free
hit counter
Medical Malpractice Attorney Fresno | Medical Malpractice Hernia Operation

DJ I understand where you are coming from, and I also understand those that dont agree with you. I have 3 bulging disc/ degenerative disc disease. Until the age of 30 I never touched an opiate or abused anything for that matter. My injury stemmed for a high school sports injury, but I dealt with the pain by eating right, exercising and took a Tylenol when needed. At the age of 30 the pain started getting much worse I because my job and the businesses I owned demanded me to work long hours and were physically demanding. So when I just couldnt take it any longer I went to the doctor who prescribed me percocets for about 3 or 4 months and then referred me to pain mgmt. I really liked the doctor, he was kind, compassionate, empathetic, smart and unrelated he was interested in me as a person, he actually visited a few of my businesses, we didn’t hang out or anything but I thought of him as a friend in a way but understood we weren’t. So now that you understand this I want to make it very clear I never tried to take advantage of that, not once did I ever ask for a certain medication. I just felt blessed that I had a doctor that actually cared for my well being and that I was not just a jane doe diagnosed and treated by the statistics. He started me off with oxy and injections. The injections were not working so long story short we tried a wide variety of meds, most either didn’t work for me or I had an adverse reaction to. Finally after a few years I was put on opana and oxy and it worked. The problem was his practice got busy and so did he. The result was he was still nice but he did all the talking and it was mostly like”its been a couple months on this dose your tolerance has increased so let’s up your dosage”, until I was at 30mg opana 2x day and 30mg oxy 3x day. Things were fine for awhile but the drugs start to change my temperament. My work started to suffer, my relationships also were becoming strained, because my whole life revolved around my medications, yes I was pain free but at what cost? So here lies the the million dollar question. Who’s fault is it? Mine for wanting to be pain free and trusting that my doctor giving more and more was in my best interest, yes in a way it is my fault for being nieve to the fact I was going to beable to pop these powerful drugs for the rest of my life. So the government decides to crack down and me on this insane amount of opiates and doc takes meds away, what a sick cruel joke on me. So now knowing what I know, my doctor put me on opana because of kickbacks and kept increasing dosage because of $ and I know this because a majority of his patients are in the same boat, they topped out and all is fine till the government cracked down and doc got scared, reduced or dropped patient and we all are so surprised why the US is now flooded with heroin addicts. So my opinion is the doctors that were prescribing ridiculously large amounts to fatten there pockets, even if they weren’t doing for the kickbacks, and used tolerance or whatever, we trusted that they would have been smart enough to see what was happening in this country and when the government once again passed legislation without thinking about the result of there actions, these doctors would have a game plan, but no they all held up there hands and want to blame it on anybody but themselves. Shame on you doctor’s that liked playing the game while you were winning but quit and ran home crying when the rules of the game changed, that is why I hold you doctors responsible, and I do feel bad for the good ones that get fucked in the process, but didn’t us patients with real pain get fucked by doctor shoppers? Stand up for yourselves, get oganized and counter sued the government for passing legislation(unrealistic restrictions without making sure these poor people have a realistic way to get off theses doses safely, at no cost. Isn’t funny how these pill pushing doctor’s do a 180 because the big money can’t be made by having their patients hooked on powerful opiates so they jump ship accusing them off being addicts dropping them and putting them on suboxane which is not a pain medication and wonder why they have no choice but to become heroin addicts. I blame the doctors for turning us into pill addicts but I blame the government for turning us into heroin addicts. In the end tne patient loses because whoever is at fault the patient will suffer
It’s vital to note, however, that the prosecution of medical malpractice cases—in addition to having a high likelihood of failure—can be extremely expensive, stressful and time-consuming. It’s estimated that medical errors kill roughly 200,000 patients in the U.S. each year. Yet only 15% of the personal-injury lawsuits filed annually involve medical-malpractice claims, and more than 80% of those lawsuits end with no payment whatsoever to the injured patient or their survivors.
Copyright 2018 Rocket Lawyer Incorporated. Rocket Lawyer provides information and software only. Rocket Lawyer is not a "lawyer referral service" and does not provide legal advice or participate in any legal representation. Rocket Lawyer is not a law firm or a substitute for an attorney or law firm. Use of Rocket Lawyer is subject to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

In 2013, BMJ Open performed a study in which they found that "failure to diagnose" accounted for the largest portion of medical malpractice claims brought against health professionals. Furthermore, the study found that the most common result of this negligence was death of the patient.[9] The other most common categories of malpractice include negligent treatment and failure to warn.
As for your attempt to on the one hand to frame doctors as greedy drug dealers responsible for for most of this countries drug abuse, while at the same time trying to shame them into believing that theirs is a selfless avocation, some kind of priesthood where anyone not willing to martyr themselves to an ungrateful public, shouldn’t be able to practice. -Well i think you’d better put down whatever pills you’ve been swallowing, and come back to reality. Medicine is a profession, and its filled with human beings, not saints or demons. Human beings who will choose their own well being over that of a potential enemy every time just as YOU would. And greedy lawyers, unscrupulous patients, and unwitting juries all over this country are increasingly causing doctors to view their patients as potential enemies.
A 1996 study by Daniel P. Kessler and Mark McClellan analyzing data on elderly Medicare beneficiaries treated for two serious cardiac diseases in 1984, 1987, and 1990 determined that "malpractice reforms that directly reduce provider liability pressure lead to reductions of 5 to 9 percent in medical expenditures without substantial effects on mortality or medical complications."[50]
After meeting the notice requirements and other prerequisites, depending upon the jurisdiction an injured patient may be able to file a lawsuit against the doctor. In order to prove the doctor negligent and that he or she committed malpractice, the accident victim must first be able to show that the doctor breached the duty of care owed to the patient.
Doctors typically require patients to sign a consent form detailing the risks of any given treatment or procedure. But signing a form alone does not necessarily prove that the patient gave informed consent. The doctor must actually discuss the procedure and risks with the patient. And the patient must understand, to the extent possible, the risks he or she faces.
The medical industry uniquely benefits from broad autonomy and self-regulation. Standardization of care and general oversight work to balance physician autonomy, and some may say they even erode that autonomy to an extent. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) enforce patterns of practice to which providers must adhere. Emerging technologies throughout the 20th century paved the way for new treatment methods, but they also “raised patient expectations [while] multiplying the possibilities for mishaps.” In an examination of the interplay of autonomy and oversight, the Drexel Law Review wrote "Standardization and oversight serve to further reinforce patient expectations. By way of contrast, a disorganized profession typified by idiosyncratic practices discourages perceptions of consistent quality. Formal organization of the medical profession was intended, in part, to counter this characterization.”
I tried to make an appointment with my GP only to be told I couldn’t get in to to see one for five weeks I couldn’t help but laugh. She said if it’s an emergency the doctor could ring me back so i explained to the receptionists my problem and she classed it an emergency appointment . So I waited all day with my phone next to me only to have a phone call from the receptionists to say the doctor had been called out on an emergency and would call me back in the morning. So all day I waited yet again for a phone call from the doctor, eventually the next day I received a missed call at 6.50 in the evening with a message from my GP apologising for the delay , and could I ring the following morning to see if I can get in because it’s clear I need to see a doctor. I do understand doctors are really busy but to me this is ridiculous . So I have now decided to. Change to a different doctors surgery which is a real shame because I’ve been at this surgery for 25 years.
Any of these areas of conduct could classify as negligent practice, and if it can be shown these actions caused identifiable loss, damage, pain, or injury to you, there may well be a case to report a negligent Doctor to the British Medical Association (BMA). You should also check whether the hospital has a Patient Liaison and advisory service (PALS). If they do, you can complain directly to them, and they will investigate your complaint and provide a decision whether your complaint is justified. PALS will not, however, provide legal advice whether the actions or omissions of the Doctor were negligent.
No matter the value of your estate, it is essential that you plan for what will happen to your assets after your death. A living trust, when done correctly, can assure a faster distribution of your assets, avoid unnecessary taxes and keep your wishes private as well. But, it must be done right. Here are five things you must do before writing a living trust.

