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Medical Malpractice Help | Medical Malpractice Burden Of Proof

3. Evidence - keep track of any evidence which could be relevant to your case. Keep detailed records of your appointments with your GP, together with records of any telephone consultations and referral appointments. Your solicitor will arrange to obtain and copy of your medical notes and x-rays. You will have to pass this information on to your lawyer and it will be a lot easier if you have it at hand. Keep any prescriptions, receipts from further treatments, notes of further treatment and a diary detailing the progression of your health issues. For example, if you fell ill with appendicitis and your GP failed to diagnose it, you should keep a note of the progression of your condition, if you are well enough to do so. All of this is not vital, but very helpful.  
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld

Dr Obey Nhiwatiwa, who was the doctor on call at the Walvis Bay state hospital on the day Nghinamwaami was admitted, states in papers filed with the court that he intends to testify that after certifying the death of the baby he was informed by the nurses that “the mother was fine and I proceeded to attend to other patients and duties as the doctor on call at the time”.

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Jeremy there are a whole lot of issues on the NHS in the UK . One initial one was people from places like the US where you pay for medical treatment coming on “medical holidays ” and getting treatment here that would cost them 10,s of 1000,s of $$$$ in the US, for free ,called in the US “freeloading ” it caused a “big stink ” here and regulations were brought in . Second the UK NHS is about 35 % privatized and heading for total privatization in ENGLAND , there are staff shortages as medical people have to work long hours so that shareholders can get a big profit . The people running them are, in effect accountants not medical staff , supplies are limited because of high drug costs by rip-off giant pharmaceutical companies charging extortionate prices for their patented drugs , this is being fought against in places like India where the government says -enough already – and is backing home made generic varieties without giving the giants their profits . Doctors are self employed in GP surgeries ie- private businesses contracted to the NHS , there is a lot more but you see the UK is not Australia nor parts of Europe.
The ancient Romans also had a legal foundation for medical malpractice law. Their first written laws, on the XII Tables, included the concepts of delicts, iniuria, and damnum iniuria datum. Delicts were types of wrongful conduct that involved penalties. Inuria and damnum iniuria datum were two types of delict. Inuria referred to personal injuries, and damnum iniuria datum referred to injury of property, which could include slaves. Inuria only included injuries that were intentionally caused. A person could be compensated for pain of mind or body as well as monetary expenses resulting from the injury. Damnum iniuria datum also included harm caused by negligent actions, but only mandated compensation for economic losses caused by harm to property. For example, if someone’s slave required medical attention as the result of another person’s negligent actions, they could demand payment through damnum iniuria datum. Eventually, this law was expanded to apply to free men in addition to slaves (O’Connel and Carpenter 1983).  
Based on a summary it is extremely difficult to give a yes or no "is this malpractice" answer. The medical malpractice law comes right out and states that medical malpractice requires more than simply an unfortunate medical result. Professional medical liability is based on proof that the care that was given fell below the average standard of care, and that damages resulted as a result of that substandard care.
Although this may sound like “tough love”, if you feel that you need or want to bring suit against your doctor because he or she injured you or a loved one, and your family or friends are giving your grief about it, maybe it’s time to think about whether they really have your best interests at heart. If bringing suit is something you feel that you need to do to pay for lost wages, medical bills, pain and suffering, or just to regain some sense of control over the situation, your good friends and family will eventually come to understand and stick by your side.
A medical malpractice case isn't the kind of legal action you want to try handling on your own. These cases can get very complex from a legal, medical, and procedural standpoint. Proving your case is going to require not just a firm understanding of the law as it applies to your situation, but a familiarity with the kinds of hoops a medical malpractice plaintiff needs to jump through, including the retention of the right expert medical witness.
Calitz explains that to bring a successful medical malpractice claim, you need to prove that the treatment you received deviated from a particular “standard of care”, and that it was the deviation (which can be an act or omission) from this standard that resulted in harm. The “standard of care” is defined as what a reasonably prudent medical provider would or would not have done under the same or similar circumstances.

This is a crucial determination. Just because medical negligence occurred at a hospital, it doesn't necessarily follow that the facility itself can be held responsible. If your case is based on sub-standard care provided by an individual doctor, and that doctor is an independent contractor (and not an employee of the hospital), you need to pursue action against the doctor him/herself. In many cases, you can't sue a hospital for a doctor's treatment error, unless the doctor is an employee of the hospital (most are not), or when the doctor's incompetence should have been obvious to the hospital.
Things have changed. I can remember when doctors were revered by their patients, in those days doctors did their best and patients hoped it would be enough. The word MAL-PRACTICE was almost unheard of. Now its on the mind of every single doctor in this country, every single day, along with the cost of skyrocketing insurance. The way the public views and treats doctors has changed and the way doctors view their patients is changing right along with it. Almost nobody picks up hitchhikers anymore, nobody is willing to risk martyring themselves just to play the good Samaritan in a world that will view them as stupid, and deserving of what they got if they pick up the wrong person.

