just to regain some sense of control over the situation, your good friends and family will eventually come to understand and stick by your side.
The injured patient must show that the physician acted negligently in rendering care, and that such negligence resulted in injury. To do so, four legal elements must be proven: (1) a professional duty owed to the patient; (2) breach of such duty; (3) injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages. This includes doing nothing when they should have done something. This may be considered an act of omission or a negligence.
Many medical procedures are inherently risky and even under the most expert care can have bad outcomes. In these cases, doctors are obliged to explain the possible risks of a procedure to you before the procedure, and you must give your informed consent. Doctors need to have efficient and accurate record-keeping processes in order to defend themselves from malpractice litigation. Absent or poor record keeping is classified as professional negligence.
Furthermore, we all inform our patients to some degree about the risks and benefits of procedures, meds, etc. Never have I heard that one's own track record or disciplinary history should be included. And in this case we don't for what the doc was disciplined or what led to the death. It may or may not have been relevant to Willis. The real issue here is whether he failed to warn her of the possibility of the perforation. The only thing going for the plaintiff here is that she likely claims that she would have chosen a different surgeon had she known the truth. Easy to say in retrospect when plaintiff and attorneys stand to gain $$. And apparently the same complication could as easily have occurred with a different surgeon anyway.
Losing a loved one is never easy, especially when the loss could have been avoided. Often in cases of medical malpractice, those who are left behind after a loved one's passing wonder why the doctor is not going to jail for murder. Is it possible for one to charge a doctor with murder when their treatment of a patient was so poor as to result in death?

The 1960's and 1970's also saw the emergence of the doctrine of informed consent. Modern medicine requires that medical professionals disclose all of the associated risks that accompany a given procedure. This way, if a treatment or procedure entails serious or deterrent risk, the patient may make an informed personal decision to refuse it, such is their right. During these two decades, it became a fundamental tenant of biomedical ethics that a patient is informed of all the risks in a procedure. Failure to warn patients of possible adverse outcomes could become an additional source of liability for physicians and medical professionals. Legislatures eventually got down to the task of explicitly defining what information must be disclosed, and what constitute a "lack" of informed consent. The definition tiptoed around the issues of emergency care, patient-provider relationships, “common” knowledge, consent on behalf of a minor, and whether a given risk would deter a “reasonable” person from accepting treatment. Lawmakers set about drafting ironclad informed consent law that covered the ifs, ands and buts of most conceivable situations that required informed medical consent. In the same era, courts discarded the doctrine of charitable immunity which had previously immunized charitable institutions from suit.
Many people are shocked to learn that doctors and hospitals frequently fail to disclose important information to patients, sometimes intentionally. Sometimes the failure to disclose info relates to mistakes a doctor or hospital made, sometimes it’s about test results, and sometimes doctors are just trying to prevent needless worrying. However, if a patient is harmed or injured as a result of a doctor or hospital’s failure to communicate medical information, such as test results, then they may be liable for malpractice.
@ Anon, since when do we not ask lawyers about their success rates?! I don't have much experience with the legal system, but to the best of my knowledge, most people research a lawyer before hiring them. I've never hired a lawyer, but if I needed legal representation, I'd certainly find out what kind of experience and success a lawyer had before asking them to represent me! (It may be somewhat less if it's a lawyer that takes the case on contingency, but then you at least have the guarantee that they're really motivated to win.)
Under Ohio law, a medical malpractice lawsuit must be filed within one year from the later of one of two dates. This is known as the statute of limitations. Those dates are (1) when you discover the injury or (2) from the last date of treatment with the negligent medical provider. There are exceptions to this rule. Therefore, if you think you or a loved one has suffered due to medical malpractice it is imperative that you contact us at your earliest possible convenience so that we can provide you with an opinion as to whether or not you have a potential medical negligence claim. If a loved one has passed away due to medical negligence the family has a separate claim known as a wrongful death lawsuit. This is subject to a two year statute of limitations from the date of death.