If a doctor fixes a serious medical problem that she finds while in the middle of another procedure, the patient probably does not have a claim for lack of informed consent. For example, if a patient consents to an operation in which the doctor will fix a heart valve, and in the midst of the operation the doctor finds another serious medical problem with the patient's heart, the doctor can go ahead and fix the second problem without getting separate informed consent from the patient.
I think the pressures and workloads on some local surgeries are becoming intolerable owing to a variety of factors. Anecdotal evidence seems to suggest that this explains the significant rise in patients and minor casualties presenting at A&E. In Norfolk, private medical care in independent hospitals, via day procedures and a standard menu of mainly orthopaedic treatments, appears to be booming and that trend must be attracting qualified personnel away from NHS service [although some of them also act as NHS consultants for part of their actual patient contact time].
According to Joseph’s Incorporated, proof of negligence is decided on the basis of a balance of probabilities. If you want to pursue a case, the onus is on you to prove negligence, as well as damage due to the negligence (see “Burden of proof”, below). Medical experts have to provide relevant, credible, reliable information, as it is certain that opposing lawyers will look for any opportunity to discredit them.
To add indirectly to Jeremy,s post a “startling ” piece of news has reached me from the Home of far-right Capitalism in relation to health care .AS you know the biggest debt in the US is health care not a mortgage many people taking their whole lives to pay off the medical charges “Obamacare ” was introduced but highly criticised by insurance companies and BB who were in the medical business . But hold on the great State of Colorado could become the first US State to replace it with —hold on —- an equivalent of the UK NHS — dont all jump up with indignation shouting –never ! we wont let it its “un- American ” they actually want to impose a tax hike on Colorado residents to pay for it –$38 billion of 10 % on the payroll tax –notice in this country cameron is using that as an excuse to Privatise the NHS . It would mean all residents would have EQUAL care – no gold-silver or bronze care and they could chose any doctor and specialist whether in or out of the network and deductibles would also be elimated . US BB medical are spitting fire as is Insurance groups ,do I need to say why ? well yes some might still think the US is run in a philanthropic manner —Profit -money $Billions – it will be interesting to see how far it gets and whether the Colorado residents vote it in ,there again they voted in Bernie Sanders so there is a chance . I look forward to watching massive funds being pumped into media advertising telling the people how its too dear when US medical costs are enormous even priced down to napkins and face masks etc etc.
It might have something to do with the government plans for GP,s to work -8am -8pm -SEVEN days a week –AND – consult with patients on Skype and email. But that just one of the issues GP DR Sarah says in her blog – which to me sounds fair comment– patient.info/blogs/sarah-says/2014/04/gp-extended-hours-great-in-theory-but/ To me this is just a devious government action to justify full privatisation of the NHS . A step at a time–public anger– bad GP,s -government- we can help — then the next “problem ” initiated by the government till – the SUN newspaper – GP,s “damaging” patients health and – look how “good ” the American system is (full privatisation ) we should get it here , and all the Lemmings jump off the cliff in agreement. I should add the rich Lemmings survive, pity about the poor.
So, the lawyer sues the doctor. The doctor being sued has malpractice insurance (most states won’t allow you to practice without it). So the insurance company pays for a lawyer to defend the doctor, as well as an expert witness to evaluate the case and attest that there was no malpractice. Notice that the patient’s lawyer still hasn’t spent any money. The doctor’s insurance company has spent a lot of money on expert witnesses and lawyers.

This Health Policy Report describes the malpractice system in the United States, examines its shortcomings, and analyzes the forces that have led to past and current malpractice crises. The authors review options for reform of the U.S. malpractice system. Conventional tort reforms include caps on damages, limits on attorneys' fees, and shortening of the statute of limitations. Experts have also proposed major system reforms, such as enterprise liability or administrative compensation.
Any of these areas of conduct could classify as negligent practice, and if it can be shown these actions caused identifiable loss, damage, pain, or injury to you, there may well be a case to report a negligent Doctor to the British Medical Association (BMA). You should also check whether the hospital has a Patient Liaison and advisory service (PALS). If they do, you can complain directly to them, and they will investigate your complaint and provide a decision whether your complaint is justified. PALS will not, however, provide legal advice whether the actions or omissions of the Doctor were negligent.
DISCLAIMER: Answers from Experts on JustAnswer are not substitutes for the advice of an attorney. JustAnswer is a public forum and questions and responses are not private or confidential or protected by the attorney-client privilege. The Expert above is not your attorney, and the response above is not legal advice. You should not read this response to propose specific action or address specific circumstances, but only to give you a sense of general principles of law that might affect the situation you describe. Application of these general principles to particular circumstances must be done by a lawyer who has spoken with you in confidence, learned all relevant information, and explored various options. Before acting on these general principles, you should hire a lawyer licensed to practice law in the jurisdiction to which your question pertains. The responses above are from individual Experts, not JustAnswer. The site and services are provided “as is”. To view the verified credential of an Expert, click on the “Verified” symbol in the Expert’s profile. This site is not for emergency questions which should be directed immediately by telephone or in-person to qualified professionals. Please carefully read the Terms of Service (last updated February 8, 2012).Show More
Despite that fact that the Constitution promises you the right to health care, no one has successfully sued the State for the non-delivery or lack of health care. Several test cases have concluded that, despite the Constitution and the Patients’ Rights Charter, the government has no absolute obligation to provide access to health care. Instead, the government is required to “progressively realise its obligations” to its citizens. In practical terms, this means, for example, that a patient who needs dialysis and cannot be treated because of a lack of facilities cannot sue the State.