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The only change was policy in the state/federal regulations that has the pain doctors running because stupid idiots sell their meds to kids on the street and the government can do only 1 thing well and that is to over-react… So now we have all the pain mgmt. docs leaving private practices and scared to prescribe, forced to prescribe new formulations that cost a fortune as that is what the DEA says they should do – instead of cheap generics (because everyone will abuse the generics…..).
That is one of the main reasons the legal system exists! To compensate people who been injured by their doctors’ mistakes! If your doctor has made a medical mistake, he may well have committed what is known in the legal community as negligence. In order to prove negligence, your attorney will have to show that (a) your doctor owed you a duty of care, (b) your doctor breached that duty of care, (c) your doctor’s breach caused you injury, and (d) you did in fact suffer an injury.

i was a client of mind springs mental health in colorado for many years and dr. richard berkley has decided to just drop me as a client without bothering to inform me or to properly detox me from schedule 2 medications i have been on for years- he also decided to cut memory enhancing and sleep apnea medications in half without informing me of the changes and i had used the medication as i had always done then i had to suffer detox symptoms for that medication- now i face detox from adderall, valium and provigil in just days as i will be out of these medications. i am certain that this could be considered attempted manslaughter as he is aware that just stopping these medications cold turkey that death is a very real possibility. i warn people of using doctor richard berkley as a precriber because his ethics are slim to none when it comes to informing patients he is going to make med changes or drop them without properly bringing them off these kinds of medications...karin wrape, former client of mind springs mental health-oh and they also scheduled me for an appointment at an office in a city i have never been to... talk about incompetence!
I happen to agree with your statement about there being a possibility for future cancer patients not getting the treatment they need if I was to take further action. But I wonder what exactly makes you assume that I am “living on welfare looking for even more “free money””? Ever consider that my cancer diagnosis wasn’t the only reason I am on disability? And really?? Did you read the post where I said I’m okay with coming off the meds? Its difficult, yes. But i have a choice every day to simply call up any unscrupulous doctor and get a prescription any time I want. I don’t do that. I’m sticking with the doctor who is weening me, because I believe it needs to be done. All you seem to have read was that I want more medicine, when I don’t.
Another potential cause of action is intentional infliction of emotional distress. This is based on a doctor’s outrageous conduct that intentionally or recklessly causes a patient to suffer severe emotional distress. This must be beyond a mere slight as it must be something that would outrage society. The common law tort required a physical manifestation of injury, but most jurisdictions no longer require this element. This cause of action has been successful in some cases in which patients recorded their doctors performing medical treatment while mocking and ridiculing the patient to a serious degree. 

Regardless of how much you want to be the one selected to do the procedure, that's the patient's choice not yours. I think it's smart to look into a physician's background before selecting them to do surgery. I would want to know how much experience you have or if there had been malpractice issues. Patients are the ones paying and taking the risks. They get to decide how much risk they're willing to take -not the physician. If you refuse to answer the questions, which I do believe is your right, then it lets the patient decide what to do next - either get on the medical board website and see if anything has been reported, talk to more people, find another physician who doesn't mind answering the questions, etc.
Your attorney can help you determine whether you were the victim of  medical malpractice. Attorneys conduct independent medical research with the assistance of physicians and nurses to determine whether medical negligence occurred. A poor medical outcome alone does not automatically mean medical malpractice was committed. In order to receive compensation, you must prove that the defendant failed to provide reasonable care. Please feel free to call usanytime for free a consultation to help you get your questions answered.
A number of states hold the hospital responsible if it gives staff privileges to an incompetent or dangerous doctor, even if the doctor is an independent contractor. The hospital is also responsible if it should have known that a previously safe doctor had become incompetent or dangerous. For example, if a doctor becomes severely addicted to drugs and the hospital management knew about it, or it was so obvious they should have known about it, a patient injured by that doctor can probably sue the hospital.
Doctors' groups, patients, and insurance companies have criticized medical malpractice litigation as expensive, adversarial, unpredictable, and inefficient. They claim that the cost of medical malpractice litigation in the United States has steadily increased at almost 12 percent annually since 1975.[27] More recent research from the same source has found that tort costs as a percentage of GDP dropped between 2001 and 2009, and are now at their lowest level since 1984.[28] Jury Verdict Research, a database of plaintiff and defense verdicts, says awards in medical liability cases increased 43 percent in 1999, from $700,000 to $1,000,000. However, more recent research from the U.S. Department of Justice has found that median medical malpractice awards in states range from $109,000 to $195,000.[29]

