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Medical Malpractice Failure To Refer | Medical Malpractice Elements

We physicians need to spend out time working with each other to limit abuse and overprescibing when we find it, and educate our patients as best we can regarding our need to limit and taper ceratin medications. While this is unpopular with many patients who are afraid, uneducated or in “pharmacuetical sales themselves”, it is necessary to protect not only them ,but the general public and ourselves. We need to inform legislators so they can make informed legislation, such as commonsense driving laws that do not arrest patients who are stable on mediction for simply driving to work.
Many states require patients to jump through a few hoops before filing medical malpractice lawsuits. These requirements vary by state. A patient might have to file an affidavit of merit in which a qualified medical expert attests that the plaintiff has a valid case. A patient also might have to submit a claim to a medical review board before filing in court, or agree to some form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).
Some medical malpractice claims arise from mistakes made in the operating room. A surgeon might be negligent during the operation itself (puncturing internal organs, operating on the wrong body part, or leaving surgical instruments in the body) or the nursing staff might be negligent in administering post-op care (which could result in complications like serious infection).
Our lawyers are focused on medical malpractice claims. We have extensive experience handling complicated claims involving medical errors, and our knowledgeable legal team is prepared to thoroughly investigate your case. We will need to show exactly what happened and identify every party that may be held responsible. Our team will gather all the evidence and consult with outside medical experts to show that there is a clear basis for your claim.
Although the laws of medical malpractice differ significantly between nations, as a broad general rule liability follows when a health care practitioner does not show a fair, reasonable and competent degree of skill when providing medical care to a patient.[2] If a practitioner holds himself out as a specialist a higher degree of skill is required.[2] Jurisdictions have also been increasingly receptive to claims based on informed consent, raised by patients who allege that they were not adequately informed of the risks of medical procedures before agreeing to treatment.[2]
The first element for your solicitor to prove if you are suing the NHS or a private doctor is that the medical professional or medical institution was negligent. Negligence is where the standard of medical care provided by the NHS or private hospital fell below the level expected of a professional in the field. For example, patients may be able to sue NHS hospitals because of failure to diagnose a medical condition, mistakes made in treatment such as surgery and use of improper or out of date treatment or medication.
Medical malpractice occurs when a patient is harmed by a doctor (or other medical professional) who fails to competently perform his or her medical duties. The rules about medical malpractice -- from when you must bring your lawsuit to whether you must notify the doctor ahead of time -- vary from state to state. But there are some general principals and broad categories of rules that apply to most medical malpractice cases. Here's an overview of the law and some of these special rules.
The "medical standard of care" is a legal concept that refers to the type and amount of care that a similarly-skilled and trained doctor would have provided under the circumstances. In abandonment cases, standard of care basically boils down to the question, "Would a reasonable doctor have terminated the doctor-patient relationship at the same point in treatment, and in the same way?"
The situation is different for patients injured in an emergency room. Usually, the hospital does not have an opportunity to inform emergency room patients that a doctor is not an employee. This means that ER patients can often sue the hospital for a doctor's medical malpractice. There are also a few states that say a hospital can be sued for emergency room malpractice regardless of what the patient believed or was told. (To learn more, read Nolo's article Medical Malpractice During Emergencies.)