The reason for negligence’s late recognition is because common law traditionally recognized only intentional torts; that is, it held parties responsible for injuries that were the result of intentional acts. It was irrelevant that the actor did not intend to injure anyone, much less the injured party, but it only needed to be shown that the actor intended the action that caused the injury. In these cases, evidence of who caused what injury was affirmative, direct, and fairly objective.


^ William M. Sage, M.D., Margaret Thompson, Cynthia Gorman, Melissa King. [ The Jury's Still Out: A Critical Look at Malpractice Reform], Center for American Progress, June 12, 2008. From the study, "There is no nationwide crisis [...] Malpractice is wrongly blamed for rising health care costs in the United States...Experts have found little correlation between malpractice claim increases and malpractice premium increases. "
A study by Michelle M. Mello and others published in the journal Health Affairs in 2010 estimated that the total annual cost of the medical liability system, including "defensive medicine," was about 2.4 percent of total U.S. health care spending.[53] The authors noted that "this is less than some imaginative estimates put forward in the health reform debate, and it represents a small fraction of total health care spending," although it was not "trivial" in absolute terms.[53]
Doctors typically require patients to sign a consent form detailing the risks of any given treatment or procedure. But signing a form alone does not necessarily prove that the patient gave informed consent. The doctor must actually discuss the procedure and risks with the patient. And the patient must understand, to the extent possible, the risks he or she faces.
Patients can already sue doctors for prescribing medications if they can prove that writing the prescriptions violated the standard of care and that they have suffered damages as a result. But Tick wants to take the concept a step further. If the patient sues a doctor and wins, the patient should receive payment for rehabilitation, possible punitive damages, and attorney’s fees.
Ex.: New York has a two-and-a-half year statute of limitations for medical malpractice cases, set by New York Civil Practice Law and Rules section 214-a. Let’s say a surgeon in New York negligently leaves a foreign object in a patient during surgery. What if the patient discovers the object 3 years after the surgery? In this example, the patient still has time to sue because New York has adopted a 1 year discovery rule. This patient actually has 1 year after discovery of the object to file a lawsuit. (Note, however, that if there is proven evidence that the plaintiff missed the statute of limitations because the object should have been discovered earlier than it was, then the case could be dismissed.)

Medical malpractice court cases have been filed against specialists, and if your specialist caused you injury due to negligent care, you may be able to file a claim, too. Medical specialists are held to a higher standard than general practitioners because of their high skill level. Therefore, when a specialist breaches the acceptable standard of care and causes you harm, you can hold him or her accountable through a physician malpractice claim.
After a suit is filed, both parties gather information from the other. For example, the plaintiff’s attorney will request their client’s medical records from the defendant. There will then be interrogatory forms (a set of written questions to clarify facts) submitted by each attorney to the opposing party, and depositions (formal meetings in which an individual  –  such as the plaintiff, the defendant, or an expert for either party  –  is questioned under oath). A record of these depositions is taken for potential use in court. Usually, the people who attend the deposition include attorneys for both parties and the court reporter. In some cases, the plaintiff or defendant can also choose to attend to observe, but does not talk or ask questions. Sometimes, the defendant and their attorney will agree to settle the case prior to court  –  that is, the defendant pays the plaintiff a mutually agreed upon amount called a “settlement.”

You all have failed to see one major issue – I for instance am a professional who has been successful for years;however do to sports was prescribed pain meds, that accidentally led to addiction… No I would not be interested in suing the initial doctors for the initial treatments; however, it is the so called rehab outpatient programs some which are very prestigious as the one I used. That first consultation led to this drug, that drug, to full blown high doses to the point if I stop I cannot work would essentially be hospitalized for a minimum a month, so you think those Doctors or places shouldn’t be sued? It has also led to extreme depression among other issues and I have never once abused my medication in treatment like the losers you speak of who take Methadone or other substances and try to mix to still get those old effects. If you all didn’t have your head in the sand you may understand. Unbelievable comments.
The short answer to your question is: MAYBE. I know that sounds a bit squishy but I’ll explain. The reason the answer is “maybe” lies in the definition of medical malpractice — A doctor’s failure to comply with the prevailing standard of care in rendering (or failing to render) medical care and treatment to a patient which results in compensable harm.
For example, if your knee didn’t heal properly after surgery, but the doctor performed the surgery according to standards of care, he may not have committed medical malpractice. But if you developed shooting pain in your knee after surgery and a follow-up revealed a severed ligament, and the doctor didn’t tell you about it, that may be malpractice.

A 2011 study appearing in the Journal of the American College of Radiology revealed that the legal costs to doctors for failing to communicate diagnostic test results rose by $70 million from 1991 to 2010 across all specialties. The lead study author stated that communication failure can happen at any level. Three scenarios, however, were identified as the leading causes of communication problems:


Cancer survivor and seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong switched oncologists because he wasn't comfortable with the language the first doctor used to describe his treatment ("I'm going to hit you with chemo... kill you and then bring you back to life."), Gary M. Reisfield, MD, and George R. WilsonIII, MD,of the University of Florida Health Science Center wrote in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2004. Armstrong found another oncologist whose approach better suited him.
I thought my first encounter with my new psychiatrist was traumatic but after reading everyone's comments I don't feel like I was abused as badly as so many of you were. I am doing research because this doctor was so rude and unprofessional that I actually was traumatized when I left his office after our first session. After reading and doing some research I have found that unfortunately I can not sue him for medical malpractice but you can bet I am going to report him to every medical organization I can. I have already gone to the hospital and spoken to upper management and they have forced him to prescribe my medication in the correct quantity after he lied to me in session and told me he could only prescribe a 30 day quantity. How am I supposed to make it through the other 2 months before my next appointment with him if I only have a 30 day supply? Idiot. He was irritated with me because even though he had my chart (my regular doctor abruptly left her practice 8 days before my scheduled appointment with her) and I was shuffled to this clown and they sent all my records to him (or so they said). He kept asking ME which of the meds listed on my chart were my psych meds and got irritated when I told him I didn't know. That's when I started to get nervous. If he was a real doctor, how is it he couldn't pick out the psych meds from everything else on my list? He asked me why I was taking so many anti-depressants. I thought to myself--that's a stupid question-I am the patient, I didn't prescribe them so how would I be able to even begin to answer that question? He explained that giving anti-depressants to a bipolar was like giving them rocket fuel. Then he snickered and said that maybe I had pissed off my last doctor( I suppose as an explanation for why she was overmedicating me and according to his opinion after seeing me for all of 15 minutes that I was too manic) As he perused my chart he saw something he didn't like and he said, "Shit!" I thought ok, that wasn't very professional. As he proceeded to ask questions, when I answered them (or I should say tried to answer them) he would interrupt me when he felt he'd gotten the information he needed and he'd say, " ok, that's all I need to know". He cut me off mid-sentence repeatedly as if I was wasting his time and he wanted me to just shut up once he got what he wanted for his purposes. One of my conditions is bipolar and somehow the question of being highly sexual came up and he said, "Oh, so you were promiscuous." I have never had anyone use that kind of terminology to describe that particular symptom. I have read books, magazines, done on-line research about bipolar ever since my diagnosis and I have not encountered that wording to describe the condition. I was shocked to hear a doctor use that term. I felt like he had called me a whore. At least that's how I felt. He asked me about working with other doctors and I shared that I had one doctor who never shared or gave any feedback and he laughed and said, "Well, then you won't like me, because I don't give feedback either." I thought to myself, how is it funny that a psychiatrist doesn't give a patient any kind of feedback at all? How is he going to now how my meds are working or if they aren't, and how am I supposed to know the same thing if he never interacts with me?" The icing on the cake was when he abruptly stopped speaking in the middle of his instructions about my meds and said, "OK, time's up, our session is over." I was so surprised I really had no idea what to say. I sat there for a minute trying to collect myself and to see if he was serious and he just kept staring at me, so I said,"Um, well, if you think it's not important to give me instructions on my meds, then I guess I have to leave since you are telling me to go." I was floundering at this point because I honestly had no idea what I was going to do. They tell you to take your meds, take your meds, take your meds, because it is so important that you stay on your regime once your doctor gets you started, and so many people with bipolar stop once they feel better, but I knew how wild my life had been before I was finally diagnosed so I am totally dedicated to staying on medications and here was my doctor kicking me out of his office without my meds. I was totally freaked out. Then he said, "No, I'm going to finish giving you your instructions, but I wanted to make a point of it that you were late and that now you are cutting into my next patient's time. I had been on time but I did stop at the desk to write my co-pay which took all of maybe 2 or 3 minutes. He finished his instructions to me and as I was leaving he said, "Remember, if you want respect, you have to give respect." And then he instructed me to be early to my next visit. I suppose to be sure that I didn't spend 3 minutes writing out my co-pay. I was so freaked out, I felt like a criminal for almost three days because I believed I had been so bad. Thank goodness, I've had several good doctors over the years, and as I processed it more and more I started to get angry. Really, really angry. I won't even go into the run around I got from the sorry excuse they have for a patient liason who was absolutely no help. As a matter of fact, after dealing with her, I was even angrier. I was torn between pursuing the matter further or just letting it go because I knew I was going to run out of meds in 30 days and then what? But this week after seeing my talk therapist and being able to compare my reactions to hers, I realized that HE was the one who had been wildly inappropriate and that he had been unprofessional, rude, and actually, just downright mean. I have no idea why people like that are even allowed to practice medicine. Especially the kind of medicine where they can really mess someone up with medication and with inappropriate or cruel behavior. So I drove to the hospital, demanded to see anyone who was not that excuse for a patient liason, got a printed copy of my patient's rights (which I did not know existed had I not seen them posted on the wall at the front desk when I went in that day) They called and I got to speak to someone in risk management (so apparently the patient liason person lied to me when she said she did not report to anyone and refused to let me have the corporate address and said they only people above her were the doctors and they would not want to speak to me about my issue)
A medical malpractice case isn't the kind of legal action you want to try handling on your own. These cases can get very complex from a legal, medical, and procedural standpoint. Proving your case is going to require not just a firm understanding of the law as it applies to your situation, but a familiarity with the kinds of hoops a medical malpractice plaintiff needs to jump through, including the retention of the right expert medical witness.
P.S. Opioid tolerance and dependence are normal and expected physiological responses to continuous opioid therapy. Fixing a patient’s physical dependence on a opioid once there is no more need of it for pain relief is a simple matter of tapering down. Thousands of people who were lucky enough to survive cancer or other trauma do it every year, no dramas.

Every medical malpractice case is different and relies on a unique set of facts. However, there are scenarios that more commonly align with a medical malpractice case. For example, a nurse or medical technician may give a patient the wrong type of medication or dosage. Another reason for a medical malpractice case is if the hospital employee did not follow the treating physician’s instructions regarding the care of a patient.

In many jurisdictions, a medical malpractice lawsuit is initiated officially by the filing and service of a summons and complaint. The parties subsequently engage in discovery,"[2] a process through which documents such as medical records are exchanged, and depositions are taken by parties involved in the lawsuit. A deposition involves the taking of statements made under oath about the case. Certain conversations are not discoverable due to issues of privilege, a legal protection against discovery,[4] but most conversations between the parties and witnesses are discoverable.
on a regular basis. Prescribe toxic drugs to children, teens, adults and the elderly, drugs known to create psychosis, anxiety, akathisia, abnormal thoughts, suicidal and homicidal thoughts. Drugs causing diabetes, tardive akathisia, metabolic syndrome, heart attacks... And they prescribe them in cocktail poly drugging format. Some of the real lunatics in this fake area also brain damage their victims with ECT.
Figures released in September 2015 by the Democratic Alliance’s Gauteng shadow MEC for health and member of the provincial legislature, Jack Bloom, show that R540 million was paid out by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health as compensation for medical malpractice between 2010 and September 2015. This is money that would otherwise have been used to provide health services, Bloom says.

A large number of medical malpractice lawsuits stem from the misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of a medical condition, illness, or injury. When a doctor's diagnosis error leads to incorrect treatment, delayed treatment, or no treatment at all, a patient's condition can be made much worse, and they may even die. That being said, a mistake in diagnosis by itself is not enough to sustain a medical malpractice lawsuit.


