free
hit counter
Medical Malpractice Houston | Medical Malpractice Eye Surgery

A 2011 study appearing in the Journal of the American College of Radiology revealed that the legal costs to doctors for failing to communicate diagnostic test results rose by $70 million from 1991 to 2010 across all specialties. The lead study author stated that communication failure can happen at any level. Three scenarios, however, were identified as the leading causes of communication problems:
My Standard and Required Legal Disclaimer. The information given by me here is not legal advice. You should not and may not rely on anything on this website as legal advice and you agree that the nominal price you may pay for information here clearly does not pay for any legal advice. I am neither establishing nor accepting an attorney-client relationship with you. You must hire an attorney in your state as a matter of law, in order to receive legal advise and attorney/client relationship and rights. I do not claim to be licensed to practice in the state where this information is being provided or whose law would apply, if any. My licensing credentials are noted in my profile, which you have full access to. As law is always changing, you are recommended to speak with the appropriate legal counsel for accurate and complete information. Thank you and have a great day.

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. If we do not win, you will not be responsible for attorney's fees, court costs, or litigation expenses. If you do win, these expenses and unpaid medical bills will be taken from your share of the recovery.
The doctor's negligence caused the injury. Because many malpractice cases involve patients that were already sick or injured, there is often a question of whether what the doctor did, negligent or not, actually caused the harm. For example, if a patient dies after treatment for lung cancer, and the doctor did do something negligent, it could be hard to prove that the doctor's negligence caused the death rather than the cancer. The patient must show that it is "more likely than not" that the doctor's incompetence directly caused the injury. Usually, the patient must have a medical expert testify that the doctor's negligence caused the injury.
Andrew W. Norfleet, Esquire Helping disabled individuals throughout Pennsylvania. awn@norlaflaw.com www.norlaflaw.com DISCLAIMER: This post is intended as general information applicable only to the state of Pennsylvania and is personal in nature, not professional in nature. The information given is based strictly upon the facts provided. This post is not intended to create an attorney client relationship, or to provide any specific guarantee of confidentiality
While an investigation against your doctor could lead to the revocation of his license, such action is rare. Only in the most extreme cases, where the Board feels that your doctor is a threat to the well-being of his patients, will his or her license be revoked. The Board could decide to take lesser action such as limiting his license, issuing a censure and reprimand, or require him or her to attend training.

There was a violation of the standard of professional conduct - The law acknowledges that there are certain legal standards that are recognized by the profession as being acceptable conduct. These standards of professional conduct are largely determined by the ethics rules of the state bar association. Attorneys have an obligation to their clients and the bar to operate within these standards. Clients have the right to expect attorneys will follow the law, behave in an ethical and honest manner, act in the best interests of their clients with integrity, diligence and good faith, and will execute their matters at a level of competency that protects their legal rights. Lawyers must also maintain and supply clients with full and detailed reports of all money and/or property handled for them. Finally, attorneys must not inflict damage on third parties through frivolous litigation or malicious prosecution. If it is determined that the standards of professional conduct have been violated, then negligence may be established.

Whether a judge will conclude the case involves professional medical negligence or simply “standard” negligence is sometimes difficult to discern ahead of time. For example, if a medical technician leaves a guardrail too loose on a patient’s bed, is that professional medical negligence or standard negligence? Different courts have answered similar questions in different ways.
This means that if a psychiatrist properly diagnoses and treats a condition, gives the correct medication and monitors it properly, the patient can still go after the doctor if she experiences a 1 in 10,000 complication simply by saying, "If I had known X about my doctor I would have chosen to be treated by someone else." Remember there is nothing in the appellate opinion to limit the range of potential background questions. We are focussing on his responses to direct questions by the patient, but the opinion wasn't really designed to delineate what duties (if any) are owed when patients ask personal questions. The appellate opinion just opens the door, and I'm raising the 'what if' questions.
Even if you are not eligible for legal aid, you should only use a solicitor who is a member of the Law Society Clinical Negligence Panel and whose firm is accredited by the Legal Services Commission to undertake legally aided clinical negligence work. Only law firms with significant expertise and experience are able to offer legal aid, so this is a good way to verify the credentials of your medical negligence solicitor.
In states using this second standard, courts ask whether a normal patient, with the same medical history and conditions as the plaintiff, would have changed his or her mind about the treatment if the risk was disclosed. Unlike states following the first standard, a doctor must also inform a patient of realistic alternative treatments, even if the doctor only recommends one treatment.

If you file a complaint with the medical board and then file suit, know that the medical board can only take administrative action against the doctor’s license to practice medicine. It can’t help you pursue a medical malpractice case. It also can’t disclose any information that it collects during the course of its review with you or your family members.


