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Medical Malpractice How Much Is My Case Worth | Medical Malpractice Attorney Chicago Heights

The most common complaint, when these conflicts arise, is that people feel like they’re not being heard or understood, says George Blackall, PsyD, author of Breaking the Cycle: How to Turn Conflict Into Collaboration When You and Your Patients Disagree and professor of pediatrics and humanities at Penn State University College of Medicine in Hershey, Pa.
I am a cancer patient at a very large cancer center in FL – I have been treated in their palliative pain department for over 3 years due to pain caused from nerve damage in surgeries/lymphedema/ and a chronic pain condition of the lower extremities. I argued with my dr. about the constant increase in my pain meds – i did not want them to increase, but was told that was the only way to manage the pain I was in. After a few months, I relented. 3 years later, Im labeled a “stable” patient and released from the cancer center to find a community dr. I was told that since my cancer was now in remission and my pain under control, they needed to tend to more needy patients. OK. I could not find any “legal” doctor to see me for pain management. The ones i found were either asking for lots of $$$ up front (no thank you) or only helping patients with injections or spinal surgeries. I finally found a DR. who agreed to help me – ween off the pain meds only – because he did not want me to be forced to go cold turkey off the dosages i was on. Fine by me.
More often that not, however, a claim will fail on the fourth element, because Judges have a hard time believing that someone who has gone to a doctor with a problem would not accept the doctor’s recommended solution.  People take risks every day – risks involving being in a car, crossing the street, taking pain killers, agreeing to medical procedures. A savvy doctor who is being sued for failing to warn will trawl through your past and look for behaviour that evidences your particular tendency to take risks and will try to use it against you to defeat your claim.  A good medical negligence lawyer Sydney would have taken you through all that before you decide to sue so that you know whether or not you are likely to win a failure to warn claim.
I tried to make an appointment with my GP only to be told I couldn’t get in to to see one for five weeks I couldn’t help but laugh. She said if it’s an emergency the doctor could ring me back so i explained to the receptionists my problem and she classed it an emergency appointment . So I waited all day with my phone next to me only to have a phone call from the receptionists to say the doctor had been called out on an emergency and would call me back in the morning. So all day I waited yet again for a phone call from the doctor, eventually the next day I received a missed call at 6.50 in the evening with a message from my GP apologising for the delay , and could I ring the following morning to see if I can get in because it’s clear I need to see a doctor. I do understand doctors are really busy but to me this is ridiculous . So I have now decided to. Change to a different doctors surgery which is a real shame because I’ve been at this surgery for 25 years.
Research indicates that communication problems are a factor in up to 80 percent of medical malpractice cases. One study concluded that physicians did not acknowledge 36 percent of abnormal radiologic results. Another study found that 17-32 percent of physicians reported having no reliable method for ensuring that test results are received. The same study also reported that one-third of physicians do not always notify patients of abnormal test results. By one estimate, abnormal outpatient test results are not communicated in 7.1 percent of treatment relationships.
In Australia you don’t have to register with a doctor, you can just ring any clinic and make an appointment, only sometimes if you’re ringing after midday you might not be able to get an appointment on the same day, and if you can’t you can just go to a walk-in clinic and be seen by a doctor within an hour, a doctor! not a damn nurse! Not to mention most doctors surgeries are open saturday and sundays too, here seems they are all closed on the weekend.
Yes, I hear what you are saying. I would pursue if it was me, based on the limited facts I have here. Particularly if you now have permant damage to your ankle. Ankles have a funny way of NOT healing well to begin with, having the arduous job of holding up our weight in full every time we take a step AND being a 'steering' mechanism for a feet. I'd make that appointment with a med. mal. attorney right in your area.

