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Medical Malpractice Deaths 2017 | Medical Malpractice Deaths

@ Anon, since when do we not ask lawyers about their success rates?! I don't have much experience with the legal system, but to the best of my knowledge, most people research a lawyer before hiring them. I've never hired a lawyer, but if I needed legal representation, I'd certainly find out what kind of experience and success a lawyer had before asking them to represent me! (It may be somewhat less if it's a lawyer that takes the case on contingency, but then you at least have the guarantee that they're really motivated to win.)
The fact-finder will render a verdict for the prevailing party. If the plaintiff prevails, the fact-finder will assess damages within the parameters of the judge's instructions. The verdict is then reduced to the judgment of the court. The losing party may move for a new trial. In a few jurisdictions, a plaintiff who is dissatisfied by a small judgment may move for additur. In most jurisdictions, a defendant who is dissatisfied with a large judgment may move for remittitur. Either side may take an appeal from the judgment.
According to the Institute of Medicine, up to 98,000 people die in hospitals in the United States every year as a result of medical errors that could have been prevented.  These medical errors are the eighth leading cause of death in the United States, which is higher than motor vehicle accidents. Victims of medical malpractice and their family members do have legal rights to sue a hospital in the event that negligent medical care causes an injury or death.

Yahoo fait partie d’Oath. Oath et ses partenaires ont besoin de votre consentement pour accéder à votre appareil et utiliser vos données, notamment votre position géographique, afin de comprendre vos centres d’intérêt, de diffuser des publicités personnalisées et de mesurer leur efficacité. Oath vous présentera également des publicités personnalisées sur les produits de ses partenaires. En savoir plus.

In the mid 1990s the concept of a ‘gratuitous care’ award was developed by the High Court.  Basically, if you can’t look after yourself or your house (or in some cases your children) because of your injuries, then you can claim the cost of a commercial carer or cleaner even though your family is doing the tasks you can’t do.  For a while this was a very lucrative area of damages but now there are laws that place both a threshold and a cap on what you can claim.  Put simply, you aren’t entitled to any gratuitous care award unless you need at least 6 hours of assistance per week for at least 6 continuous months and the hourly rate of any award is capped at the Average Weekly Earnings hourly rate.  You should be careful, however, not to confuse gratuitous care with commercial care, which is a different claim for damages entirely and which is not the subject of thresholds or caps.

Yet you actually believe that medical practices are going to continue to risk everything for nothing just because you think you can shame them into playing right into their enemies hands? Because courtrooms and juries across this land, are very quickly forcing doctors to see those patients who beg them to risk everything to relieve their pain as potential enemies and destroyers of everything they’ve spent a lifetime building. If just one out of a thousand patients turns into your enemy for profit, you loose half a lifetimes work, let 2 out of a thousand do it and your FINISHED. You wouldn’t risk your business or your financial future, betting on the sterling character of everyone that walks through your door, why should doctors be different? Newsflash!! Drug abuse (legal or otherwise) can destroy your life !! But let an unscrupulous lawyer tell you that he can not only give it all back to you, but make you a millionaire to boot, all you have to do is be willing to put that blame on somebody else… Well who ISN’T going to go for that deal? The number 1 cause of all drug abuse is IRRESPONSIBILITY, yet you think drug abusers wont jump at the chance to hold ANYONE but themselves responsible?
Once the claimant has satisfied the pre-suit investigation and notice requirements, the claimant may be able to file a medical malpractice lawsuit in the Florida court system. In order to prevail in a medical negligence case against a doctor, the claimant has the burden of proof. This burden may be difficult to meet, given that there is often a presumption that the doctor acted reasonably and properly under the circumstances.
Lucie anything to do with your lungs should be taken seriously .A lung infection makes its way down your lungs starting with upper congestion ,it is not something that “goes away ” unless you have a high body resistance and it lasts for a long time (years). It can cause permanent scarring to the lungs and giving you a low dose of anti-biotics without an x- ray and hospital investigation can not only only be temporary relief it can make the infection stronger because it can easily overcome the anti-biotics if the infection is deep enough . If the pills the doctor gave you didnt work inn the long run and you still have it and it is getting worse then your health is in serious danger at the very least of permanent lowering of lung efficiency , which if you had an accident and needed serious surgery would hamper your ability to be given anesthetics via the mouth . While this is the serious end of it , this is something nobody should make light of , if your doctor is not ,in your eyes performing his duties of keeping you in good health you can complain to the county council and also the medical authorities . Your health is in YOUR hands please dont leave this Lucie. I have worked in hospitals (infectious diseases ) and that includes serious lung infections and the results thereof .