DJ I understand where you are coming from, and I also understand those that dont agree with you. I have 3 bulging disc/ degenerative disc disease. Until the age of 30 I never touched an opiate or abused anything for that matter. My injury stemmed for a high school sports injury, but I dealt with the pain by eating right, exercising and took a Tylenol when needed. At the age of 30 the pain started getting much worse I because my job and the businesses I owned demanded me to work long hours and were physically demanding. So when I just couldnt take it any longer I went to the doctor who prescribed me percocets for about 3 or 4 months and then referred me to pain mgmt. I really liked the doctor, he was kind, compassionate, empathetic, smart and unrelated he was interested in me as a person, he actually visited a few of my businesses, we didn’t hang out or anything but I thought of him as a friend in a way but understood we weren’t. So now that you understand this I want to make it very clear I never tried to take advantage of that, not once did I ever ask for a certain medication. I just felt blessed that I had a doctor that actually cared for my well being and that I was not just a jane doe diagnosed and treated by the statistics. He started me off with oxy and injections. The injections were not working so long story short we tried a wide variety of meds, most either didn’t work for me or I had an adverse reaction to. Finally after a few years I was put on opana and oxy and it worked. The problem was his practice got busy and so did he. The result was he was still nice but he did all the talking and it was mostly like”its been a couple months on this dose your tolerance has increased so let’s up your dosage”, until I was at 30mg opana 2x day and 30mg oxy 3x day. Things were fine for awhile but the drugs start to change my temperament. My work started to suffer, my relationships also were becoming strained, because my whole life revolved around my medications, yes I was pain free but at what cost? So here lies the the million dollar question. Who’s fault is it? Mine for wanting to be pain free and trusting that my doctor giving more and more was in my best interest, yes in a way it is my fault for being nieve to the fact I was going to beable to pop these powerful drugs for the rest of my life. So the government decides to crack down and me on this insane amount of opiates and doc takes meds away, what a sick cruel joke on me. So now knowing what I know, my doctor put me on opana because of kickbacks and kept increasing dosage because of $ and I know this because a majority of his patients are in the same boat, they topped out and all is fine till the government cracked down and doc got scared, reduced or dropped patient and we all are so surprised why the US is now flooded with heroin addicts. So my opinion is the doctors that were prescribing ridiculously large amounts to fatten there pockets, even if they weren’t doing for the kickbacks, and used tolerance or whatever, we trusted that they would have been smart enough to see what was happening in this country and when the government once again passed legislation without thinking about the result of there actions, these doctors would have a game plan, but no they all held up there hands and want to blame it on anybody but themselves. Shame on you doctor’s that liked playing the game while you were winning but quit and ran home crying when the rules of the game changed, that is why I hold you doctors responsible, and I do feel bad for the good ones that get fucked in the process, but didn’t us patients with real pain get fucked by doctor shoppers? Stand up for yourselves, get oganized and counter sued the government for passing legislation(unrealistic restrictions without making sure these poor people have a realistic way to get off theses doses safely, at no cost. Isn’t funny how these pill pushing doctor’s do a 180 because the big money can’t be made by having their patients hooked on powerful opiates so they jump ship accusing them off being addicts dropping them and putting them on suboxane which is not a pain medication and wonder why they have no choice but to become heroin addicts. I blame the doctors for turning us into pill addicts but I blame the government for turning us into heroin addicts. In the end tne patient loses because whoever is at fault the patient will suffer
In many jurisdictions, a medical malpractice lawsuit is initiated officially by the filing and service of a summons and complaint. The parties subsequently engage in discovery,"[2] a process through which documents such as medical records are exchanged, and depositions are taken by parties involved in the lawsuit. A deposition involves the taking of statements made under oath about the case. Certain conversations are not discoverable due to issues of privilege, a legal protection against discovery,[4] but most conversations between the parties and witnesses are discoverable.

The 10th US Court of Appeals reviewed various similar informed consent cases and found that courts took different views on whether or not lying to a patient about a physician's background could be considered a breach of informed consent. Some courts held that doctors could be found liable only if they lied regarding the risks of the proposed treatment. In this case, the appellate court decided that the patient should have had a chance to make the argument, and sent the case back for retrial on that issue.
A malpractice claim exists if a provider's negligence causes injury or damages to a patient. However, experiencing a bad outcome isn't always proof of medical negligence. Also, on occasion, health-care providers will inform a patient that the person has received negligent medical care from a previous health-care provider and—presumably in an effort at complete honesty—will sometimes tell a patient that they, themselves, have made a mistake.

This was what is known as a Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) case.  The FTCA is a federal statute that allows private parties to sue the United States in Federal Court for torts committed by persons acting on behalf of the Government.  For example, if a doctor or nurse employed by a Veterans Administration hospital or a hospital on a military base commits malpractice, the patient would need to bring a medical malpractice claim under the FTCA.  Other examples of potential negligence claims against the Government include someone injured in an auto accident involving a Government owned vehicle, and someone injured due to a fall caused by negligent maintenance in a post office or other Government-owned facility.
The negligence caused a negative legal outcome - It is not sufficient that an attorney simply was negligent for a legal malpractice claim to be valid. The plaintiff must also prove that there were legal, monetary or other negative ramifications that were caused by the negligence. An unfavorable outcome by itself is not malpractice. There must be a direct causative link between a violation of the standard of professional conduct and the negative result.
I'm on my 4th Psychiatrist in the same practice over the past several years. I've been diagnosed with severe anxiety, manic depression, Bipolar and even ADHD. I also see a therapist in the same office who actually happens to be a Dr., 2 of the Psychiatrists were not actual MD's. they were associates. The therapist is the reason I keep going back though, he is helpful and doesn't always agree with the medications I've been prescribed. They even had me go through 6 1/2 weeks of TMS treatment, 45 minutes a day 5 days a week.
