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Medical Malpractice Florida Attorney | Medical Malpractice Hiscox

I had to change pain mgmt. clinics as the clinic I was in decided to implement a ceiling in terms of MME dosing that they are allowed to prescribe and I happened to be right at their ceiling (again – stable patient here, no changes on my side for 9yrs and they are the ones that put me in that dosing and it worked well – I know I’m a bit of a freak of nature in this way but there are people like me that can stay stable and not need frequent increases, though we are edge cases).
Many factors are taken into consideration when determining the level of compensation to which you are entitled. The severity of the injury is perhaps the most important factor. We are able to provide advice as to the reasonable value of your claim based on our years of experience in handling medical malpractice, nursing home negligence, personal injury and wrongful death cases. The following is a list of recent awards we obtained for our clients.
The Syracuse medical malpractice lawyers of Michaels & Smolak have recovered millions of dollars for clients injured by medical malpractice and for other injuries to cover their medical bills, lost earnings, pain and suffering, and more. If you or a loved one has been a victim of medical malpractice, contact us for a free consultation with an experienced lawyer who can inform you of your legal rights and maximize your compensation.

How can you tell the difference between appropriate, but unsuccessful care and medical malpractice? Ask. Ask your doctor. Get second opinions if possible. Talk to lawyers, who may have medically trained staff that can give an informed opinion, or who may have dealt with the exact same issue (or doctor) you are dealing with. Do whatever you can to attempt to allay any misgivings you have about your care. But take any opinions with a grain of salt. Some doctors simply won’t accuse a “brother physician” of making a mistake. Some malpractice attorneys will exaggerate the potential of your claim in an attempt to make money. Use your best discretion when seeking opinions on your treatment, but be diligent in the pursuit of information. Until you file a lawsuit, you are your own best advocate and investigator.


Regardless of the type of medical test performed, if the results are not communicated in a timely and appropriate manner and the patient subsequently suffers harm, it may form the basis of a medical malpractice lawsuit. Harm, however, must be suffered, as a patient who suffers no injury after a failed communication will probably have no basis for a lawsuit.


Not true! There are thousands of physicians sued successfully every year without ending in the loss of their licenses or practices. Although your doctor will have to spend some time defending the suit, throughout the process he will most likely still be able to see his patients and conduct his life as normal. Furthermore, after the conclusion of the suit, he will most likely go back to treating his patients – albeit, hopefully, more carefully this time.
I feel when I kept having to go back and back he would of figured something else was going on as a Trauma orthopedic doctor and he didn't. Plus he neveroffered me any physical therapy. My family doctor in December ordered it for me to go one time to see what I could do. The PT said my foot was really in bad shape as far as movement. Several of his paers also contradict themselves and so I feel I did not receive proper care from him. I had surgery in March from another doctor, and now it is almost a year with this whole ordeal which could of been done if he would of investigated my problems earlier.
Certain types of serious hospital errors are totally preventable and should never occur, hence the name. Examples of never events include operating on the wrong body part, performing the wrong procedure on a patient, leaving a surgical tool in a patient or allowing a patient to develop pressure ulcers. Medicare has adopted a policy of refusing to pay for treatment that involves never events to put pressure of hospitals to do more to improve patient safety.
The concept of permitting someone to recover damages for injuries caused by someone’s lack of action or failure to do something was a revolutionary concept. Since its recognition as an action in tort, negligence has become a major source of very large jury awards. It is the root of all product liability cases. When people complain about our legal system and the outrageous verdicts being awarded nowadays, they are speaking about negligence.
I think general practice should operate 08:00 – 20:00 every day including weekends and bank holidays. It does not automatically mean doctors, nurses and ancillary staff working longer hours overall. Nor does it mean that the same levels of staffing will be necessary throughout the opening hours and some weekday sessions might be reduced to allow for the additional weekend ones. Equally it should not require the full receptionist, pharmacist and other support services throughout the weekends. I don’t see any attempt at backdoor privatisation through this policy – doctors are already self-employed in any case. If patients want to have private medical treatment at their entire expense I don’t understand any objections to that and, to the extent that it takes some of the pressure off the NHS, it is probably a good thing on balance.
It isn’t surprising that you like your doctor. Otherwise, why else would you keep going back to him year after year? But so what? Liking your doctor shouldn’t keep you from suing him if he has caused you emotional and/or physical harm. Think about it – the legal system is around for a reason. It’s there to provide people with a way to receive compensation from someone who has harmed.
The number of hospital mistakes responsible for serious but non-fatal injuries is even higher. In the state of New York, can a medical malpractice law firm help you seek legal recourse if you are injured while you’re receiving care or treatment in a hospital? For those seeking justice in this state, the answer is yes. Hospital negligence leading to severe injury or death includes malpractice by doctors, nurses, physician’s assistants, nurse’s aides, and even technicians who work for the hospital.
Regardless of the type of medical test performed, if the results are not communicated in a timely and appropriate manner and the patient subsequently suffers harm, it may form the basis of a medical malpractice lawsuit. Harm, however, must be suffered, as a patient who suffers no injury after a failed communication will probably have no basis for a lawsuit.