Surgeries run on a contract system with the NHS in other words most are self-employed . If you think the surgery is being mismanaged you should contact your local councilor who will take it up with the local health authority . They cannot close down surgeries without registering you with another local one , I have seen a case of a lady doctor runing a practice all on her own but as she got older she coudnt take anymore and asked for help but didn,t get on with the doctors who wanted to take the practice from her and she resigned even though the local residents loved her .The practice was taken over by another surgery a few miles away but the patients don,t like them as much.
Medical malpractice lawsuits, like all civil cases, can only be brought within a certain period of time. That deadline is set by a law known called a “statute of limitations.” Every state has passed these kinds of laws, with different deadlines according to the kind of case you want to file. In almost every state, there is a dedicated statute of limitations that applies to medical malpractice cases.
Another common form of physician negligence is surgical error. Like all types of medical malpractice, surgical error is dependent upon the standard of care. But unlike in diagnostic error cases, common surgical errors are often very easy to identify. Amputating the wrong leg, leaving surgical instruments inside a patient’s body, performing the wrong procedure, or performing a procedure without informed consent -- these types of errors constitute physician negligence and are often very east to spot. If your surgeon breached the standard of care and caused you harm, your surgeon was likely negligent.
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld
Medical malpractice cases must be brought soon after the injury. In most states, you must bring a medical malpractice claim fairly quickly -- often between six months and two years, depending on the state. (The time period in which you must bring the lawsuit is called the "statute of limitations.") If you don't file the lawsuit within the specified period of time, the court will dismiss the case regardless of the facts.
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Let’s suppose that the doctor prescribed a medication that was wrong for you and you had an adverse reaction. But you were also prone to strokes, and you had a stroke. Unless the medication is known to increase the risk of strokes, the medication did not cause your condition, so while the doctor was negligent, he or she did not cause your predicament through that negligence.
For example, if a doctor prescribes a medication without first asking you about allergies, and you have a severe adverse reaction, this could be a case of negligence. But if you failed to mention one of your allergies when asked, or the doctor could have had no way of knowing that you could be allergic to the medicine prescribed, there was no negligence, and you would be unable to sue for malpractice.
We'll see what ends up happening on retrial, but I thought this was an interesting emerging area of law. What if the issue wasn't technical incompetence? How much "personal background" should a doctor have to tell a patient before treatment can begin? Medical school grades? Failure to pay income tax? Should doctors be required to disclose to patients the fact that they've been treated for mental illness themselves?

As for your attempt to on the one hand to frame doctors as greedy drug dealers responsible for for most of this countries drug abuse, while at the same time trying to shame them into believing that theirs is a selfless avocation, some kind of priesthood where anyone not willing to martyr themselves to an ungrateful public, shouldn’t be able to practice. -Well i think you’d better put down whatever pills you’ve been swallowing, and come back to reality. Medicine is a profession, and its filled with human beings, not saints or demons. Human beings who will choose their own well being over that of a potential enemy every time just as YOU would. And greedy lawyers, unscrupulous patients, and unwitting juries all over this country are increasingly causing doctors to view their patients as potential enemies.


Have you been injured due to military hospital medical malpractice? Under United States tort law, federal employees are not personally liable for most torts they commit in the course of their work. Instead, you can only hold those employees responsible using a special law called the Federal Tort Claims Act. This includes Army, Navy, and Air Force hospitals.In some respects, FTCA cases are quite different from ordinary tort cases. In such a case, the injured party may not file a lawsuit against the government until he or she has exhausted all administrative remedies. The injured party must first file an administrative claim with the proper agency of the United States government within a limited amount of time. Whitehurst, Harkness, Brees, Cheng, Alsaffar, Higginbotham, and Jacob, PLLC, has experience in representing injured parties at the administrative claim stage and throughout trial in federal courts all over the United States.
P.S. Opioid tolerance and dependence are normal and expected physiological responses to continuous opioid therapy. Fixing a patient’s physical dependence on a opioid once there is no more need of it for pain relief is a simple matter of tapering down. Thousands of people who were lucky enough to survive cancer or other trauma do it every year, no dramas.