This website includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. All material on this site is not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice. Contact a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal issues or problems. Receipt of information from and use of this website to contact Gilman & Bedigian or one of its lawyers does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information until an attorney-client relationship has been established.

You may have a complaint about improper care (like claims of abuse to a nursing home resident) or unsafe conditions (like water damage or fire safety concerns). To file a complaint about improper care or unsafe conditions in a hospital, home health agency, hospice, or nursing home, contact your State Survey Agency. The State Survey Agency is usually part of your State’s department of health services.
There is only a limited time during which a medical malpractice lawsuit can be filed. In the United States, these time limits are set by statute. In civil law systems, similar provisions are usually part of the civil code or criminal code and are often known collectively as "periods of prescription" or "prescriptive periods." The length of the time period and when that period begins vary per jurisdiction and type of malpractice. Therefore, each state has different time limits set.[18] For example, in Pennsylvania, there is a two-year statute of limitation,[20] but in other states the limitations period may be longer. Most states have special provisions for minors that may potentially extend the statute of limitations for a minor who has been injured as the result of medical malpractice.[21]
The negligence caused a negative legal outcome - It is not sufficient that an attorney simply was negligent for a legal malpractice claim to be valid. The plaintiff must also prove that there were legal, monetary or other negative ramifications that were caused by the negligence. An unfavorable outcome by itself is not malpractice. There must be a direct causative link between a violation of the standard of professional conduct and the negative result.
The doctor was negligent. Just because you are unhappy with your treatment or results does not mean the doctor is liable for medical malpractice. The doctor must have been negligent in connection with your diagnosis or treatment. To sue for malpractice, you must be able to show that the doctor caused you harm in a way that a competent doctor, under the same circumstances, would not have. The doctor's care is not required to be the best possible, but simply "reasonably skillful and careful." Whether the doctor was reasonably skillful and careful is often at the heart of a medical malpractice claim. Almost all states require that the patient present a medical expert to discuss the appropriate medical standard of care and show how the defendant deviated from that standard.
After a suit is filed, both parties gather information from the other. For example, the plaintiff’s attorney will request their client’s medical records from the defendant. There will then be interrogatory forms (a set of written questions to clarify facts) submitted by each attorney to the opposing party, and depositions (formal meetings in which an individual  –  such as the plaintiff, the defendant, or an expert for either party  –  is questioned under oath). A record of these depositions is taken for potential use in court. Usually, the people who attend the deposition include attorneys for both parties and the court reporter. In some cases, the plaintiff or defendant can also choose to attend to observe, but does not talk or ask questions. Sometimes, the defendant and their attorney will agree to settle the case prior to court  –  that is, the defendant pays the plaintiff a mutually agreed upon amount called a “settlement.”
If you don’t file a medical malpractice claim or lawsuit against your doctor within the prescribed time period, absent some exceptional circumstances you will be barred from seeking monetary compensation for the injuries and damages you sustained. A medical malpractice lawyer should know the statute of limitations deadline in your jurisdiction and can work to make sure that a claim or lawsuit is filed in your case in a timely manner.
You must show that you had a physician-patient relationship with the doctor you are suing. Basically what this means is that you hired the doctor and the doctor agreed to be hired. So if you were harmed while following the advice of a doctor you overheard talking at a bar, you do not have a malpractice claim. If a doctor began seeing you and treating you, it is easy to prove a physician-patient relationship existed. Questions of whether or not the relationship exists most frequently arise where a consulting physician did not treat you directly.
My wife answered that question as you would have all doctors answer it, with a YES. Now that same patient who accused her of being cold, and having no empathy for their unbearable pain, is being SUED for everything she’s got because they couldn’t take responsibility for their own misuse of ADDICTIVE drugs. There is no such thing as chronic pain control WITHOUT potential dependance/addiction, and despite the constant pleas of ignorance in courtrooms all over this country, every adult in this society KNOWS THAT.
Doctor negligence claims can be complex as it can often be difficult to show that the injury or illness you are suffering from has been caused or exacerbated by the negligence of your GP. Your solicitor will arrange for you to be assessed by an independent medical expert who will assess your injuries and/or illness and will advise on whether the symptoms you are experiencing have been caused by the negligent actions (or inactions) of your GP.