I had to change pain mgmt. clinics as the clinic I was in decided to implement a ceiling in terms of MME dosing that they are allowed to prescribe and I happened to be right at their ceiling (again – stable patient here, no changes on my side for 9yrs and they are the ones that put me in that dosing and it worked well – I know I’m a bit of a freak of nature in this way but there are people like me that can stay stable and not need frequent increases, though we are edge cases).
Investigation: Before a case is even filed with the Connecticut courts, it is essential that an initial investigation of the matter be completed. Our team works with medical experts in the field to determine whether medical negligence was committed by your doctor or any other medical professional. Our lawyers then determine how that negligence caused your injury.

Once the Form 95 has been filed with the appropriate federal agency, then you must work with the agency to resolve your claim. There are a lot of pitfalls if you do not know what you are doing. If you cannot successfully resolve the claim administratively, you have the option of filing suit so long as you file within the appropriate limitations period. Our attorneys have decades of trial experience and are able to assist you in this process. Please contact us if you need a free evaluation of your claim. Once you have filed your form 95, you must wait at least 6 months (maybe more depending on the course of your administrative claim) before you can file a federal lawsuit.
An expert's opinion can be used in this situation as well, to show that the patient would have at least been made more comfortable and as stable as possible had the abandonment not occurred. On the other hand, if treatment would have had a significant chance of sustaining the patient's life, the family would probably have a more clear-cut case of medical malpractice case against the doctor.
If an expert testifies that a doctor had the opportunity to diagnose cancer earlier but failed (negligently) to do so, it would then have to be shown through complex medical evidence that the patient suffered additional harm. Proving that a delay in diagnosis lead to additional injury – death from cancer that otherwise may have been cured, or prolonged treatment and suffering that should have been avoided – is necessary to establish a medical malpractice claim.
Cost: Your prospective attorney should offer you a free consultation. Our consultations are always free. No client should be turned away from legal aid simply because they cannot afford a consultation fee. Once you have met with an attorney and have decided to hire him/her, you should discuss prospective costs of the case. In medical malpractice cases, clients frequently pay nothing upfront. In fact, a client only pays if they win their case. Usually, an attorney will work on a “contingency fee” basis, earning a percentage of the settlement or jury verdict. Be sure to ask your attorney whether she/he will be responsible for the costs of the litigation. The cost of litigating a case can easily run into the tens of thousands of dollars.
It is very common for an injured person to consult a lawyer saying ‘if Dr Smith had told me I would end up like this I would never have agreed to the procedure’.  While the saying ‘hindsight is always 20/20’ is often appropriate, there are situations where an injured person could and should sue their doctor or other professional for failing to warn them of significant risks of a procedure.
During the formative centuries of English common law after the critical Battle of Hastings in 1066, medical malpractice legislation began taking shape. The Court of Common Law shows several medical malpractice decisions on record. An 1164 case, Everad v. Hopkins saw a servant and his master collect damages against a physician for practicing "unwholesome medicine." The 1374 case Stratton v  Swanlond is frequently cited as the "fourteenth-century ancestor" of medical malpractice law. Chief Justice John Cavendish presided over the case, in which one Agnes of Stratton and her husband sued surgeon John Swanlond for breach of contract after he failed to treat and cure her severely mangled hand. Stratton saw her case ultimately dismissed due to an error in the Writ of Complaint, however, the case served as a crucial cornerstone in setting certain standards of medical care.
Once the claimant has satisfied the pre-suit investigation and notice requirements, the claimant may be able to file a medical malpractice lawsuit in the Florida court system. In order to prevail in a medical negligence case against a doctor, the claimant has the burden of proof. This burden may be difficult to meet, given that there is often a presumption that the doctor acted reasonably and properly under the circumstances.
Have you complied with your statute of limitations? Sometimes we have to tell veterans and service members that we cannot help them because they did not contact us soon enough. If you have a medical malpractice claim against an Army, Navy, or Air Force military hospital, you should contact us as soon as possible because your statute of limitations runs out.
A physician would be insane to risk his hard earned career by continuing to prescribe controlled substances to all the pts who cross his threshold. Physicians already place their pts’ health above their self interests. What profession do you know of that you are regularly expected to miss holidays and special occasions? Work long shifts overnight? Law, business, engineering? I think it’s reasonable to say that a pts’ wellbeing should not supersede my ability to lead a somewhat normal life and provide for my family (who did not take the Hippocratic Oath).
The medical industry uniquely benefits from broad autonomy and self-regulation. Standardization of care and general oversight work to balance physician autonomy, and some may say they even erode that autonomy to an extent. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) enforce patterns of practice to which providers must adhere. Emerging technologies throughout the 20th century paved the way for new treatment methods, but they also “raised patient expectations [while] multiplying the possibilities for mishaps.” In an examination of the interplay of autonomy and oversight, the Drexel Law Review wrote "Standardization and oversight serve to further reinforce patient expectations. By way of contrast, a disorganized profession typified by idiosyncratic practices discourages perceptions of consistent quality. Formal organization of the medical profession was intended, in part, to counter this characterization.”
