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Can I Sue My Doctor For Not Diagnosing Me | Medical Malpractice Jurisprudence

Talk to your new doctor about what happened to you, and get their professional opinion, not only on your current condition, but also on the elements of negligence and causality described above. This will give you a better idea of whether your previous doctor really is at fault, and whether his or her actions are to blame for your current predicament.
Generally speaking, from a legal standpoint, you may need to evaluate whether the risk of being left without legal redress in the event of a medical mistake is worth the potential cost savings of having your procedure performed overseas. With such limited remedies available to patients, and the often lower standards of care in nations offering substantially cheaper medical treatment rates, the risks of medical tourism may far exceed the benefits.
In the private sector, many legal contracts of all kinds stipulate the use of mediation or arbitration in the first instance, so it is quite common. Typically, a retired judge or senior advocate presides over the matter. In mediation, he or she listens to both sides and assists the parties to reach a compromise. In arbitration, the presiding officer can impose a binding decision, and can decide whether compensation is due and if so, how much.

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When you go to a hospital, you expect that the medical care you receive will make you better. But with multiple health care professionals in hospitals involved in your treatment, the risk of medical error increases. Sometimes, inadequate patient safety procedures cause hospitals to commit serious medical errors and patients are seriously or fatally injured. Our hospital malpractice attorneys are here for you.
We have reached the point where for many people the NHS cannot attend to their teeth, and some NHS Trusts are now saying that they will not replace people’s hip and knee joints unless they are in unbearable agony, so private clinics will no doubt spring up to satisfy that need. That numerous medical professionals and nurses are tied up doing unnecessary cosmetic procedures is another cause for concern.
Back in 1984, the extrapolated statistics from relatively few records in only several states of the United States estimated that between 44,000-98,000 people annually die in hospitals because of medical errors.[3] Much work has been done since then, including work by the author of that study who moved on from those low estimates back in the 1990s. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently says that 75,000 patients die annually, in hospitals alone, from infections alone - just one cause of harm in just one kind of care setting.[4] From all causes there have been numerous other studies, including "A New, Evidence-based Estimate of Patient Harms Associated with Hospital Care" by John T. James, PhD[5] that estimates 400,000 unnecessary deaths annually in hospitals alone. Using these numbers, medical malpractice is the third leading cause of death in the United States, only behind heart disease and cancer. Less than one quarter of care takes place in hospitals. Across all care settings the numbers are higher.
The more common (and some believe more reliable) approach used by all federal courts and most state courts is the 'gatekeeper' model, which is a test formulated from the US Supreme Court cases Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals (509 U.S. 579 [1993]), General Electric Co. v. Joiner (522 U.S. 136 [1997]), and Kumho Tire Co. v. Carmichael (526 U.S. 137 [1999]). Before the trial, a Daubert hearing[15] will take place before the judge (without the jury). The trial court judge must consider evidence presented to determine whether an expert's "testimony rests on a reliable foundation and is relevant to the task at hand." (Daubert, 509 U.S. at 597). The Daubert hearing considers 4 questions about the testimony the prospective expert proposes:

The fact-finder will render a verdict for the prevailing party. If the plaintiff prevails, the fact-finder will assess damages within the parameters of the judge's instructions. The verdict is then reduced to the judgment of the court. The losing party may move for a new trial. In a few jurisdictions, a plaintiff who is dissatisfied by a small judgment may move for additur. In most jurisdictions, a defendant who is dissatisfied with a large judgment may move for remittitur. Either side may take an appeal from the judgment.


An August 2003 National Bureau of Economic Research paper by Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra found that (1) "increases in malpractice payments made on behalf of physicians do not seem to be the driving force behind increases in premiums"; (2) "increases in malpractice costs (both premiums overall and the subcomponent factors) do not seem to affect the overall size of the physician workforce, although they may deter marginal entry, increase marginal exit, and reduce the rural physician workforce"; and (3) "there is little evidence of increased use of many treatments in response to malpractice liability at the state level, although there may be some increase in screening procedures such as mammography."[49]

Among the acts or omissions that may potentially support a medical malpractice claim are the failure to properly diagnose a disease or medical condition, the failure to provide appropriate treatment for a medical condition, and unreasonable delay in treating a diagnosed medical condition.[7] In some jurisdictions a medical malpractice action may be allowed even without a mistake from the doctor, based upon principles of informed consent, where a patient was not informed of possible consequences of a course of treatment and would have declined the medical treatment had proper information been provided in advance.[7]