Incidentally, even when I was one week out of school if a patient asked when I graduated I told them the truth. Early on I did see an occasional look of fear at learning I was a newbie, but none of them asked for someone else. However, if they had asked for someone else that would have been their right and I would have respected their wishes. It's their money, their body, and their decision.
Once the complaint has been filed, pre-trial preparation begins with the discovery period. The discovery of facts is often accomplished in 2 different ways: interrogatories and depositions. Interrogatories are questionnaires that witnesses fill out and are typically used for gathering preliminary details. Depositions are face-to-face interviews in which witnesses are sworn in and transcripts of the interviews are transcribed, but they do afford the attorneys the opportunity to ask follow-up questions and gather more in-depth information.

Why is it important to differentiate between malpractice and simply poor doctoring? Because in a successful malpractice case, the patient can recover money damages to compensate for injury, including emotional harm. Alternatives to a malpractice lawsuit include filing a human rights complaint, filing a complaint with the psychiatrist’s employer, filing an ethics charge against the psychiatrist, writing negative online reviews for the psychiatrist, or speaking with the psychiatrist directly. However, these alternatives will not provide recompense to the patient for any harm inflicted.


A case can be opened only if the alleged malpractice happened less than three years previously. There are a few exceptions to this general rule. If the injured party was under 18 at the time of the incident and his or her parents failed to seek compensation on behalf of the child, on turning 18, the child has one year to seek compensation on his or her own account. An injured party suffering from a mental illness has three years to make a claim on recovery from this illness. Exceptions might also be made if the injured party was compelled to be outside South Africa during the three-year intervening period.


Filing a complaint against a doctor with your state’s medical board is usually the first step in bringing disciplinary action against a doctor. Although the particulars vary by state, when the board receives complaints against doctors, it enters them into a system. The board then reviews complaints or refers them to another agency if needed. The medical board may ask to see medical records. If you complain about a doctor, the medical board will not disclose your identity.
Once the claimant has satisfied the pre-suit investigation and notice requirements, the claimant may be able to file a medical malpractice lawsuit in the Florida court system. In order to prevail in a medical negligence case against a doctor, the claimant has the burden of proof. This burden may be difficult to meet, given that there is often a presumption that the doctor acted reasonably and properly under the circumstances.
Battery occurs when a person intentionally touches or has other unwelcome physical contact with another person in a harmful or offensive manner. Battery may apply when patients are sexually or physically abused by their doctors. This can also occur when a doctor performs an incorrect surgery or medical treatment on the patient. Likewise, this can occur when a doctor does something to the patient without consent.
The number of hospital mistakes responsible for serious but non-fatal injuries is even higher. In the state of New York, can a medical malpractice law firm help you seek legal recourse if you are injured while you’re receiving care or treatment in a hospital? For those seeking justice in this state, the answer is yes. Hospital negligence leading to severe injury or death includes malpractice by doctors, nurses, physician’s assistants, nurse’s aides, and even technicians who work for the hospital.
I would be very surprised to learn that a “specialist” had no experience in a common GI disorder or was unable to do more than send you away. However, I do not have enough facts to determine whether this doctor complied with the standard of care or whether you were harmed by a failure to comply with the standard of care. Another GI specialist can speak to the standard of care. A lawyer can determine whether you’ve suffered compensable harm. Request all of you medical records, ask your current GI if this was a breach and see a lawyer if the answer is “Yes.”
This is a crucial determination. Just because medical negligence occurred at a hospital, it doesn't necessarily follow that the facility itself can be held responsible. If your case is based on sub-standard care provided by an individual doctor, and that doctor is an independent contractor (and not an employee of the hospital), you need to pursue action against the doctor him/herself. In many cases, you can't sue a hospital for a doctor's treatment error, unless the doctor is an employee of the hospital (most are not), or when the doctor's incompetence should have been obvious to the hospital.