I happen to agree with your statement about there being a possibility for future cancer patients not getting the treatment they need if I was to take further action. But I wonder what exactly makes you assume that I am “living on welfare looking for even more “free money””? Ever consider that my cancer diagnosis wasn’t the only reason I am on disability? And really?? Did you read the post where I said I’m okay with coming off the meds? Its difficult, yes. But i have a choice every day to simply call up any unscrupulous doctor and get a prescription any time I want. I don’t do that. I’m sticking with the doctor who is weening me, because I believe it needs to be done. All you seem to have read was that I want more medicine, when I don’t.
Losing a loved one is never easy, especially when the loss could have been avoided. Often in cases of medical malpractice, those who are left behind after a loved one's passing wonder why the doctor is not going to jail for murder. Is it possible for one to charge a doctor with murder when their treatment of a patient was so poor as to result in death?
In most cases, a hospital is liable in the legal sense only if an employee’s negligence or incompetence results in injury to a patient. A medical malpractice lawsuit may be the proper course of action if a nurse, an aide, a technician, or any other hospital employee injures a patient by negligently performing or failing to perform a job-related task.
The United States Government will pay $42 million to the parents of a young child who suffered a permanent brain injury, resulting from improper use of forceps during his delivery.  After a six day trial in Federal Court in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the verdict for $42 million was rendered by U.S. District Court Judge Sylvia Rambo.  The parents sued the Federal Government in a malpractice claim involving an Ob/Gyn physician, who was employed at a federal facility.  The lawsuit claimed that the doctor improperly used forceps on the baby’s head during the delivery, which caused skull fractures and bleeding on the brain that resulted in permanent brain damage.  Evidence presented during trial showed that the now five year old boy cannot speak, read or write and eventually will require a motorized wheelchair to get around.
In Michigan, you must file a medical malpractice lawsuit to sue a hospital within two years of the date of the medical malpractice or medical negligence. There are only a very few number of exceptions to this rule so it is important to consult with an experienced medical malpractice attorney as soon as possible to discuss your case. If you miss a deadline, your claim will be lost forever.
While it’s impossible to know to what extent Aanning’s testimony influenced the outcome, the jury sided in favor of his colleague — and, ever since, Aanning said, he has felt haunted by his decision. Now, 77 and retired, he decided to write about his choice and why he made it in a recent column for his local newspaper, The Yankton County Observer. He also posted the article in the ProPublica Patient Safety Facebook group. Aanning, who is a member, called it, “A Surgeon’s Belated Confession.”
My problem now is I feel like a shell of who I was, a very successful sale manager earning 6 figures+ to now, not being able to hold a job and being on disability. I can't remember things or conversations that I have had. I can't be in places where there are too many people, forget a mall or a nice restaurant. My wife and daughter have affectionately resorted to nicknaming me "turtle" because I can't keep up. I just roll with it but it really hurts knowing I was once the sole provider of a very nice lifestyle for my family to becoming this exhausted, tired, uninterested person. I speak with no one, I have not 1 friend and for the most part, never leave the house. My brain feels scrambled all the time, foggy.
pauline- the official line and the one I was forced to travel as part of NHS diversification is that you MUST visit an optician ,not necessarily the one you have been attending . Get an eye test and if they find anything wrong with your eyes that they as opticians cant sort they will recommend you to an NHS eye clinic . They will send you an appointment card to attend hospital and do tests on your eyes , this might take several visits but then they will advise the next NHS treatment . I should know I went through all that and still attend . So dont start with a GP appointment you will only be told to visit an optician ,once the optician sends in his report they MUST act -full stop !
For example, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals held that a Fort Bragg Army Sergeant was injured while he was driving after a mandatory physical training exercise to his on-base residence to shower and change clothes before reporting to his next duty assignment was active duty and was barred from suing under Feres. Courts generally hold that an off-duty, but not on leave service member injured in a car wreck is barred from suit by Feres.
Firstly , WebMD won't help at all (hasn't really helped anyone). Secondly here's the catch: Every doctor lies slightly. Most doctors don't prescribe spot-on medications , just ones that'll do the job and which pay them better. But don't think your doc is a golden-eyed business tycoon. They do their jobs very well. But to know if he/she is lying much out of range , consult a more experienced doctors or someone whose practice years exceed your doc. If your suspicion is right , you can even sue the doctor if you want lol. Just kidding. Go with personal opinions and choose one who has been actually effective for a larger no of people ( and I don't mean those paid smiley faces on billboards and light parties ).