Suing a doctor for negligence requires much more than just filing a lawsuit in a Florida court. One of the prerequisites to filing a lawsuit against the doctor requires that you must first provide him or her with notice, indicating that you intend to file a lawsuit in the near future. A 90-day waiting period follows, during which the doctor may reject the claim outright, offer to settle the case, or ask to submit the case to arbitration.

Medical malpractice is not dependent on a poor result, and a poor result does not always constitute negligence. The practice of medicine is an inexact art, and there are no guarantees that any course of treatment. But doctors do make mistakes, and some of those mistakes rise to the level of medical malpractice. So what, exactly, constitutes negligent treatment by a physician?


Your attorney can help you determine whether you were the victim of  medical malpractice. Attorneys conduct independent medical research with the assistance of physicians and nurses to determine whether medical negligence occurred. A poor medical outcome alone does not automatically mean medical malpractice was committed. In order to receive compensation, you must prove that the defendant failed to provide reasonable care. Please feel free to call usanytime for free a consultation to help you get your questions answered.
This Health Policy Report describes the malpractice system in the United States, examines its shortcomings, and analyzes the forces that have led to past and current malpractice crises. The authors review options for reform of the U.S. malpractice system. Conventional tort reforms include caps on damages, limits on attorneys' fees, and shortening of the statute of limitations. Experts have also proposed major system reforms, such as enterprise liability or administrative compensation.
Bipolar symptoms dont normally “go away ” without some mental help , either of drugs or as an outpatient in a hospital but as you say you have to be diagnosed first Bez to get treatment . Your doctor , unless he has degrees in psychiatry has not the qualifications to judge and must refer you to a specialist . If you are refused treatment there are many mental health charities that I can provide to take up your case . Go down to the surgery , kick up a fuss about it , at the very least it will get them thinking and get beyond the “SS” guard at the reception . I have on many occasions had to be strong in my communications with surgeries to get help both for me and my wife , I dont take no for an answer when it comes to health luckily the message sinks in and it has saved my life and my wife,s on several occasions. Get back and let me know how you get on Bez , I know about depression etc and also the serious effects it an have on your life .

Your attorney should also disclose “bad facts” in the opening statement.[20] A bad fact is anything the defense would want to bring to the jury’s attention because it makes the defense case much stronger. For example, your failure to follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment is a bad fact. By disclosing bad facts first, your attorney can take the sting out of them.


I was referred to a GI about my chronic condition that is out of control. when I got through all the red tape and hassle that comes along with Medi-cal I was able to finally go to the appointment. When I got there he refused to treat me or give the most important medication I needed. He said that he does not have experience in my condition because the Asian community rarely has cases of this condition (He is asian and I am not). I told him I am in urgent need for my medications but he said he cannot help and that I need to see another GI. I think he refused because I have Medi-cal because he made a couple of comments on my insurance. and some racism might be involved because of the Asian comment he made and the fact that all the ppl in the waiting room were asian.