Medical tests can be divided into two broad categories: diagnostic tests and screening tests. Diagnostic tests are administered to patients who exhibit signs of a disease or condition, such as a woman with a lump in her breast or a man with pain and pressure in his chest. Screening tests, on the other hand, are performed on patients who are considered to be at risk of developing a disease or condition – for example, routine mammograms for women and PSA screenings for men.
Although it is not unheard of for a doctor to alter medical records, it is extremely rare. If your doctor does alter your medical records, this fact alone will not irreparably harm your case. There have been major advances in forensic technology over the past years. It is now possible to detect changes in ink, spacing, and handwriting that may have been made by your doctor when he tried to alter your records.
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dear carol i know its not much to offer in this situation but i can give you infromation that might help your son first of all have you consired he is having side effcets to the new medication make sure you geg name of it also i suggest you had to pandasnetwork. org it not what you think it talk about an autoimmune condtion that cause many syptoms like you say also if are heading to a solictor maybe talk your son into getting a chromosome test if possible because if they belive adhd is caused by improper chromosome numbers they should of least told you about it hang in there its such a shame what those pschyrtist do they like vlutrues they prey on weak till they dead,thats an offense to vlutures least the ARE HONEST hope info help

Our lawyers are focused on medical malpractice claims. We have extensive experience handling complicated claims involving medical errors, and our knowledgeable legal team is prepared to thoroughly investigate your case. We will need to show exactly what happened and identify every party that may be held responsible. Our team will gather all the evidence and consult with outside medical experts to show that there is a clear basis for your claim.
Despite this, the perception of “lawsuits gone wild” exists. As a result, many states have imposed substantial limits on damage awards in medical-malpractice claims. These award limits typically have the greatest impact on patients who are most gravely hurt—those with catastrophic injuries and a lifetime of future medical needs. And patients who are denied justice in the courts must rely on health insurance and, in many instances, such public programs as Medicare or Medicaid to pay their future medical bills—leaving the cost of medical malpractice to the public instead of the responsible party.
This is a crucial determination. Just because medical negligence occurred at a hospital, it doesn't necessarily follow that the facility itself can be held responsible. If your case is based on sub-standard care provided by an individual doctor, and that doctor is an independent contractor (and not an employee of the hospital), you need to pursue action against the doctor him/herself. In many cases, you can't sue a hospital for a doctor's treatment error, unless the doctor is an employee of the hospital (most are not), or when the doctor's incompetence should have been obvious to the hospital.
Holding Negligent Healthcare Providers Accountable Our team of experienced, litigating attorneys have spent thousands of hours in actual courtrooms fighting for victims of medical malpractice in Florida. Our firm has the resources necessary to hire the appropriate expert witnesses, investigators, … Continue reading Florida Medical Malpractice Attorneys
Many factors are taken into consideration when determining the level of compensation to which you are entitled. The severity of the injury is perhaps the most important factor. We are able to provide advice as to the reasonable value of your claim based on our years of experience in handling medical malpractice, nursing home negligence, personal injury and wrongful death cases. The following is a list of recent awards we obtained for our clients.
Recently I've been trying to get my medications reduced. When I switched Dr.'s he could not believe the medications and does the previous Dr. had me on. Currently, I am taking (100 mg X 2 of Zoloft), (0.1 X 3 of Clonidine), (2mg X 3 per day Xanax), (300mg X 1 Seroquel XR). These medications have been increased or were prescribed in this amount and after being rushed to the Hospital after what the Doctors believe was a seizure or mild stroke my wife started looking into the interactions of my medications and I was taken off of (Wellbutrin XL 300), (Hydroxyzine PAM 50mg X 2 per day), (Vyvanse 60mg), (Temazepam 30mg), (Duloxetine 60mg).
This is not to say that doctors can withhold details when they believe a patient might refuse treatment they deem beneficial, though. My father, Barry J. Nace, was actually involved in a seminal case that has helped to further shape the boundaries of informed consent in such situations. Canterbury v. Spence, 464 F2d 772 (D.C. 1972) involved a surgeon who withheld the possibility of paralysis from a spine surgery patient, fearing that anxiety on the part of the individual might lead to postponing the procedure. Ultimately, the patient suffered complications and ended up paralyzed, while the surgeon claimed he was operating within community disclosure standards—an accepted idea at the time that judged whether physicians within a particular “community” would customarily convey such information in similar circumstances.
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