Why is it important to differentiate between malpractice and simply poor doctoring? Because in a successful malpractice case, the patient can recover money damages to compensate for injury, including emotional harm. Alternatives to a malpractice lawsuit include filing a human rights complaint, filing a complaint with the psychiatrist’s employer, filing an ethics charge against the psychiatrist, writing negative online reviews for the psychiatrist, or speaking with the psychiatrist directly. However, these alternatives will not provide recompense to the patient for any harm inflicted.


Doctors' groups, patients, and insurance companies have criticized medical malpractice litigation as expensive, adversarial, unpredictable, and inefficient. They claim that the cost of medical malpractice litigation in the United States has steadily increased at almost 12 percent annually since 1975.[27] More recent research from the same source has found that tort costs as a percentage of GDP dropped between 2001 and 2009, and are now at their lowest level since 1984.[28] Jury Verdict Research, a database of plaintiff and defense verdicts, says awards in medical liability cases increased 43 percent in 1999, from $700,000 to $1,000,000. However, more recent research from the U.S. Department of Justice has found that median medical malpractice awards in states range from $109,000 to $195,000.[29]
Recently I've been trying to get my medications reduced. When I switched Dr.'s he could not believe the medications and does the previous Dr. had me on. Currently, I am taking (100 mg X 2 of Zoloft), (0.1 X 3 of Clonidine), (2mg X 3 per day Xanax), (300mg X 1 Seroquel XR). These medications have been increased or were prescribed in this amount and after being rushed to the Hospital after what the Doctors believe was a seizure or mild stroke my wife started looking into the interactions of my medications and I was taken off of (Wellbutrin XL 300), (Hydroxyzine PAM 50mg X 2 per day), (Vyvanse 60mg), (Temazepam 30mg), (Duloxetine 60mg).
In this article, we will discuss whether you can sue for medical malpractice years after treatment. The short answer is, yes, you can, since most states give you two to three years to bring a claim after malpractice occurs. The longer answer is, it depends on the type of injury and the state in which the claim is brought. Below, we will go through various examples of when the "countdown" begins for purposes of the statute of limitations deadline.
I find it impossible that he does not know about my illness. He has 23 yrs of Experience. Commercials about my condition are every other day and the medication he refused to give is on all the time. that been said, it is not possible that he does not know from a common sense perspective, putting that aside, he did not bother to ask about my symptoms so he can prescribe something for the symptoms he knows. That is neglect. I told him that I take a med that suppresses the immune system, he could have done blood labs to check for infections or just to humor me or put me at ease until I get another doc.
There are lots of laws applicable to punish physicians who make affirmative bad judgments as to medical care and treatment. But there is no law that affirmatively compels a physician to prescribe or provide medication that the physician does not believe is in the patient's best interests. This doctor told you that he lacks the knowledge to conclude that the drug you wanted was correct for a patient in your circumstances. Given that fact, he had no legal choice but to decline to provide that drug.
Of course, these questions get even more murky when talking about the legal system of a foreign country. Some nations may not recognize rights to sue by foreigners. Others may bog down in administrative red tape far thicker than anything found in an American court. Some estimate cases for malpractice brought in foreign nations could take 20 years or more to resolve. Worse yet, some nations may try to transfer jurisdiction back to the United States and the US may refuse to accept it, creating a legal back and forth leaving the parties in limbo.
I see why malpractice insurance is high. I think in many cases it's the attitude that goes along with the malpractice that leads to legal action being taken. I understand that that's not always the case, and sometimes it is simply an accident. However, I know in my family's situation had there been even a tiny morsel of remorse by the physician who treated my grandfather he wouldn't have had to travel to the state capitol. Misreading the fuzzy xray may have been an accident, but sending my grandfather home unable to walk or care for himself, in terrible pain with no pain medication for his broken hip was not an accident. We didn't profit from it, but the physician did have to get an attorney/attorneys when he faced the medical board - so you can blame people like him for the increase in your rates. Had he said he was sorry and not been such an a-- to my grandfather he wouldn't have had to go try to defend himself. He lost, by the way. Had to pay a fine and take some classes. He probably deserved more than he got, but it was something.