Courts have also held that medical malpractice cases by active duty service members for their own injuries while not on leave are barred by Feres. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has held that a service-member that was injured in a Naval Hospital was barred by Feres for his own injuries because he was admitted to the hospital due to his status. Generally, courts will find that the Feres Doctrine will bar your suit if you are an active-duty service member suing for your own injuries arising out of medical malpractice.
For example, if a doctor prescribes a medication without first asking you about allergies, and you have a severe adverse reaction, this could be a case of negligence. But if you failed to mention one of your allergies when asked, or the doctor could have had no way of knowing that you could be allergic to the medicine prescribed, there was no negligence, and you would be unable to sue for malpractice.
A doctor might simply forget about a patient or the patient might become "lost in the system" due to a computer glitch. In some cases, doctors have argued that they should not be held liable for abandoning a patient because there was no intent to abandon. This argument has failed almost without exception because a doctor has a duty to continue treatment of a patient until the patient is properly released. The only difference between an intentional and an inadvertent abandonment case is that punitive damages might be available in a case where there is evidence of an intent to cause harm.
The 1960's and 1970's also saw the emergence of the doctrine of informed consent. Modern medicine requires that medical professionals disclose all of the associated risks that accompany a given procedure. This way, if a treatment or procedure entails serious or deterrent risk, the patient may make an informed personal decision to refuse it, such is their right. During these two decades, it became a fundamental tenant of biomedical ethics that a patient is informed of all the risks in a procedure. Failure to warn patients of possible adverse outcomes could become an additional source of liability for physicians and medical professionals. Legislatures eventually got down to the task of explicitly defining what information must be disclosed, and what constitute a "lack" of informed consent. The definition tiptoed around the issues of emergency care, patient-provider relationships, “common” knowledge, consent on behalf of a minor, and whether a given risk would deter a “reasonable” person from accepting treatment. Lawmakers set about drafting ironclad informed consent law that covered the ifs, ands and buts of most conceivable situations that required informed medical consent. In the same era, courts discarded the doctrine of charitable immunity which had previously immunized charitable institutions from suit.
The first medical malpractice cases in the United States centered around a breach of contract and not failure to adhere to a standard of care. This meant that the defendant physician made some sort of express promise to skillfully render care and obtain a good result. Failure to do so was grounds for a suit. Five years after George Washington's inauguration, the country saw its first recorded medical malpractice lawsuit. A man sued the surgeon who operated on his wife and caused her to die, despite having made promises to the two that he would operate skillfully and safely. This breach of contract case resulted in a plaintiff verdict and an award of 40 pounds.

Breaking up with your doctor is not a choice most people take lightly, but there may come a time when it's the single best decision for you and your health. Some patients have had complaints that have been mounting over the years. Others decide to fire their doctor after one heated episode - perhaps because of a missed diagnosis like Della Casa, a disagreeable interaction, or a health concern that was dismissed.


Differential diagnosis is a systemic method used by doctors to identify a disease or condition in a patient. Based upon a preliminary evaluation of the patient, the doctor makes a list of diagnoses in order of probability. The physician then tests the strength of each diagnosis by making further medical observations of the patient, asking detailed questions about symptoms and medical history, ordering tests, or referring the patient to specialists. Ideally, a number of potential diagnoses will be ruled out as the investigation progresses, and only one diagnosis will remain at the end. Of course, given the uncertain nature of medicine, this is not always the case.
An August 2003 National Bureau of Economic Research paper by Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra found that (1) "increases in malpractice payments made on behalf of physicians do not seem to be the driving force behind increases in premiums"; (2) "increases in malpractice costs (both premiums overall and the subcomponent factors) do not seem to affect the overall size of the physician workforce, although they may deter marginal entry, increase marginal exit, and reduce the rural physician workforce"; and (3) "there is little evidence of increased use of many treatments in response to malpractice liability at the state level, although there may be some increase in screening procedures such as mammography."[49]
Thanks, Ian. I thought such cases were isolated [there is a similar situation not far from us but there have been no references to other examples and I thought perhaps Quin’s report was related to that case]. Is there a common cause? Are practices becoming “incorporated” like schools are and doctors don’t want to work under those constraints? Perhaps the most recent changes to GP’s contracts have altered their attitude and commitment to community general practice. I agree, it is all rather disturbing.
GOOD LUCK getting THEM to write you a prescription for a highly addictive drug, betting none of their patients will abuse it and then try to destroy them, for their kindness. If you think surgery is expensive in this country, just wait until you see the price of pain management, in a society full of overgrown children who believe that every mistake they make is somebody elses’ fault. By siding with the abuser, juries have no idea how painful a mistake they are making for themselves. Chronic pain comes to almost all of us in time, but in the future, relief from it may only be found on the streets at 30 times the cost, and risking prison to get it.
One of the most common reasons that a physician may be accused of medical malpractice is due to the failure to diagnose. This is premised on the idea that the patient needlessly suffered for an extended period of time because the doctor failed to properly evaluate tests or run tests that should have reasonably notified him or her of the potential diagnosis. Other examples of medical malpractice include misdiagnosing a medical condition, failing to provide appropriate treatment, causing an unreasonable delay in treating a diagnosed condition, violating HIPAA laws, performing wrong-site surgery and performing surgery on the wrong patient.

To have a valid hospital negligence claim, it must be shown that the level of care provided to the victim fell below a reasonable standard. Additionally, a successful medical malpractice claim must prove causation. This means that the link between the substandard care and the victim’s injury or death must be clearly demonstrated. Due to the multifaceted and complex nature of medical malpractice claims, it is important to hire a lawyer with extensive experience and resources related to this area of law. A positive outcome often relies on the ability and knowledge of your legal team. At Hodes Milman, our lawyers have helped countless victims, and we can help you understand and assert your rights.

No matter the value of your estate, it is essential that you plan for what will happen to your assets after your death. A living trust, when done correctly, can assure a faster distribution of your assets, avoid unnecessary taxes and keep your wishes private as well. But, it must be done right. Here are five things you must do before writing a living trust.