In the doctrine of joint and several liability among tortfeasors, when there are multiple tortfeasors (“guilty” parties), all parties are equally liable for the damages caused to the injured party. This doctrine is quite harsh. For example, if the driver of a truck hits a pedestrian at night and the jury holds that the city is 15 percent responsible because it did not properly maintain the lighting at that portion of the road and the truck driver, who is 85 percent at fault, is uninsured, unemployed, and without assets, the city can be made to pay 100 percent of the damages. Under the doctrine of contribution, one tortfeasor may sue a fellow tortfeasor to recover any damages paid in excess of the proportion of fault. In most comparative fault states liability is the proportionate responsibility of each party.
Thank you for your answer. All I care about is his getting punished more than getting anything back. My medications cost around $3000 a month and my health will continue to deteriorate until I can see another GI which will not be any sooner than 1 month. Does that not count as negligence. I find it very hard to believe that a GI with 23 yrs of experience does not know about this disease which has commercials on TV every other day.
Interesting comments. My heart goes out to the doctors caught in the middle,as well as patients discovering to their chagrin the diiference between dependence and addiction. I have been treating addictions for over 20 years in both urban and rural areas in the northeast part of the U.S. I have found addiction does not discriminate but society still does, particularly by marginalizing and stigmatizing much in the same manner as we did for cancer years ago and HIV/mental illness more recently.
In the past, a lawyer acting for a wronged patient might have advised his or her client first to report the matter to the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), the professional body mandated to register health professionals and ensure practitioners are fit to practise, before proceeding with a civil case in the courts. Even though the HPCSA does not have the power to arbitrate on compensation, the rationale was that an HPCSA ruling and censure of the doctors concerned would improve the chances of a patient succeeding in a civil case.
An August 2003 National Bureau of Economic Research paper by Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra found that (1) "increases in malpractice payments made on behalf of physicians do not seem to be the driving force behind increases in premiums"; (2) "increases in malpractice costs (both premiums overall and the subcomponent factors) do not seem to affect the overall size of the physician workforce, although they may deter marginal entry, increase marginal exit, and reduce the rural physician workforce"; and (3) "there is little evidence of increased use of many treatments in response to malpractice liability at the state level, although there may be some increase in screening procedures such as mammography."[49]
I haven’t touched on that question. It would make it painful for me. I would be moved to tears if that whole case revolved around just my testimony. I was on the stand so briefly. But cumulatively between what I said and the other testimony — it was never a level playing field for the plaintiff. People don’t recognize it. How the judges don’t recognize it and the system doesn’t recognize it is beyond me. It’s something I’m coming to grips with.
In the United States, there are many jurisdictional issues that could bar bringing a claim in an American court. Litigants would have to establish that the doctor had sufficient contacts with the United States for it to exert jurisdiction over him or her. Even if the court does find that it can take jurisdiction over the case, it has to determine which nation and state’s laws would apply.
Talk to your new doctor about what happened to you, and get their professional opinion, not only on your current condition, but also on the elements of negligence and causality described above. This will give you a better idea of whether your previous doctor really is at fault, and whether his or her actions are to blame for your current predicament.
We consider all cases on a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA), also known as a No Win No Fee agreement. This means that if you are not successful in pursuing your claim, we will not charge you any of our base legal costs. If we are successful with your claim, we submit the costs which we have incurred in pursuing the claim to the defendant/s and or their insurers. We are also entitled to charge a success fee, which will be deducted from your recoverable damages at the end of the claim. However, we can offer a competitive success fee and our aim will always to beat a success fee offer by any other firm. This means that we aim to beat the terms offered by other law firms and you will receive more of your compensation.

In order to succeed with a medical malpractice claim you must prove that your doctor or other health care provider’s treatment of you was “negligent”, which in medical malpractice cases is defined as treatment that falls below the “standard of care” of practice for a reasonable practitioner in a particular area of medicine. Just proving you had a bad result from a medical treatment or procedure is not sufficient; some bad results can occur even when your doctor was not negligent. Sometimes there are “known risks” that are unavoidable with certain surgeries, treatments or medication. Further, even proving a departure from the standard of care is not enough! You must then prove that the mistake or error “proximately caused” the injury or damage to you. For example, your doctor may have departed from a reasonable standard of care in not diagnosing properly your fractured wrist. Maybe he completely overlooked the fracture. But what if he had properly diagnosed it? Would your wrist be any better now? If a proper diagnosis would not have lead to a better result, then there is no “causation” between your doctor’s negligence and your injury. In other words, “no harm, no foul”. A good medical malpractice lawyer knows how to analyze carefully the “elements” (what you have to prove) of a medical malpractice case. He or she also knows how to present these elements to a jury. The Syracuse medical malpractice lawyers of Michaels & Smolak has the skill, experience and expertise to maximize your chances of prevailing. So contact us for a free consultation.
Seek out an appropriate specialist who can treat your specific injury.  Give the doctor your full medical history, including the circumstances surrounding the recent medical error.  Remember that medical records are the most important factors when determining a doctor’s error.  Make sure you give the new doctor enough correct and thorough information to ensure that the charts accurately record your state of health following the medical error.  To make sure your doctor fully understands your present condition and that these facts are properly recorded, be sure to share the “complete picture” by explaining what your health was like before, during, and after the accident, as well as your current condition.  Make sure your new doctor has access to any medical records that may impact his/her diagnosis and plan for treatment.
In addition, the fact that you like your doctor doesn’t actually mean that he’s any good at what he does. It would be a mistake to let your doctor get away with malpractice if he is exercising a poor quality of care. Remember: the fact that he’s a nice guy doesn’t mean he’s a competent physician. Don’t you want to receive compensation for your injury or the injury of a loved one and possibly keep him from injuring someone else?
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