An August 2003 National Bureau of Economic Research paper by Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra found that (1) "increases in malpractice payments made on behalf of physicians do not seem to be the driving force behind increases in premiums"; (2) "increases in malpractice costs (both premiums overall and the subcomponent factors) do not seem to affect the overall size of the physician workforce, although they may deter marginal entry, increase marginal exit, and reduce the rural physician workforce"; and (3) "there is little evidence of increased use of many treatments in response to malpractice liability at the state level, although there may be some increase in screening procedures such as mammography."[49]
You're extremely confident in your opinion. Have you considered the possibility that neither of you is interpreting reality on an objective level and that you are actually harming your son based on that absolutism? Saying that it's 100% true seems a bit off unless you have a photographic memory, especially when you think that they believe every word of his and are doing the wrong thing.

Medical malpractice among doctors is a serious issue nationwide. If you have been injured as a result of a serious medical mistake, you should seek legal consultation to discuss filing a medical malpractice claim against your doctor. Proving medical malpractice is not always easy and often requires the expert testimony of another health care provider, who must testify that medical negligence occurred in your case.
We consider all cases on a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA), also known as a No Win No Fee agreement. This means that if you are not successful in pursuing your claim, we will not charge you any of our base legal costs. If we are successful with your claim, we submit the costs which we have incurred in pursuing the claim to the defendant/s and or their insurers. We are also entitled to charge a success fee, which will be deducted from your recoverable damages at the end of the claim. However, we can offer a competitive success fee and our aim will always to beat a success fee offer by any other firm. This means that we aim to beat the terms offered by other law firms and you will receive more of your compensation.
The concept of permitting someone to recover damages for injuries caused by someone’s lack of action or failure to do something was a revolutionary concept. Since its recognition as an action in tort, negligence has become a major source of very large jury awards. It is the root of all product liability cases. When people complain about our legal system and the outrageous verdicts being awarded nowadays, they are speaking about negligence.
In addition, if they lose the civil and/or criminal case it makes it easier for the patient to get the medical board to take action against the physician, rarely causing them to lose their license but maybe forcing them to take classes, pay a fine, they have to travel to the state capitol, the embarrassment of being dressed down by their peers, etc.
Doctors typically require patients to sign a consent form detailing the risks of any given treatment or procedure. But signing a form alone does not necessarily prove that the patient gave informed consent. The doctor must actually discuss the procedure and risks with the patient. And the patient must understand, to the extent possible, the risks he or she faces.
Typically, nurses, medical technicians, and support staff are hospital employees. As long as the employee was doing something job-related when he or she caused an injury to a patient, the patient can usually sue the hospital for resulting damages. For example, if a registered nurse (R.N.) employed by the hospital injects the wrong medication into an IV "push," and the patient ends up suffering harm as a result, then the hospital could probably be considered liable for the R.N.'s mistake.
If someone is an employee of a hospital, the hospital is typically responsible (liable) if that employee hurts a patient by acting incompetently. In other words, if the employee is negligent (is not reasonably cautious when treating or dealing with a patient), the hospital will usually be on the hook for any resulting injuries to the patient. (Keep in mind that not every mistake or unfortunate event that happens in a hospital rises to the level of negligence. To learn more about what constitutes medical malpractice, read Nolo's article Medical Malpractice Basics. )
A hospital can be held liable for the negligence of its employees. Typically,  nurses are hospital employees. And in some cases, medical technicians and paramedics are also employed by a hospital. As long as the employee was doing something job-related when he or she injured the patient (who would be the plaintiff in the case), the plaintiff can sue the hospital over the injury.