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I am a cancer patient at a very large cancer center in FL – I have been treated in their palliative pain department for over 3 years due to pain caused from nerve damage in surgeries/lymphedema/ and a chronic pain condition of the lower extremities. I argued with my dr. about the constant increase in my pain meds – i did not want them to increase, but was told that was the only way to manage the pain I was in. After a few months, I relented. 3 years later, Im labeled a “stable” patient and released from the cancer center to find a community dr. I was told that since my cancer was now in remission and my pain under control, they needed to tend to more needy patients. OK. I could not find any “legal” doctor to see me for pain management. The ones i found were either asking for lots of $$$ up front (no thank you) or only helping patients with injections or spinal surgeries. I finally found a DR. who agreed to help me – ween off the pain meds only – because he did not want me to be forced to go cold turkey off the dosages i was on. Fine by me.
You must make your claim against the correct person or entity. In some cases, you would sue the doctor directly, but in other cases you might sue the hospital or health care system. In Washington, D.C. you have three years from the date of injury to file a medical malpractice lawsuit. You must make sure that you take action immediately when you have been injured at the hands of a trusted physician or another medical care provider.
An award for pain and suffering is not obtainable unless your injuries reach at least 15% of a most extreme case.  There is, however, no set way of measuring what 15% of a most extreme case looks like so every injured person must be individually assessed by the Judge and a percentage decided.  The maximum award for pain and suffering is about $612,500.00 and is indexed each year to keep pace with inflation.
Things have changed. I can remember when doctors were revered by their patients, in those days doctors did their best and patients hoped it would be enough. The word MAL-PRACTICE was almost unheard of. Now its on the mind of every single doctor in this country, every single day, along with the cost of skyrocketing insurance. The way the public views and treats doctors has changed and the way doctors view their patients is changing right along with it. Almost nobody picks up hitchhikers anymore, nobody is willing to risk martyring themselves just to play the good Samaritan in a world that will view them as stupid, and deserving of what they got if they pick up the wrong person.
A 1950's court decision in England produced what is commonly referred to as the Bolam test. Bolam laid the groundwork for an informal three-pronged test employed in the UK and the US alike. The Lancet wrote, "Since Bolam, modern medical negligence law can be whittled down to three fundamental factors: one, confirming the patient was “owed a legal duty of care” by the health practitioner who is the “defendant” in cases of medical negligence; two, establishing that the defendant was in “breach” of that duty of care in failing to reach the standard of care required by law; three, proving that this breach of duty caused or contributed to the damage or injury to the patient.” These are the elements a patient must prove in order to win a malpractice case today. A breach of standard alone is “meaningless” with regards to liability unless it proximately results in injury to the patient.

People go to see the doctor when ill or after suffering a serious injury. When you make an appointment to see your doctor, you trust that the doctor will help to improve your condition or injury – not make it worse. Doctors and other healthcare providers hold people’s lives in their hands. Consequently, when providers make serious medical mistakes, they can and should be held responsible for their negligence.
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld

As for your attempt to on the one hand to frame doctors as greedy drug dealers responsible for for most of this countries drug abuse, while at the same time trying to shame them into believing that theirs is a selfless avocation, some kind of priesthood where anyone not willing to martyr themselves to an ungrateful public, shouldn’t be able to practice. -Well i think you’d better put down whatever pills you’ve been swallowing, and come back to reality. Medicine is a profession, and its filled with human beings, not saints or demons. Human beings who will choose their own well being over that of a potential enemy every time just as YOU would. And greedy lawyers, unscrupulous patients, and unwitting juries all over this country are increasingly causing doctors to view their patients as potential enemies.