As a nurse and a patient (of medical and psychiatric docs) I think that if a doc lies when obtaining informed consent, that is clearly NOT ok - not sure if that is malpractice and/or a licensure issue. I think asking about complications rates and experience with a particular procedure are absolutely appropriate questions, for any MD. When you read articles for consumers about how to get good care, these are questions you are encouraged to ask!!! If the doc has had little experience and/or complications, doc can have prepared a statement explaining why he feels adequately prepared in this case, what is different about this case in terms of risk of complications(such as 'other pt. had another serious illness that increased risk, etc.)
In order to successfully prosecute a medical malpractice lawsuit, the party bringing the action (the plaintiff) must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the negligent act of a healthcare provider caused injury to the plaintiff. The entire burden of proof resides on the plaintiff; the government need not even present a witness. In order to prove its case, the plaintiff must present the testimony of qualified experts who support his position. Identifying experts and working with them is a major part of preparing your case for trial. Our firm retains only experts of impeccable character and the highest professional credentials. We do this to ensure that when we get to trial, the United States will be unable to attack our case by attacking our experts.
There is a limited amount of time within which a patient can make a medical malpractice claim against a medical professional. While the actual statutes of limitations for these claims vary by state, you will always have at least a year after the injury has taken place. The list below contains the statute of limitations for each state. Note that in many states, the statute contains considerations regarding when a patient discovered or realized medical negligence occurred. This is referred to as the discovery rule.

No matter your jurisdiction, medical malpractice claims and lawsuits are primarily about one thing: accountability. People trust that doctors will take care of them and make their condition better in a patient’s hour of need. When doctors fail in that responsibility, they must be held accountable for the negligent actions they took – as well as for the actions that they failed to take under the circumstances.

Your attorney should also disclose “bad facts” in the opening statement.[20] A bad fact is anything the defense would want to bring to the jury’s attention because it makes the defense case much stronger. For example, your failure to follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment is a bad fact. By disclosing bad facts first, your attorney can take the sting out of them.
A personal example - I had a physician try to talk me in to ECT several years ago. I explained that I didn't want to do it, because I didn't want to accept the risks of permanent memory loss. He denied those risks at first. He told me it was cooked up by the scientologists and anti-psychiatry folks and assumed my resistance was due to having seen the movie One Flew Over a Cuckoos Nest (which I had not seen, by the way). I finally got him to concede it was a risk, a risk I wasn't willing to take. I don't care how small the risk is or if the physician thinks it's worth it. They better tell me the truth. He wasn't the one having the procedure and accepting those risks. I was. As long as I am legally competent, the decision is mine. I have real issues about trying to coerce someone into signing an informed consent document by lying. That's unethical. I continue to be glad I didn't do it. It's a very individual decision.
Doctor negligence claims can be complex as it can often be difficult to show that the injury or illness you are suffering from has been caused or exacerbated by the negligence of your GP. Your solicitor will arrange for you to be assessed by an independent medical expert who will assess your injuries and/or illness and will advise on whether the symptoms you are experiencing have been caused by the negligent actions (or inactions) of your GP.
A physician that delivers substandard care subjects him or herself to a formal compliant. Misdiagnosis, careless treatment that causes you harm, or an unusual delay in treatment are complaint-worthy medical errors. Prescribing issues, such as under- or overprescribing medication or giving you the wrong medication, are also grounds for a formal complaint. Working under the influence of drugs or alcohol; sexual misconduct; practicing without a license; and altering records are a few other examples of proper types of complaints.
Financial loss can include the future costs of caring for the patient. It can also include the patient’s future lost income where, as a result of the negligence, the patient is no longer able to work or to earn as much as he or she would otherwise.  Where a patient will need significant care support and will no longer be able to work, the amount of damages awarded when you bring a claim against the NHS or a hospital can be extremely high. 
There was a violation of the standard of professional conduct - The law acknowledges that there are certain legal standards that are recognized by the profession as being acceptable conduct. These standards of professional conduct are largely determined by the ethics rules of the state bar association. Attorneys have an obligation to their clients and the bar to operate within these standards. Clients have the right to expect attorneys will follow the law, behave in an ethical and honest manner, act in the best interests of their clients with integrity, diligence and good faith, and will execute their matters at a level of competency that protects their legal rights. Lawyers must also maintain and supply clients with full and detailed reports of all money and/or property handled for them. Finally, attorneys must not inflict damage on third parties through frivolous litigation or malicious prosecution. If it is determined that the standards of professional conduct have been violated, then negligence may be established.
The number of hospital mistakes responsible for serious but non-fatal injuries is even higher. In the state of New York, can a medical malpractice law firm help you seek legal recourse if you are injured while you’re receiving care or treatment in a hospital? For those seeking justice in this state, the answer is yes. Hospital negligence leading to severe injury or death includes malpractice by doctors, nurses, physician’s assistants, nurse’s aides, and even technicians who work for the hospital.

Similar to the errors in treatment discussed above, pharmaceutical errors can constitute medical negligence if the errors are in violation of the standard of care. If you’ve watched television long enough to reach a commercial break, you’ve likely seen commercials for prescription drugs that end with a litany of potentially dangerous side effects. When prescribed and used as directed, the benefits of use are thought to outweigh the potential dangers. But if your physician prescribes an inappropriate drug to treat your condition -- whether misdiagnosed or diagnosed correctly -- he or she has violated the standard of care and committed an act of negligence.