Sue -thats a painful condition ,hope you dont need it taken out as it isnt a small operation ,at least not in my day when a female relative had to get her,s removed ,big scar. It did mean she had to watch what she eat after that . Your post interests me because of the 2 week wait and I am doing a survey to see if camerons unofficial –treat young people first– is the reason . I dont want to know your age but does this aspect apply to you. ? I dont frequent GP,s surgeries usually keeping a “stiff upper lip ” but I thought at least I would get sent to a hospital for stones in the kidney,s ,it took a week to pass them ,you can imagine the pain ,all he gave me were pills and “keep drinking “I thought that was the “end ” .


The third element that must be established to sue NHS hospitals and doctors in a clinical negligence / medical negligence case is damages, ie the amount of compensation the patient should receive. The amount of damages will depend on a variety of factors, the most important of which are the patient’s pain and suffering and the financial loss the patient has incurred and will incur.
An adult who is injured at a New York City municipal hospital has ninety days from the date of the injury to file a medical malpractice claim. Claims for injured children, however, may be filed until three years past the victim’s 18th birthday, but legal action must still take place within ten years from the date of the malpractice incident and injury.
Not every medical error is preventable.  And despite taking every available precaution, you may still be exposed to medical error.  In the event you are harmed by a medical error, you may be concerned for your health, frightened by the possible consequences, angry at the mistake, or any combination of these and other powerful emotions.  In this state, you may not know what to do next or how to report the incident.  In the following article, InjuryBoard provides you with an easy to understand guide explaining what to do when you’re injured by a doctor’s mistake and how you can help prevent others from suffering in the same way.
Yahoo fait partie d’Oath. Oath et ses partenaires ont besoin de votre consentement pour accéder à votre appareil et utiliser vos données, notamment votre position géographique, afin de comprendre vos centres d’intérêt, de diffuser des publicités personnalisées et de mesurer leur efficacité. Oath vous présentera également des publicités personnalisées sur les produits de ses partenaires. En savoir plus.
In addition to notifying a health care provider that you intend to file a lawsuit, prior to filing suit in most jurisdictions, the injured patient must usually submit an affidavit or certificate from a qualified expert. This affidavit or certificate is usually completed by another doctor who can testify that there are reasonable grounds to determine that medical negligence or medical malpractice took place in a given case. Again, the exact requirements of the certificate vary from state to state and across jurisdictions.
Medical negligence occurs when a doctor or other medical professional breaches the standard of care. In general, a standard of care is the accepted methods of treatment applied by other medical professionals in the area to patients with identical or similar conditions. A standard of care will vary depending on a number of factors, including geographic area, the age of the patient, and the medical condition.
The next step is to prove that the defendant doctor breached the standard of care. What should the doctor have done, and what was actually done? For example, if the standard of care required the doctor to refer the patient to a specialist before terminating the doctor-patient relationship, failure to do so would constitute a breach of the standard of care. The expert's opinion comes into play at this stage as well, painting a picture of how the care provided was sub-standard under the circumstances.

Back surgery remains a highly controversial area of surgical medicine and the ambiguity of the outcomes supports why some surgeons are extremely conservative in identifying good surgical candidates. The first surgeon did not find you to be a good surgical candidate, the second one did. "proving" that surgeon #1 lied to you may assuage your outrage, but does nothing to further your case or your health and it's likely to fail in court. So my opinion, move on. Best of luck.

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