In the wake of a medical malpractice accident, you should hire a personal injury attorney so he/she can determine if somebody negligently provided medical care to you and who can determine what injuries were caused as a result. If a personal injury attorney determines that medical malpractice did occur, a lawsuit can be filed. One of the most important things that you can do is to take pictures of any things that don't look right- such as cuts or abrasions. You can also gather all hospital records, request more medical documentation from a hospital and research a doctor's medical track record. Keep a journal to record the medical malpractice incident, your injuries and follow-up care.
It doesn’t matter that “addiction” can be either physical or psychologic and that there is no reliable way to determine when addiction occurs. Tick’s bill doesn’t define addiction. It also doesn’t matter that people can get addicted to pretty much anything … alcohol, illegal drugs, porn, gambling, even collecting Cabbage Patch Kids. Tick’s bill only cares about those evil doctors. Beware internet service providers, you could be next on the list if your subscribers get addicted to the internet.
Some medical malpractice claims arise from mistakes made in the operating room. A surgeon might be negligent during the operation itself (puncturing internal organs, operating on the wrong body part, or leaving surgical instruments in the body) or the nursing staff might be negligent in administering post-op care (which could result in complications like serious infection).
Doctor Liability, Damages Are Small – Some states have enacted tort reforms that apply caps to the amount of money an injured patient can recover from a medical malpractice claim.  Under these caps, a patient may only be entitled to a $250,000 verdict.  While this amount of money may seem large, the patient must share that money with expert witnesses, investigators, and attorneys.  In the end, the patient’s financial recovery may be slight.  Attorneys may hesitate to take a case if it seems like the recovery will be negligible.  However, some patients are more concerned with filing suit as a matter of principle than as a means of financial recovery.  Sometimes lawyers are willing to take a case to help the client make such a statement.
The South Dakota surgeon had been called to vouch for the expertise of one of his partners whose patient had suffered a stroke and permanent disability after an operation. The problem was Aanning had, in his own mind, questioned his colleague’s skill. His partner’s patients had suffered injuries related to his procedures. But Aanning understood why his partner’s attorney had called him as a witness: Doctors don’t squeal on doctors.
In order to establish negligence and sue the NHS, your solicitor will need to obtain expert evidence from a medical expert in the relevant medical field. So, if your claim is against a GP then normally your solicitor will obtain expert evidence from another GP. An experienced solicitor will know suitable and highly respected medical practitioners in numerous areas of specialty who are able to serve as a medical expert. The medical expert will review your medical records and in most cases needs to give you a medical examination before preparing his or her report.
Army Medical Malpractice Cancer $701,790 received by clients $250,000 attorneys' fees $48,209 litigation expenses Owen v. United States Darnall Army Community Hospital Our client underwent surgery at the U.S. Army MEDDAC in Nuremberg, Germany. Following surgery, our client transferred her care to DACH. Despite pathology results that revealed cancer, Ft.
Experience: All attorneys are not created equal. Many attorneys today work as general practice attorneys, meaning they handle all types of cases from criminal matters to civil suits. However, if you have experienced a case of medical negligence, it is important to have an attorney who specializes in medical malpractice. You do not want a lawyer whose first trial is going to be this case. Even attorneys who specialize in civil matters rarely go to court, as many of their cases settle without a trial. At The O’Keefe Firm, Stephen O’Keefe has had years of actual trial experience specializing in medical malpractice cases. Although your case may be resolved without stepping into the courtroom, you can be assured that Mr. O’Keefe has the trial experience necessary to fight for your rights in front of a jury.
The first non-VA hospital to adopt such a program was the University of Michigan’s (U of M’s) health care system, which introduced the Michigan Model in 2001. Payments to wronged patients are made on behalf of the institution itself, so they are not reported to the National Practitioner Data Bank (such a report would affect a physician’s reputation). In this way, U of M protects its physicians and encourages them to own up to any mistakes. For more information on the Michigan Model for responding to medical errors, and how it has benefited both patients and medical professionals, click here.
The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals disagreed, stating that “true consent to what happens to one’s self is the informed exercise of a choice, and that entails an opportunity to evaluate knowledgeably the options available and the risks attendant upon each … it is the prerogative of the patient, not the physician, to determine for himself the direction in which his interests seem to lie.”
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