Medical malpractice cases almost always require medical experts to testify about the proper standard of care that should have been provided under the circumstances. These are often physicians who practice within the same type of medicine that the physician defendant practices in. These individuals are usually tasked with the responsibility of explaining that the defendant deviated from the standard of care and that this deviation resulted in the patient suffering the harm alleged in the complaint.
Typically, nurses, medical technicians, and support staff are hospital employees. As long as the employee was doing something job-related when he or she caused an injury to a patient, the patient can usually sue the hospital for resulting damages. For example, if a registered nurse (R.N.) employed by the hospital injects the wrong medication into an IV "push," and the patient ends up suffering harm as a result, then the hospital could probably be considered liable for the R.N.'s mistake.
If you are considering medical tourism, discuss the possible risks with your American general practitioner and, if possible, a local attorney. If you have already undertaken to receive treatment from a foreign doctor, and have suffered an injury, you should discuss the particular details of your case with a qualified, experienced attorney. You will need to find an attorney that has experience not just with medical malpractice, but also with international legal disputes. Before undertaking any legal action against a foreign doctor, you should ask your attorney whether your claim will be worth the trouble of fighting an international legal battle. You may find that you do not have the same entitlements that you would when bringing a claim against an American doctor, and this might make a victory a hollow exercise and a waste of time and money.
A patient who did not have his or her wounds dressed or treated properly and later develops an infection may decide to sue. If an anesthesiologist or other employee gives the patient a drug that he or she should have known would cause issues, the patient may pursue a medical malpractice claim. A common cause for a medical malpractice claim is when the patient was misdiagnosed or had a delayed diagnosis due to a mistake.
Even though current compensation awards take longer lifespans into account, there could still be a mismatch between the assumed lifespan and the actual lifespan of the patient. An arbitration agreement that contracts medical providers to cover the cost of health care for the actual lifetime of the patient removes this risk, Kellerman says, and it would provide the greatest benefit. Waiting for five to eight years for a court resolution is avoided, and there is no erosion of compensation by contingency fees (up to 25 percent), as the costs of the mediation are usually prescribed by fixed tariffs. The process does not place an emotional or financial burden on the injured party, and resolution, if done proactively from the outset, could take less than two years.
In order to take legal action against a medical doctor for malpractice, you cannot just simply file a lawsuit with the court. Rather, you must first send a notice to the doctor, indicating to him or her that you are planning to file a lawsuit for medical malpractice. After filing the notice, there may be a waiting period before the injured patient is eligible to file a lawsuit.
The concept of medical responsibility is historically entrenched, with first mentions dating to the fabled Code of Hammurabi, which famously established the "eye for an eye" maxim. The code arguably offers the founding statement of medical malpractice law, reading “If the doctor has treated a gentlemen with a lancet of bronze and has caused the gentleman to die, or has opened an abscess of the eye for a gentleman with a bronze lancet, and has caused the loss of the gentleman's eye, one shall cut off his hands." Millennia later, "lancet" would become synonymous with the of concept medical responsibility in highbrow intellectual communities, and synonymous with medical malpractice itself. A famed British medical journal, The Lancet, borrows its name from the ancient code's provision. Britain would unwittingly spearhead efforts to legislate medical malpractice, establishing nomenclature and court decisions that would go on to become the ancestors of modern malpractice law.
Doctors typically require patients to sign a consent form detailing the risks of any given treatment or procedure. But signing a form alone does not necessarily prove that the patient gave informed consent. The doctor must actually discuss the procedure and risks with the patient. And the patient must understand, to the extent possible, the risks he or she faces.
The 10th US Court of Appeals reviewed various similar informed consent cases and found that courts took different views on whether or not lying to a patient about a physician's background could be considered a breach of informed consent. Some courts held that doctors could be found liable only if they lied regarding the risks of the proposed treatment. In this case, the appellate court decided that the patient should have had a chance to make the argument, and sent the case back for retrial on that issue.
Keep in mind, the standard of care differs from region to region and takes your doctor’s level of education and experience into account. As a result, a rural internist with a small private practice is not held to the same standard of care as a board-certified infectious disease specialist practicing in a cutting edge urban hospital. The well of knowledge and experience from which each doctor is drawing is vastly different.
"Mental illness" is a term applied ubiquitously, without discretion. "History of mental illness," applies even if an individual is relatively not amongst the most vulnerable - may even maintain positions of power himself or herself, society criminalizes all things psychological. That individual would be forever marked, especially thanks to the Internet, even if they took a bank of other psychiatrists to a courtroom to testify on their behalf.
The defendant is the health care provider. Although a 'health care provider' usually refers to a physician, the term includes any medical care provider, including dentists, nurses, and therapists. As illustrated in Columbia Medical Center of Las Colinas v Bush, 122 S.W. 3d 835 (Tex. 2003), "following orders" may not protect nurses and other non-physicians from liability when committing negligent acts. Relying on vicarious liability or direct corporate negligence, claims may also be brought against hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations or medical corporations for the mistakes of their employees and contractors.[8]
Unfortunately, just because one of these things occurs does not mean you have a claim. Medicine is not an exact science, and the law does not obligate doctors to be error-free 100 percent of the time. If doctor error occurs but there is no breach of a standard of care, you may not have a strong claim. If however, doctor error occurs and there is a breach of a standard of care, then malpractice may have occurred.