The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. If we do not win, you will not be responsible for attorney's fees, court costs, or litigation expenses. If you do win, these expenses and unpaid medical bills will be taken from your share of the recovery.
Doctor Mistake, Injury is Minor – This category encompasses situations in which a doctor misdiagnoses an injury (perhaps an ankle sprain) and then quickly corrects the misdiagnosis.  Like the no-injury scenario described above, the patient would not have a case for medical malpractice against the doctor.  Because the doctor quickly corrected the mistake, the patient suffered no damage.
The second main component of your case will be the establishment of medical malpractice  damages. To sue the doctor, it’s not enough that he or she failed to treat or diagnose a disease or injury in time; it must also have caused additional injury. That means showing exactly how -- and to what extent -- the delay in the provision of medical care harmed you. This will also usually require the testimony of an expert medical witness.
According to a study by the Department of Health and Human Service's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that one in ten patients that die within 90 days of a surgery are killed because of a preventable error. When medical malpractice occurs, not only are patients' lives adversely affected, so are their pocket books. According to the Department of Health and Human Service's study:

Andrew W. Norfleet, Esquire Helping disabled individuals throughout Pennsylvania. awn@norlaflaw.com www.norlaflaw.com DISCLAIMER: This post is intended as general information applicable only to the state of Pennsylvania and is personal in nature, not professional in nature. The information given is based strictly upon the facts provided. This post is not intended to create an attorney client relationship, or to provide any specific guarantee of confidentiality

Our attorneys treat clients like we would our own family. We understand how important it is to have a compassionate bedside manner.We take the time to listen to you, answer your questions and ensure you understand what to expect in your medical malpractice claim. Just as we would for a family member, we commit to having a partner in our firm oversee each case, rather than handing off claims to a “case manager.” Our attorneys are always available to personally speak with you about the progress on your case.


There are limitation periods within which to sue NHS hospitals or bring a medical negligence claim for compensation against a doctor or other medical professional. The general rule is that you must bring a claim against the NHS or hospital within three years of the negligence. Alternatively, time runs from the date when you knew (or should have known) that the injury from which you suffered might give rise to a legal claim for compensation. By its very nature, the second alternative is always open to question by defendants. It is therefore always safest to bring a claim within three years of the negligence occurring where this is possible.
Bring a recorder in next time. Honestly, it's something I will do if I ever speak with a Doctor again .I've known one that completely lied on my notes and I was shocked. If I didn't agree with him he replied don't forget "I have your notes" this Doctor abused his power and I was emotionally broken. Doctors and therapist that abuse need OUT of the health fields and please remember they are not always right..My heart goes out to anyone who has ever been taken advantage of or harmed by any Doctor or therapist. They have rules that by law they must follow.
How can you tell the difference between appropriate, but unsuccessful care and medical malpractice? Ask. Ask your doctor. Get second opinions if possible. Talk to lawyers, who may have medically trained staff that can give an informed opinion, or who may have dealt with the exact same issue (or doctor) you are dealing with. Do whatever you can to attempt to allay any misgivings you have about your care. But take any opinions with a grain of salt. Some doctors simply won’t accuse a “brother physician” of making a mistake. Some malpractice attorneys will exaggerate the potential of your claim in an attempt to make money. Use your best discretion when seeking opinions on your treatment, but be diligent in the pursuit of information. Until you file a lawsuit, you are your own best advocate and investigator.
Unfortunately worker compensation doctor are not your personal doctors and it is not their job to help you. They only serve the role to provide medical information and determinated for review by the board. If you're not pleased with your current attorney I suggest you tell him and if that does not resolve the problem then you should retain a new attorney
Losing a loved one is never easy, especially when the loss could have been avoided. Often in cases of medical malpractice, those who are left behind after a loved one's passing wonder why the doctor is not going to jail for murder. Is it possible for one to charge a doctor with murder when their treatment of a patient was so poor as to result in death?

Somewhere between 210,000 and 400,000 Americans die each year due to a medical error (James 2013); it is now the third leading cause of death in the United States (Makary 2016). Many more sustain injuries that leave them with lifelong disabilities. Moreover, a recent national survey revealed that 21% of Americans have personally experienced a medical error, and 31% have been involved in the care of a family member or friend who did. As discussed above, tort reform measures may be effective in limiting the number and success of malpractice lawsuits, but don’t necessarily address the underlying issue of the malpractice epidemic in America.

We consider all cases on a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA), also known as a No Win No Fee agreement. This means that if you are not successful in pursuing your claim, we will not charge you any of our base legal costs. If we are successful with your claim, we submit the costs which we have incurred in pursuing the claim to the defendant/s and or their insurers. We are also entitled to charge a success fee, which will be deducted from your recoverable damages at the end of the claim. However, we can offer a competitive success fee and our aim will always to beat a success fee offer by any other firm. This means that we aim to beat the terms offered by other law firms and you will receive more of your compensation.