I do get fed up with media criticism of a “failing NHS”; it’s not failing – it’s doing an incredibly good job in the circumstances. I also get fed up with my generation being blamed for living too long and putting a strain on the NHS. The failure of planning for the country’s future needs goes back to the early years of this century and cannot be laid at the door of the present government. The government either has to limit the rise in population, or invest in the resources to meet its demands, or do a bit of both. Doing neither has got us to where we are today.
Asking about action against licensure and malpractice history - in Mass, this is public information if you look it up on state web site. Even if it is not public info, it is still a relevant question. I'd MUCH rather have a doc explain briefly (without violating his/her own or other patients' privacy) what went wrong and how it has been corrected, than to have an MD who lies.
Alfa raises an interesting point about the abstraction of general practitioners into private work and certainly the number of people seeking private health care seems to be on the rise. To some extent this takes the pressure off the NHS and a lot of what private hospitals do would not be available under the NHS, or at least not as elective [or non-immediate or non-emergency] surgery. Nevertheless, they probably have a higher ratio of staff than NHS establishments and give more time to their patients so they ‘consume’ a disproportionate amount of the country’s finite professional medical resources. Concerns have been raised that many doctors and consultants have been trained by the the NHS but are then ‘selling’ their time to private patients or private hospitals.
Medical doctors must go through an enormous amount of schooling and training before they are allowed to be physicians and practice medicine. But even so, they are still human – and sometimes things go wrong. When this happens, it is called “medical malpractice”. Medical malpractice occurs when a patient is harmed by a doctor (or medical paraprofessional) who fails to competently perform their duties. The rules about medical malpractice and what must be done to sue on those grounds are varied and, in some cases, very specific. From knowing when you must bring your lawsuit to knowing whether you must notify the doctor ahead of time and how to do it, the team of legal professionals at the Sodhi Law Group will guide you through the process. Here is a brief overview of types of malpractice followed by what requirements must be met for something to constitute medical malpractice.
In most "injury cases" - social security disability, workers' compensation, personal injury - you will be examined by a doctor from the "other side." Often the doctors involved have different opinions. The rules put forth by the Social Security Administration give more weight (consideration) to the opinion of a treating physician for this very reason - a treating physician should know their patient better than an IME doctor.
They can easily get away with anything while hiding behind "confidentiality/patient privacy." They can also be knuckleheads because there is no agreement , consensus or strict definition of the various conditions. They can make any statement sounds nuts. I agree with taping (but the client keeps the tapes) and if the shrink objects, find someone else.
Sounds like a problem I had 5 months ago . I wakened in the morning to extreme pain ,it just got worse till I was doubled up in pain gasping out loud it got so bad I fainted several times . It died down slightly for a few hours then came back strong ,not one to rush to a doctor I suffered it for several days but it just got so bad I couldn’t look after my chair-bound wife and she ended up phoning the doctor who told me to come to the surgery. I practically crawled down the road after tests it turned out I was passing blood due to stones in the kidney -advice given keep drinking till you pass it . Anybody who has had this will know apart from cancer its the worst pain you can feel -no hospital journey to break it up – it took a WEEK for it to pass and the same 5 months for me to recover as I was as weak as water and thought “my number was up ” .
We physicians need to spend out time working with each other to limit abuse and overprescibing when we find it, and educate our patients as best we can regarding our need to limit and taper ceratin medications. While this is unpopular with many patients who are afraid, uneducated or in “pharmacuetical sales themselves”, it is necessary to protect not only them ,but the general public and ourselves. We need to inform legislators so they can make informed legislation, such as commonsense driving laws that do not arrest patients who are stable on mediction for simply driving to work.

Things have changed. I can remember when doctors were revered by their patients, in those days doctors did their best and patients hoped it would be enough. The word MAL-PRACTICE was almost unheard of. Now its on the mind of every single doctor in this country, every single day, along with the cost of skyrocketing insurance. The way the public views and treats doctors has changed and the way doctors view their patients is changing right along with it. Almost nobody picks up hitchhikers anymore, nobody is willing to risk martyring themselves just to play the good Samaritan in a world that will view them as stupid, and deserving of what they got if they pick up the wrong person.
Many people don’t bring a meritorious lawsuit against their doctor because of fear concerning family and friends. Only you can decide for yourself whether bringing a lawsuit against your physician is the right thing for you to do. Only you know the pain and suffering that you have endured – nobody else. Only you know the extent of your lost wages, medical bills, and injury.
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