You must make your claim against the correct person or entity. In some cases, you would sue the doctor directly, but in other cases you might sue the hospital or health care system. In Washington, D.C. you have three years from the date of injury to file a medical malpractice lawsuit. You must make sure that you take action immediately when you have been injured at the hands of a trusted physician or another medical care provider.
A medical malpractice action must be commenced within one year after the cause of action accrues. However, if, at the time the injury occurs, the claimant is a minor or of unsound mind, the one-year statutes are tolled until the disability is removed (the minor reaches 18) Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2305.16. However, with the passage of time it can be more difficult to pursue the case as memories can fade or witnesses may have moved away. We recommend contacting our office right away for a free consultation to make sure you understand all of your rights and to have all of your questions answered.

Andrew W. Norfleet, Esquire Helping disabled individuals throughout Pennsylvania. awn@norlaflaw.com www.norlaflaw.com DISCLAIMER: This post is intended as general information applicable only to the state of Pennsylvania and is personal in nature, not professional in nature. The information given is based strictly upon the facts provided. This post is not intended to create an attorney client relationship, or to provide any specific guarantee of confidentiality


Whether a judge will conclude the case involves professional medical negligence or simply “standard” negligence is sometimes difficult to discern ahead of time. For example, if a medical technician leaves a guardrail too loose on a patient’s bed, is that professional medical negligence or standard negligence? Different courts have answered similar questions in different ways.