I just don’t understand it here in UK, why is it so bad? I’m from Australia living in London and when i first registered for a doctor i was told i would have to wait 2 – 3 weeks. So you have to know in advance if you’re going to be sick? I had been terribly i’ll for 3 days , fever, vomiting, diarrhea etc, so i decided to go to a walk in clinic instead where after waiting 5 hours i was told that i didn’t really need to see a doctor and i would only be seeing a nurse. Upon explaining my symptoms the nurse she asked me if i had eaten out in the last 3 days, after i replied that i hadn’t eaten out at all, she just out of no where looked me straight in the face and said exactly this “Why are you trying to deny it could be something you have eaten?”. I was literally just speechless. Anyway a long story short, she prescribed me water. I then went across the road to the chemist and asked if they had anything to settle my stomach and diarrhea and she just looked at me and said you need to see a doctor, i literally just laughed.
Prominent physicians Nathan Smith and R.E. Griffith of Yale and the University of Pennsylvania respectively held the belief that medical malpractice lawsuits were beneficial and necessary, serving as a tool of accountability in a profession that was poorly regulated. The American Medical Association (AMA) was founded in 1847 with the goal of promoting standardization of the profession, as well as elevating the standing of physicians in society. At the time, the vast majority of suits stemmed from orthopedic malpractice and deformations that resulted from botched amputations. As physicians sought to raise their own standards, higher patient expectations ensued. With the arrival of liability insurance for physicians, medical malpractice suits shot up in the States in the late 19th century.
What about this situation? I went searching for a doctor 5 years ago as an alternative to the methadone clinic. I had been a heroin addict. Once I found my doctor, I explained to him that is like to stay on methadone as it worked for me, but I did not want to go to a clinic every day as it was not convenient. I was making decent money at the time and could afford to pay his fees. His solution? Break California law (at my disease of addiction-addled mind’s request) and write me a script for methadone, and said “I’ll just write in that you have back pain.” Keep in kind this was a suboxone Dr. He went on to prescribe 40mg methadone daily, 30mg of diazepam daily, 60mg of adderall daily, 20mg of Celexa, then on top of that my own home injections of testosterone cypionate.
More and more people in South Africa are taking their doctors and other healthcare professionals to court for medical malpractice – so much so that the increase in litigation is contributing to our high medical inflation. But you can’t take such action lightly: the legal process is fraught with pitfalls and can be very drawn out, and the costs can be high. You need to be sure of your case, and of all the hoops you’ll have to jump through, before pursuing a claim.
I thought my first encounter with my new psychiatrist was traumatic but after reading everyone's comments I don't feel like I was abused as badly as so many of you were. I am doing research because this doctor was so rude and unprofessional that I actually was traumatized when I left his office after our first session. After reading and doing some research I have found that unfortunately I can not sue him for medical malpractice but you can bet I am going to report him to every medical organization I can. I have already gone to the hospital and spoken to upper management and they have forced him to prescribe my medication in the correct quantity after he lied to me in session and told me he could only prescribe a 30 day quantity. How am I supposed to make it through the other 2 months before my next appointment with him if I only have a 30 day supply? Idiot. He was irritated with me because even though he had my chart (my regular doctor abruptly left her practice 8 days before my scheduled appointment with her) and I was shuffled to this clown and they sent all my records to him (or so they said). He kept asking ME which of the meds listed on my chart were my psych meds and got irritated when I told him I didn't know. That's when I started to get nervous. If he was a real doctor, how is it he couldn't pick out the psych meds from everything else on my list? He asked me why I was taking so many anti-depressants. I thought to myself--that's a stupid question-I am the patient, I didn't prescribe them so how would I be able to even begin to answer that question? He explained that giving anti-depressants to a bipolar was like giving them rocket fuel. Then he snickered and said that maybe I had pissed off my last doctor( I suppose as an explanation for why she was overmedicating me and according to his opinion after seeing me for all of 15 minutes that I was too manic) As he perused my chart he saw something he didn't like and he said, "Shit!" I thought ok, that wasn't very professional. As he proceeded to ask questions, when I answered them (or I should say tried to answer them) he would interrupt me when he felt he'd gotten the information he needed and he'd say, " ok, that's all I need to know". He cut me off mid-sentence repeatedly as if I was wasting his time and he wanted me to just shut up once he got what he wanted for his purposes. One of my conditions is bipolar and somehow the question of being highly sexual came up and he said, "Oh, so you were promiscuous." I have never had anyone use that kind of terminology to describe that particular symptom. I have read books, magazines, done on-line research about bipolar ever since my diagnosis and I have not encountered that wording to describe the condition. I was shocked to hear a doctor use that term. I felt like he had called me a whore. At least that's how I felt. He asked me about working with other doctors and I shared that I had one doctor who never shared or gave any feedback and he laughed and said, "Well, then you won't like me, because I don't give feedback either." I thought to myself, how is it funny that a psychiatrist doesn't give a patient any kind of feedback at all? How is he going to now how my meds are working or if they aren't, and how am I supposed to know the same thing if he never interacts with me?" The icing on the cake was when he abruptly stopped speaking in the middle of his instructions about my meds and said, "OK, time's up, our session is over." I was so surprised I really had no idea what to say. I sat there for a minute trying to collect myself and to see if he was serious and he just kept staring at me, so I said,"Um, well, if you think it's not important to give me instructions on my meds, then I guess I have to leave since you are telling me to go." I was floundering at this point because I honestly had no idea what I was going to do. They tell you to take your meds, take your meds, take your meds, because it is so important that you stay on your regime once your doctor gets you started, and so many people with bipolar stop once they feel better, but I knew how wild my life had been before I was finally diagnosed so I am totally dedicated to staying on medications and here was my doctor kicking me out of his office without my meds. I was totally freaked out. Then he said, "No, I'm going to finish giving you your instructions, but I wanted to make a point of it that you were late and that now you are cutting into my next patient's time. I had been on time but I did stop at the desk to write my co-pay which took all of maybe 2 or 3 minutes. He finished his instructions to me and as I was leaving he said, "Remember, if you want respect, you have to give respect." And then he instructed me to be early to my next visit. I suppose to be sure that I didn't spend 3 minutes writing out my co-pay. I was so freaked out, I felt like a criminal for almost three days because I believed I had been so bad. Thank goodness, I've had several good doctors over the years, and as I processed it more and more I started to get angry. Really, really angry. I won't even go into the run around I got from the sorry excuse they have for a patient liason who was absolutely no help. As a matter of fact, after dealing with her, I was even angrier. I was torn between pursuing the matter further or just letting it go because I knew I was going to run out of meds in 30 days and then what? But this week after seeing my talk therapist and being able to compare my reactions to hers, I realized that HE was the one who had been wildly inappropriate and that he had been unprofessional, rude, and actually, just downright mean. I have no idea why people like that are even allowed to practice medicine. Especially the kind of medicine where they can really mess someone up with medication and with inappropriate or cruel behavior. So I drove to the hospital, demanded to see anyone who was not that excuse for a patient liason, got a printed copy of my patient's rights (which I did not know existed had I not seen them posted on the wall at the front desk when I went in that day) They called and I got to speak to someone in risk management (so apparently the patient liason person lied to me when she said she did not report to anyone and refused to let me have the corporate address and said they only people above her were the doctors and they would not want to speak to me about my issue)
In Australia you don’t have to register with a doctor, you can just ring any clinic and make an appointment, only sometimes if you’re ringing after midday you might not be able to get an appointment on the same day, and if you can’t you can just go to a walk-in clinic and be seen by a doctor within an hour, a doctor! not a damn nurse! Not to mention most doctors surgeries are open saturday and sundays too, here seems they are all closed on the weekend.
The first step is a letter of demand, a letter sent by your lawyer to the doctor or health facility concerned, setting out your claim and the period in which the accused should meet it. Thereafter, getting a case to court can take up to four years. Accurate case data and hospital notes have to be gathered; records relating to the patient’s prior medical history, treatment at the hands of the suspected transgressor, and any subsequent treatment must be obtained. Then, lay witnesses must be found, expert witnesses briefed and court dates agreed on. In addition, both the patient’s medical condition and prevailing medical treatments have to be researched.