The medical industry uniquely benefits from broad autonomy and self-regulation. Standardization of care and general oversight work to balance physician autonomy, and some may say they even erode that autonomy to an extent. Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) enforce patterns of practice to which providers must adhere. Emerging technologies throughout the 20th century paved the way for new treatment methods, but they also “raised patient expectations [while] multiplying the possibilities for mishaps.” In an examination of the interplay of autonomy and oversight, the Drexel Law Review wrote "Standardization and oversight serve to further reinforce patient expectations. By way of contrast, a disorganized profession typified by idiosyncratic practices discourages perceptions of consistent quality. Formal organization of the medical profession was intended, in part, to counter this characterization.”
When someone is victimized by medical malpractice at a municipal hospital in New York City, a medical malpractice claim must be handled somewhat differently from a claim against a private hospital. Municipal hospitals are governmental entities administered by city officials – the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) – so the procedures for legal disputes are slightly different.
Like all other tort cases, the plaintiff or their attorney files a lawsuit in a court with appropriate jurisdiction. However, unlike other tort cases, many states require that a plaintiff take specific steps before a medical malpractice lawsuit can be filed, such as providing the defendant with advance notice of intent to sue, obtaining and filing with the court a certificate of merit from a qualified medical expert who attests to the validity of the plaintiff's cause of action, submitting the claim to a panel of legal and medical experts for evaluation, or participating in mediation in an attempt to resolve the claim without litigation.[13]
Why is the statute of limitations deadline so important? If you try to file your claim after the deadline has passed, the health care provider you're trying to sue us sure to make a motion to dismiss the case, and the court is certain to grant it -- unless there's a reason to extend the deadline as it applies to your case, including the exceptions we've discussed in this article.
Incidentally, even when I was one week out of school if a patient asked when I graduated I told them the truth. Early on I did see an occasional look of fear at learning I was a newbie, but none of them asked for someone else. However, if they had asked for someone else that would have been their right and I would have respected their wishes. It's their money, their body, and their decision.
I think general practice should operate 08:00 – 20:00 every day including weekends and bank holidays. It does not automatically mean doctors, nurses and ancillary staff working longer hours overall. Nor does it mean that the same levels of staffing will be necessary throughout the opening hours and some weekday sessions might be reduced to allow for the additional weekend ones. Equally it should not require the full receptionist, pharmacist and other support services throughout the weekends. I don’t see any attempt at backdoor privatisation through this policy – doctors are already self-employed in any case. If patients want to have private medical treatment at their entire expense I don’t understand any objections to that and, to the extent that it takes some of the pressure off the NHS, it is probably a good thing on balance.
The exact answers to questions like this require more information than presented. The answer(s) provided should be considered general information. The information provided by this is general advice, and is not legal advice. Viewing this information is not intended to create, and does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. It is intended to educate the reader and a more definite answer should be based on a consultation with a lawyer. You should not take any action that might affect your claim without first seeking the professional opinion of an attorney. You should consult an attorney who can can ask all the appropriate questions and give legal advice based on the exact facts of your situation. The general information provided here does not create an attorney-client relationship.
So heres where everyone gets mad at me….. Yes, Im saying this is 90% my original DR.’s fault. Im on disability and not able to see ANY dr. i want – I tried to reason with her to NOT increase the dosage. Did i end up taking the patch and pills prescribed? YES. But i was also told by the prescribing DR. that addiction would NOT be an issue. Tolerance, yes.. but specifically NOT ADDICTION. Its in her clinic notes, and I have copies of all of them.
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The hospital may be found liable for negligence if it did not ensure that hospital staff had the required education, ongoing training or licensure. Additionally, it may be liable for not properly checking the backgrounds of other individuals who are not direct employees, such as surgeons or attending physicians, who administer care to patients. If a patient’s condition worsened because he or she had to wait longer because there was not adequate staff, the hospital may be found to be negligent.
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"Mental illness" is a term applied ubiquitously, without discretion. "History of mental illness," applies even if an individual is relatively not amongst the most vulnerable - may even maintain positions of power himself or herself, society criminalizes all things psychological. That individual would be forever marked, especially thanks to the Internet, even if they took a bank of other psychiatrists to a courtroom to testify on their behalf.
However, bringing a lawsuit is not for everyone. Weigh your options. If your fear of “looking bad” to family or friends outweighs your desire to bring a malpractice suit against your doctor for an injury he caused you or a loved one, bringing a suit may not be the best option for you. On the other hand, if your need or want to bring suit against your doctor outweighs your fear, taking action against your physician may be the right choice for you.
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