Certain types of serious hospital errors are totally preventable and should never occur, hence the name. Examples of never events include operating on the wrong body part, performing the wrong procedure on a patient, leaving a surgical tool in a patient or allowing a patient to develop pressure ulcers. Medicare has adopted a policy of refusing to pay for treatment that involves never events to put pressure of hospitals to do more to improve patient safety.
This is easy to calculate in terms of Morphine Equivalent Milligram Doses (aka – MME, MMD – there are plenty of free calculators out there) and the conversion is common in palliative and end of life care – it however is / was NOT common in non-cancer chronic pain patients, where it should be. This is how you get these results in the stories above of patients on abnormally high pill counts where they could have been switched from one med that was no longer controlling their pain to another that will (and there are enough different variants that they can continue this rotation as needed near – indefinitely in most patients).
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Our law firm has the resources to build a strong claim for maximum damages. As our legal team prepares claims for damages, we often collaborate with experts in such areas as medicine, vocational rehabilitation and economics, as well as such specialties as neuropsychology, geriatrics, pediatrics or child development, depending on the specific circumstances of the case. In appropriate cases and with the permission and assistance of our client, our damages presentation may also include the creation of a “day-in-the-life” video to illustrate the ways in which negligent medical care has changed our client’s life. Our team goes above and beyond to demonstrate what full and fair compensation should be for our clients.
The United States Government will pay $42 million to the parents of a young child who suffered a permanent brain injury, resulting from improper use of forceps during his delivery.  After a six day trial in Federal Court in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the verdict for $42 million was rendered by U.S. District Court Judge Sylvia Rambo.  The parents sued the Federal Government in a malpractice claim involving an Ob/Gyn physician, who was employed at a federal facility.  The lawsuit claimed that the doctor improperly used forceps on the baby’s head during the delivery, which caused skull fractures and bleeding on the brain that resulted in permanent brain damage.  Evidence presented during trial showed that the now five year old boy cannot speak, read or write and eventually will require a motorized wheelchair to get around.
Once a doctor initiates treatment of a patient, the doctor must not only terminate care at a proper time, but also in a proper manner. If a doctor transfers a patient to the care of a second doctor, the second doctor may not be familiar with crucial details of a patient's care. So, the first doctor has an ongoing obligation to provide the second doctor with proper instructions and all relevant records (treatment notes, test results, etc.). Failure to do so could rise to the level of medical malpractice.
Investigation: Before a case is even filed with the Connecticut courts, it is essential that an initial investigation of the matter be completed. Our team works with medical experts in the field to determine whether medical negligence was committed by your doctor or any other medical professional. Our lawyers then determine how that negligence caused your injury.
Cavendish ruled that a physician could be held liable if and when they harmed a patient as a result of negligence while stipulating that a physician who diligently adhered to the standard of care would not be liable even if he accomplished no cure. A legal precursor to expert testimony came in 1532, when a law passed under the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, requiring the opinion of medical men to be taken in cases of violent death. In 1768, Sir William Blackstone penned Commentaries on the Laws of England, in which he recruited the Latin term “mala praxis” to describe the concept of professional negligence, or ‘tort' in modern parlance. Blackstone noted that mala praxis “breaks the trust which the party had placed in his physician, and tends to the patient's destruction.” The proper term of ‘malpractice' was coined sometime thereafter, deriving from Blackstone's work.
Financial loss can include the future costs of caring for the patient. It can also include the patient’s future lost income where, as a result of the negligence, the patient is no longer able to work or to earn as much as he or she would otherwise.  Where a patient will need significant care support and will no longer be able to work, the amount of damages awarded when you bring a claim against the NHS or a hospital can be extremely high. 
You're extremely confident in your opinion. Have you considered the possibility that neither of you is interpreting reality on an objective level and that you are actually harming your son based on that absolutism? Saying that it's 100% true seems a bit off unless you have a photographic memory, especially when you think that they believe every word of his and are doing the wrong thing.
Of course, there is never any reason for any hospital to put patients at risk by offering negligent or inadequate diagnosis, treatment, or care. Hospitals are regulated and licensed under a number of state and federal laws, and hospitals must adhere to policies, standards, and procedures that enhance and protect the health and well-being of their patients. When a patient suffers injury or harm because a hospital’s employees have been negligent, the hospital may have legal liability.
After experiencing negligent medical care from a trusted physician or hospital, it can be difficult choosing an attorney from a sea of unknown names. The law firm you choose may be the most important decision you ever make about your case.  Ask each attorney you are considering how many medical malpractice cases they have actually tried. Then ask yourself, for the same fee, wouldn’t you rather have the experience and expertise of The O’Keefe Firm to represent you?
What she did NOT DO – WEAN THE DOSE OF FENTANYL PATCHES DOWN FIRST…. This was a COLD SWITCH – and being a “legitimate patient” I never assumed a doctor would ever – ever do this without some significant discussion, the audacity of a doctor to do this – knowing the impact, and knowing I have a job and a family (twins and 3 older children) and that ALL of the discussion with this doctor was centered around NOT causing a negative impact to work / family life – is just impressive to say the least…
A medical malpractice case isn't the kind of legal action you want to try handling on your own. These cases can get very complex from a legal, medical, and procedural standpoint. Proving your case is going to require not just a firm understanding of the law as it applies to your situation, but a familiarity with the kinds of hoops a medical malpractice plaintiff needs to jump through, including the retention of the right expert medical witness.
A doctor cannot terminate care of a patient when the patient is at a critical stage of treatment, solely because the patient is unable to pay for the care. However, if the patient is in a stable condition and is given ample warning of the termination, a doctor may be able to stop treatment. For example, in a 1989 case in Iowa called Surgical Consultants, P.C. v. Ball, a patient had gastric bypass surgery and suffered abscesses afterwards. She sought treatment from the operating physician, who saw her 11 times post-surgery but then refused to continue seeing her because she had not paid her bill. This was not considered abandonment because the patient was not considered to be at a critical stage of treatment.
In this article, we will discuss whether you can sue for medical malpractice years after treatment. The short answer is, yes, you can, since most states give you two to three years to bring a claim after malpractice occurs. The longer answer is, it depends on the type of injury and the state in which the claim is brought. Below, we will go through various examples of when the "countdown" begins for purposes of the statute of limitations deadline.
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As for your attempt to on the one hand to frame doctors as greedy drug dealers responsible for for most of this countries drug abuse, while at the same time trying to shame them into believing that theirs is a selfless avocation, some kind of priesthood where anyone not willing to martyr themselves to an ungrateful public, shouldn’t be able to practice. -Well i think you’d better put down whatever pills you’ve been swallowing, and come back to reality. Medicine is a profession, and its filled with human beings, not saints or demons. Human beings who will choose their own well being over that of a potential enemy every time just as YOU would. And greedy lawyers, unscrupulous patients, and unwitting juries all over this country are increasingly causing doctors to view their patients as potential enemies.
If you are considering medical tourism, discuss the possible risks with your American general practitioner and, if possible, a local attorney. If you have already undertaken to receive treatment from a foreign doctor, and have suffered an injury, you should discuss the particular details of your case with a qualified, experienced attorney. You will need to find an attorney that has experience not just with medical malpractice, but also with international legal disputes. Before undertaking any legal action against a foreign doctor, you should ask your attorney whether your claim will be worth the trouble of fighting an international legal battle. You may find that you do not have the same entitlements that you would when bringing a claim against an American doctor, and this might make a victory a hollow exercise and a waste of time and money.
I just don’t understand it here in UK, why is it so bad? I’m from Australia living in London and when i first registered for a doctor i was told i would have to wait 2 – 3 weeks. So you have to know in advance if you’re going to be sick? I had been terribly i’ll for 3 days , fever, vomiting, diarrhea etc, so i decided to go to a walk in clinic instead where after waiting 5 hours i was told that i didn’t really need to see a doctor and i would only be seeing a nurse. Upon explaining my symptoms the nurse she asked me if i had eaten out in the last 3 days, after i replied that i hadn’t eaten out at all, she just out of no where looked me straight in the face and said exactly this “Why are you trying to deny it could be something you have eaten?”. I was literally just speechless. Anyway a long story short, she prescribed me water. I then went across the road to the chemist and asked if they had anything to settle my stomach and diarrhea and she just looked at me and said you need to see a doctor, i literally just laughed.
Medical malpractice litigation has evolved dramatically since the Code of Hammurabi was written. Certain fundamental principles  –  namely, the responsibility of medical professionals to prevent unnecessary injury and death – remain unchanged. However, the legal landscape is constantly shifting. Major controversy surrounds how to best improve medical malpractice law and hospital culture so that medical professionals can truly focus on providing the best care to their patients. This was the idea behind many tort reform measures, but it remains unclear whether these changes actually improved patient care, or just stopped patients from obtaining the compensation they needed and were entitled to. ADR may be a win-win solution for patients and medical professionals, increasing case efficiency and decreasing animosity between opposing parties.
The defendant is the health care provider. Although a 'health care provider' usually refers to a physician, the term includes any medical care provider, including dentists, nurses, and therapists. As illustrated in Columbia Medical Center of Las Colinas v Bush, 122 S.W. 3d 835 (Tex. 2003), "following orders" may not protect nurses and other non-physicians from liability when committing negligent acts. Relying on vicarious liability or direct corporate negligence, claims may also be brought against hospitals, clinics, managed care organizations or medical corporations for the mistakes of their employees and contractors.[8]