When you go to a hospital, you expect that the medical care you receive will make you better. But with multiple health care professionals in hospitals involved in your treatment, the risk of medical error increases. Sometimes, inadequate patient safety procedures cause hospitals to commit serious medical errors and patients are seriously or fatally injured. Our hospital malpractice attorneys are here for you.
Medical malpractice occurs when patients are harmed by the actions (or inaction) of doctors and other healthcare professionals. Common types of cases in this area of law include childbirth injuries, medical misdiagnosis, surgery errors, and hospital related infections. Learn about common types of medical malpractice and legal issues like informed consent, medical negligence, and damage caps in medical malpractice cases.
A physician that delivers substandard care subjects him or herself to a formal compliant. Misdiagnosis, careless treatment that causes you harm, or an unusual delay in treatment are complaint-worthy medical errors. Prescribing issues, such as under- or overprescribing medication or giving you the wrong medication, are also grounds for a formal complaint. Working under the influence of drugs or alcohol; sexual misconduct; practicing without a license; and altering records are a few other examples of proper types of complaints.
(function(){"use strict";function s(e){return"function"==typeof e||"object"==typeof e&&null!==e}function a(e){return"function"==typeof e}function u(e){X=e}function l(e){G=e}function c(){return function(){r.nextTick(p)}}function f(){var e=0,n=new ne(p),t=document.createTextNode("");return n.observe(t,{characterData:!0}),function(){t.data=e=++e%2}}function d(){var e=new MessageChannel;return e.port1.onmessage=p,function(){e.port2.postMessage(0)}}function h(){return function(){setTimeout(p,1)}}function p(){for(var e=0;et.length)&&(n=t.length),n-=e.length;var r=t.indexOf(e,n);return-1!==r&&r===n}),String.prototype.startsWith||(String.prototype.startsWith=function(e,n){return n=n||0,this.substr(n,e.length)===e}),String.prototype.trim||(String.prototype.trim=function(){return this.replace(/^[\s\uFEFF\xA0]+|[\s\uFEFF\xA0]+$/g,"")}),String.prototype.includes||(String.prototype.includes=function(e,n){"use strict";return"number"!=typeof n&&(n=0),!(n+e.length>this.length)&&-1!==this.indexOf(e,n)})},"./shared/require-global.js":function(e,n,t){e.exports=t("./shared/require-shim.js")},"./shared/require-shim.js":function(e,n,t){var r=t("./shared/errors.js"),i=(this.window,!1),o=null,s=null,a=new Promise(function(e,n){o=e,s=n}),u=function(e){if(!u.hasModule(e)){var n=new Error('Cannot find module "'+e+'"');throw n.code="MODULE_NOT_FOUND",n}return t("./"+e+".js")};u.loadChunk=function(e){return a.then(function(){return"main"==e?t.e("main").then(function(e){t("./main.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"dev"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("dev")]).then(function(e){t("./shared/dev.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"internal"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("internal"),t.e("qtext2"),t.e("dev")]).then(function(e){t("./internal.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"ads_manager"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("ads_manager")]).then(function(e){undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined,undefined}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"publisher_dashboard"==e?t.e("publisher_dashboard").then(function(e){undefined,undefined}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):"content_widgets"==e?Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("content_widgets")]).then(function(e){t("./content_widgets.iframe.js")}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe):void 0})},u.whenReady=function(e,n){Promise.all(window.webpackChunks.map(function(e){return u.loadChunk(e)})).then(function(){n()})},u.installPageProperties=function(e,n){window.Q.settings=e,window.Q.gating=n,i=!0,o()},u.assertPagePropertiesInstalled=function(){i||(s(),r.logJsError("installPageProperties","The install page properties promise was rejected in require-shim."))},u.prefetchAll=function(){t("./settings.js");Promise.all([t.e("main"),t.e("qtext2")]).then(function(){}.bind(null,t))["catch"](t.oe)},u.hasModule=function(e){return!!window.NODE_JS||t.m.hasOwnProperty("./"+e+".js")},u.execAll=function(){var e=Object.keys(t.m);try{for(var n=0;n=c?n():document.fonts.load(l(o,'"'+o.family+'"'),a).then(function(n){1<=n.length?e():setTimeout(t,25)},function(){n()})}t()});var w=new Promise(function(e,n){u=setTimeout(n,c)});Promise.race([w,m]).then(function(){clearTimeout(u),e(o)},function(){n(o)})}else t(function(){function t(){var n;(n=-1!=y&&-1!=g||-1!=y&&-1!=v||-1!=g&&-1!=v)&&((n=y!=g&&y!=v&&g!=v)||(null===f&&(n=/AppleWebKit\/([0-9]+)(?:\.([0-9]+))/.exec(window.navigator.userAgent),f=!!n&&(536>parseInt(n[1],10)||536===parseInt(n[1],10)&&11>=parseInt(n[2],10))),n=f&&(y==b&&g==b&&v==b||y==x&&g==x&&v==x||y==j&&g==j&&v==j)),n=!n),n&&(null!==_.parentNode&&_.parentNode.removeChild(_),clearTimeout(u),e(o))}function d(){if((new Date).getTime()-h>=c)null!==_.parentNode&&_.parentNode.removeChild(_),n(o);else{var e=document.hidden;!0!==e&&void 0!==e||(y=p.a.offsetWidth,g=m.a.offsetWidth,v=w.a.offsetWidth,t()),u=setTimeout(d,50)}}var p=new r(a),m=new r(a),w=new r(a),y=-1,g=-1,v=-1,b=-1,x=-1,j=-1,_=document.createElement("div");_.dir="ltr",i(p,l(o,"sans-serif")),i(m,l(o,"serif")),i(w,l(o,"monospace")),_.appendChild(p.a),_.appendChild(m.a),_.appendChild(w.a),document.body.appendChild(_),b=p.a.offsetWidth,x=m.a.offsetWidth,j=w.a.offsetWidth,d(),s(p,function(e){y=e,t()}),i(p,l(o,'"'+o.family+'",sans-serif')),s(m,function(e){g=e,t()}),i(m,l(o,'"'+o.family+'",serif')),s(w,function(e){v=e,t()}),i(w,l(o,'"'+o.family+'",monospace'))})})},void 0!==e?e.exports=a:(window.FontFaceObserver=a,window.FontFaceObserver.prototype.load=a.prototype.load)}()},"./third_party/tracekit.js":function(e,n){/**
In most cases, doctors are not considered the direct employee of the hospital, but rather independent contractors. However, in some situations, doctors are employees. Doctors are more likely to be found to be employees of the hospital if the hospital controls the doctor’s working hours, vacation time and the fee schedule for the doctor’s services. In a few exceptions, a hospital may be found to be liable for a non-employee doctor’s services.
×