Chris Archer, the chief executive of South African Private Practitioners Forum, says it is fashionable for health practitioners to blame lawyers for the increase in malpractice cases, but the working conditions of many health professionals also play a role. “Many health professionals work in solo practices or small partnerships without professional support or routine peer review. There is limited use of protocols and guidelines and little to no teamwork among private practitioners,” he says.
Doctors must abide by what is called “the duty of informed consent”. This means that a doctor is obligated by law and by professional ethics to warn patients of all known risks of a procedure or course of treatment. If a patient who had been properly informed of risks and potential side-effects would have elected not to proceed, the doctor MAY be liable for medical malpractice. Similarly, if the patient is injured by the procedure – or during the course of treatment – in a way that the doctor should have warned could happen but didn’t, the doctor may be liable for medical malpractice.
Copyright 2018 Rocket Lawyer Incorporated. Rocket Lawyer provides information and software only. Rocket Lawyer is not a "lawyer referral service" and does not provide legal advice or participate in any legal representation. Rocket Lawyer is not a law firm or a substitute for an attorney or law firm. Use of Rocket Lawyer is subject to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
I thought my first encounter with my new psychiatrist was traumatic but after reading everyone's comments I don't feel like I was abused as badly as so many of you were. I am doing research because this doctor was so rude and unprofessional that I actually was traumatized when I left his office after our first session. After reading and doing some research I have found that unfortunately I can not sue him for medical malpractice but you can bet I am going to report him to every medical organization I can. I have already gone to the hospital and spoken to upper management and they have forced him to prescribe my medication in the correct quantity after he lied to me in session and told me he could only prescribe a 30 day quantity. How am I supposed to make it through the other 2 months before my next appointment with him if I only have a 30 day supply? Idiot. He was irritated with me because even though he had my chart (my regular doctor abruptly left her practice 8 days before my scheduled appointment with her) and I was shuffled to this clown and they sent all my records to him (or so they said). He kept asking ME which of the meds listed on my chart were my psych meds and got irritated when I told him I didn't know. That's when I started to get nervous. If he was a real doctor, how is it he couldn't pick out the psych meds from everything else on my list? He asked me why I was taking so many anti-depressants. I thought to myself--that's a stupid question-I am the patient, I didn't prescribe them so how would I be able to even begin to answer that question? He explained that giving anti-depressants to a bipolar was like giving them rocket fuel. Then he snickered and said that maybe I had pissed off my last doctor( I suppose as an explanation for why she was overmedicating me and according to his opinion after seeing me for all of 15 minutes that I was too manic) As he perused my chart he saw something he didn't like and he said, "Shit!" I thought ok, that wasn't very professional. As he proceeded to ask questions, when I answered them (or I should say tried to answer them) he would interrupt me when he felt he'd gotten the information he needed and he'd say, " ok, that's all I need to know". He cut me off mid-sentence repeatedly as if I was wasting his time and he wanted me to just shut up once he got what he wanted for his purposes. One of my conditions is bipolar and somehow the question of being highly sexual came up and he said, "Oh, so you were promiscuous." I have never had anyone use that kind of terminology to describe that particular symptom. I have read books, magazines, done on-line research about bipolar ever since my diagnosis and I have not encountered that wording to describe the condition. I was shocked to hear a doctor use that term. I felt like he had called me a whore. At least that's how I felt. He asked me about working with other doctors and I shared that I had one doctor who never shared or gave any feedback and he laughed and said, "Well, then you won't like me, because I don't give feedback either." I thought to myself, how is it funny that a psychiatrist doesn't give a patient any kind of feedback at all? How is he going to now how my meds are working or if they aren't, and how am I supposed to know the same thing if he never interacts with me?" The icing on the cake was when he abruptly stopped speaking in the middle of his instructions about my meds and said, "OK, time's up, our session is over." I was so surprised I really had no idea what to say. I sat there for a minute trying to collect myself and to see if he was serious and he just kept staring at me, so I said,"Um, well, if you think it's not important to give me instructions on my meds, then I guess I have to leave since you are telling me to go." I was floundering at this point because I honestly had no idea what I was going to do. They tell you to take your meds, take your meds, take your meds, because it is so important that you stay on your regime once your doctor gets you started, and so many people with bipolar stop once they feel better, but I knew how wild my life had been before I was finally diagnosed so I am totally dedicated to staying on medications and here was my doctor kicking me out of his office without my meds. I was totally freaked out. Then he said, "No, I'm going to finish giving you your instructions, but I wanted to make a point of it that you were late and that now you are cutting into my next patient's time. I had been on time but I did stop at the desk to write my co-pay which took all of maybe 2 or 3 minutes. He finished his instructions to me and as I was leaving he said, "Remember, if you want respect, you have to give respect." And then he instructed me to be early to my next visit. I suppose to be sure that I didn't spend 3 minutes writing out my co-pay. I was so freaked out, I felt like a criminal for almost three days because I believed I had been so bad. Thank goodness, I've had several good doctors over the years, and as I processed it more and more I started to get angry. Really, really angry. I won't even go into the run around I got from the sorry excuse they have for a patient liason who was absolutely no help. As a matter of fact, after dealing with her, I was even angrier. I was torn between pursuing the matter further or just letting it go because I knew I was going to run out of meds in 30 days and then what? But this week after seeing my talk therapist and being able to compare my reactions to hers, I realized that HE was the one who had been wildly inappropriate and that he had been unprofessional, rude, and actually, just downright mean. I have no idea why people like that are even allowed to practice medicine. Especially the kind of medicine where they can really mess someone up with medication and with inappropriate or cruel behavior. So I drove to the hospital, demanded to see anyone who was not that excuse for a patient liason, got a printed copy of my patient's rights (which I did not know existed had I not seen them posted on the wall at the front desk when I went in that day) They called and I got to speak to someone in risk management (so apparently the patient liason person lied to me when she said she did not report to anyone and refused to let me have the corporate address and said they only people above her were the doctors and they would not want to speak to me about my issue)
Many people don’t bring a meritorious lawsuit against their doctor because of fear concerning family and friends. Only you can decide for yourself whether bringing a lawsuit against your physician is the right thing for you to do. Only you know the pain and suffering that you have endured – nobody else. Only you know the extent of your lost wages, medical bills, and injury.
×