Once a doctor initiates treatment of a patient, the doctor must not only terminate care at a proper time, but also in a proper manner. If a doctor transfers a patient to the care of a second doctor, the second doctor may not be familiar with crucial details of a patient's care. So, the first doctor has an ongoing obligation to provide the second doctor with proper instructions and all relevant records (treatment notes, test results, etc.). Failure to do so could rise to the level of medical malpractice.
Our medical malpractice lawyers have built a reputation for success. Wocl Leydon is recognized throughout the legal community for its commitment to aggressive litigation on behalf of deserving clients and families. As an AV rated Preeminent* law firm, we are recognized throughout the state for our ability to investigate the malpractice issues, present the detailed evidence of negligence necessary to establish a client’s right to compensation, and provide a documented damages calculation that can withstand a defense attorney’s attack. This reputation frequently earns us referrals from other attorneys as well as invitations to speak at legal seminars.
For instance, my friend battled to get through to her local practice last week. When she finally did, she was told that there were no appointments for the next three weeks! Of course, like most working people, she was after an evening appointment, which are a tad difficult to get hold of. Yet these are the slots that many of us want – in our 2009 survey, half of the 2,400 people we asked wanted appointments outside of 9am to 5pm.
In fact, filing a civil suit against your doctor does not even guarantee that he will be investigated. In order for your doctor to be investigated, a complaint would have to be filed against him with the New York State Department of Health. The Office of Professional Medical Conduct (“OPMC”) is responsible for investigating complaints about physicians, physician’s assistants, and specialist assistants. An investigation may lead to a formal hearing before a committee of the Board for Professional Medical Conduct.
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