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Medical Malpractice Insurance | Medical Malpractice Articles 2018

pauline- the official line and the one I was forced to travel as part of NHS diversification is that you MUST visit an optician ,not necessarily the one you have been attending . Get an eye test and if they find anything wrong with your eyes that they as opticians cant sort they will recommend you to an NHS eye clinic . They will send you an appointment card to attend hospital and do tests on your eyes , this might take several visits but then they will advise the next NHS treatment . I should know I went through all that and still attend . So dont start with a GP appointment you will only be told to visit an optician ,once the optician sends in his report they MUST act -full stop !

The act of filing a complaint against a physician triggers a state medical board investigation of the physician for possible disciplinary action.  Realistically, there is only an extremely small chance that your complaint will result in disciplinary action against the physician.  Because state medical boards are composed of doctors, they likely feel a personal and professional kinship with the people they regulate and may be hesitant to discipline another member of their own profession.

If you file a complaint with the medical board and then file suit, know that the medical board can only take administrative action against the doctor’s license to practice medicine. It can’t help you pursue a medical malpractice case. It also can’t disclose any information that it collects during the course of its review with you or your family members.
In the United States, there are many jurisdictional issues that could bar bringing a claim in an American court. Litigants would have to establish that the doctor had sufficient contacts with the United States for it to exert jurisdiction over him or her. Even if the court does find that it can take jurisdiction over the case, it has to determine which nation and state’s laws would apply. 

Im going through this right now, a dr. Did a 45 min eval on me at the request of dfs just to make sure i was "ok" an this woman said i was borderline psychotic and narcissistic. . she made up lies on the report to support her claim.. And i cant get a 2nd opinion because dfs only excepts reports from workers in their department... I dont know what to do. These people are the devil.

If you qualify for compensation in the form of damages paid, you will most likely receive ‘Compensatory Damages’. These are based on your financial losses as a result of the malpractice including medical bills for extra treatment and earnings lost during your recovery period. Non-economic damages are intended as compensation for psychological, physical harm and distress.


For example, if a doctor prescribes a medication without first asking you about allergies, and you have a severe adverse reaction, this could be a case of negligence. But if you failed to mention one of your allergies when asked, or the doctor could have had no way of knowing that you could be allergic to the medicine prescribed, there was no negligence, and you would be unable to sue for malpractice.
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld
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Any of these areas of conduct could classify as negligent practice, and if it can be shown these actions caused identifiable loss, damage, pain, or injury to you, there may well be a case to report a negligent Doctor to the British Medical Association (BMA). You should also check whether the hospital has a Patient Liaison and advisory service (PALS). If they do, you can complain directly to them, and they will investigate your complaint and provide a decision whether your complaint is justified. PALS will not, however, provide legal advice whether the actions or omissions of the Doctor were negligent.
Many states limit the amount a plaintiff can recover in a medical malpractice lawsuit. For example, subjective damages like “pain and suffering” might be capped at $250,000. In a state with that kind of cap, you wouldn’t be able to recover more than $250,000 plus any medical expenses, lost wages and other “concrete” damages caused by the malpractice.
Medical malpractice suits are complex, and you will need the help of a specialized personal injury attorney. If you have reason to believe that you have been a victim of malpractice, and would like to investigate the possibility of bringing your ex-doctor to justice, get in touch with Herrman & Herrman’s experienced personal injury attorneys to discuss your case. We have brought unprofessional medical personnel to account for their carelessness in surgery, prescription of medication, incorrect or failed diagnosis, birth injuries and more.
The negligence resulted in significant damages - Legal malpractice lawsuits are expensive to litigate. For a case to be viable, the plaintiff must show significant damages that resulted from the negligence. If the damages are small, the cost of pursuing the case might be greater than the eventual recovery. To be worth pursuing, the plaintiff must show that the outcome resulted in losses far in excess of the amount of legal fees and expenses necessary to bring the action.
* Contingency fee model. An alternative to the fee-for-service model, where the injured party takes all the risk, is the contingency fee model. This option, provided for by the Contingency Fees Act of 1997, offers a mechanism for people with insufficient funds to access the courts if they have a good case. Under the terms and conditions of the agreement, lawyers provide their services on a “no win, no fee” basis. If the case is successful, the lawyers are entitled to double their fees to a maximum of 25 percent of the settlement, whichever is lower.
Ex.: New York has a two-and-a-half year statute of limitations for medical malpractice cases, set by New York Civil Practice Law and Rules section 214-a. Let’s say a surgeon in New York negligently leaves a foreign object in a patient during surgery. What if the patient discovers the object 3 years after the surgery? In this example, the patient still has time to sue because New York has adopted a 1 year discovery rule. This patient actually has 1 year after discovery of the object to file a lawsuit. (Note, however, that if there is proven evidence that the plaintiff missed the statute of limitations because the object should have been discovered earlier than it was, then the case could be dismissed.)

I think general practice should operate 08:00 – 20:00 every day including weekends and bank holidays. It does not automatically mean doctors, nurses and ancillary staff working longer hours overall. Nor does it mean that the same levels of staffing will be necessary throughout the opening hours and some weekday sessions might be reduced to allow for the additional weekend ones. Equally it should not require the full receptionist, pharmacist and other support services throughout the weekends. I don’t see any attempt at backdoor privatisation through this policy – doctors are already self-employed in any case. If patients want to have private medical treatment at their entire expense I don’t understand any objections to that and, to the extent that it takes some of the pressure off the NHS, it is probably a good thing on balance.
In the vast majority of cases, establishing the answer to this question requires testimony from an expert medical witness. The patient (usually through an attorney) consults a doctor who specializes in the relevant field, and the doctor offers an opinion as to the proper procedures to follow when deciding whether to terminate care in cases like the patient's -- and if the proper decision is to end care, the expert will also set out the appropriate way to go about ending the doctor-patient relationship under the circumstances.
Hospitals are usually not liable for the medical malpractice of doctors because most doctors are independent contractors. However, some doctors  are  employees of hospitals. Whether a doctor is an employee of the hospital depends on the nature of his or her relationship with the hospital. The following are a few of the general characteristics that might suggest the doctor is an employee:
When considering whether or not you can sue a doctor for negligence, you must ensure you bring suit within the deadline set by law, called the statute of limitations. All civil claims and lawsuits must be filed within a certain period of time. In the case of Florida doctor negligence, a patient ordinarily must bring a claim or lawsuit within two years after the patient discovers—or should have discovered—the injury. At the very latest, you must file the lawsuit within four years from the date when the alleged malpractice took place.
Cancer survivor and seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong switched oncologists because he wasn't comfortable with the language the first doctor used to describe his treatment ("I'm going to hit you with chemo... kill you and then bring you back to life."), Gary M. Reisfield, MD, and George R. WilsonIII, MD,of the University of Florida Health Science Center wrote in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2004. Armstrong found another oncologist whose approach better suited him.

Dr. Zaheer A. Shah, MD, JD (Attorney and Physician): The author of this answer is an Attorney-at-Law, licensed to practice law only in the state of Arizona and he is a board certified, Ivy League trained, practicing physician. Nothing posted on this forum by the author constitutes legal advice. Additionally, any medical opinions rendered on this forum in response to a particular question do not constitute medical advice. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of the author, and are neither privileged nor confidential. While an effort is made to offer accurate information, there is no guarantee as to accuracy.

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