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Medical Malpractice Hernia Cases | Medical Malpractice Faq

I can see the time coming soon when any doctor prescribing highly addictive drugs, (any serious pain med) will be thought of as just as stupid and deserving of what they got, by other doctors unwilling to become martyrs, to the new public sentiment. And as to your intimation that YOU would take such risks in their place, well son I’m just going to HAVE to cry bullshit on that one!

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What about this situation? I went searching for a doctor 5 years ago as an alternative to the methadone clinic. I had been a heroin addict. Once I found my doctor, I explained to him that is like to stay on methadone as it worked for me, but I did not want to go to a clinic every day as it was not convenient. I was making decent money at the time and could afford to pay his fees. His solution? Break California law (at my disease of addiction-addled mind’s request) and write me a script for methadone, and said “I’ll just write in that you have back pain.” Keep in kind this was a suboxone Dr. He went on to prescribe 40mg methadone daily, 30mg of diazepam daily, 60mg of adderall daily, 20mg of Celexa, then on top of that my own home injections of testosterone cypionate.
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If we accept your claim on a Conditional Fee Agreement, we will always aim to beat a success fee offer by another firm. You should be aware that there may be deductions from your damages in relation to and after-the-event (ATE) insurance policy, this protects you from any adverse costs. Here at Been Let Down, we are highly experienced Solicitors who will maximise the damages you are entitled to, which gives Been Let Down a competitive edge over other Solicitors offering the same services.
Calitz explains that to bring a successful medical malpractice claim, you need to prove that the treatment you received deviated from a particular “standard of care”, and that it was the deviation (which can be an act or omission) from this standard that resulted in harm. The “standard of care” is defined as what a reasonably prudent medical provider would or would not have done under the same or similar circumstances.
Medical malpractice claims are incredibly complex cases, and the laws governing them vary from state to state. Even the most obvious malpractice claims will still require meeting numerous administrative, or claim filing, prerequisites, such as providing the doctor or hospital with notice, or even getting another doctor’s opinion. Some states even have shorter statute of limitations for malpractice claims.
Our law firm has the resources to build a strong claim for maximum damages. As our legal team prepares claims for damages, we often collaborate with experts in such areas as medicine, vocational rehabilitation and economics, as well as such specialties as neuropsychology, geriatrics, pediatrics or child development, depending on the specific circumstances of the case. In appropriate cases and with the permission and assistance of our client, our damages presentation may also include the creation of a “day-in-the-life” video to illustrate the ways in which negligent medical care has changed our client’s life. Our team goes above and beyond to demonstrate what full and fair compensation should be for our clients.

It is possible, however, to commit a criminal homicide based on wanton or reckless behavior. In other words, if someone acts with such disregard for the safety of others that death or serious injury is almost a given, this is often enough for certain types of criminal charges. However, doctors and other medical professionals are highly trained, very knowledgeable individuals. They are heavily regulated to prevent those with serious problems like substance abuse or mental disorders from causing harm. They are also under constant scrutiny and required to undergo continuing education to ensure that they are not engaging in techniques that could imperil a patient's life.


Our local surgery now has no permanent doctors, all have resigned. It used to be an 11 doctor practice. In addition most of the nursing staff have left. It is a two branch practice and one branch now closes two afternoons a week and recently they closed it another full day due to lack of staff. Even reception staff are leaving because of the way the practice is being mismanaged.
Every medical malpractice case is different and relies on a unique set of facts. However, there are scenarios that more commonly align with a medical malpractice case. For example, a nurse or medical technician may give a patient the wrong type of medication or dosage. Another reason for a medical malpractice case is if the hospital employee did not follow the treating physician’s instructions regarding the care of a patient.
The important thing is not suing, but getting you the medical  care you need. Have you tried contacting the medicaid office for your area? Have you spoken with the hospital social worker about any resources that  may be available to you? There are resources for people who can't afford medical care. Focus on getting access to medical care, and good luck.
The report by the Indiana Department of Health identified 21 surgeries on the wrong body parts and 4 wrong surgical procedures performed on patients in 2014. The problem is common enough that the federal Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations published a protocol for healthcare providers to follow that includes a “timeout process” to prevent wrong operations and wrong-site surgery. Unfortunately, a fifth of our hospitals have not adopted the protocol.
on a regular basis. Prescribe toxic drugs to children, teens, adults and the elderly, drugs known to create psychosis, anxiety, akathisia, abnormal thoughts, suicidal and homicidal thoughts. Drugs causing diabetes, tardive akathisia, metabolic syndrome, heart attacks... And they prescribe them in cocktail poly drugging format. Some of the real lunatics in this fake area also brain damage their victims with ECT.
These critics assert that these rate increases are causing doctors to go out of business or move to states with more favorable tort systems.[30] Not everyone agrees, though, that medical malpractice lawsuits are solely causing these rate increases.[31] A 2003 report from the General Accounting Office found multiple reasons for these rate increases, with medical malpractice lawsuits being the primary driver.[32] Despite noting multiple reasons for rate increases, the report goes on to state that the "GAO found that losses on medical malpractice claims-which make up the largest part of insurers’ costs-appear to be the primary driver of rate increases in the long run." More recent data has indicated that medical malpractice rates are generally no longer rising. In 2011, data pooled from the industry by the publication Medical Liability Monitor indicated that medical malpractice insurance rates had declined for four straight years. The decrease was seen in both states that had enacted tort reform and in states that had not, leading actuaries familiar with the data to suggest that patient safety and risk management campaigns had had a more significant effect.[33]
DJ I understand where you are coming from, and I also understand those that dont agree with you. I have 3 bulging disc/ degenerative disc disease. Until the age of 30 I never touched an opiate or abused anything for that matter. My injury stemmed for a high school sports injury, but I dealt with the pain by eating right, exercising and took a Tylenol when needed. At the age of 30 the pain started getting much worse I because my job and the businesses I owned demanded me to work long hours and were physically demanding. So when I just couldnt take it any longer I went to the doctor who prescribed me percocets for about 3 or 4 months and then referred me to pain mgmt. I really liked the doctor, he was kind, compassionate, empathetic, smart and unrelated he was interested in me as a person, he actually visited a few of my businesses, we didn’t hang out or anything but I thought of him as a friend in a way but understood we weren’t. So now that you understand this I want to make it very clear I never tried to take advantage of that, not once did I ever ask for a certain medication. I just felt blessed that I had a doctor that actually cared for my well being and that I was not just a jane doe diagnosed and treated by the statistics. He started me off with oxy and injections. The injections were not working so long story short we tried a wide variety of meds, most either didn’t work for me or I had an adverse reaction to. Finally after a few years I was put on opana and oxy and it worked. The problem was his practice got busy and so did he. The result was he was still nice but he did all the talking and it was mostly like”its been a couple months on this dose your tolerance has increased so let’s up your dosage”, until I was at 30mg opana 2x day and 30mg oxy 3x day. Things were fine for awhile but the drugs start to change my temperament. My work started to suffer, my relationships also were becoming strained, because my whole life revolved around my medications, yes I was pain free but at what cost? So here lies the the million dollar question. Who’s fault is it? Mine for wanting to be pain free and trusting that my doctor giving more and more was in my best interest, yes in a way it is my fault for being nieve to the fact I was going to beable to pop these powerful drugs for the rest of my life. So the government decides to crack down and me on this insane amount of opiates and doc takes meds away, what a sick cruel joke on me. So now knowing what I know, my doctor put me on opana because of kickbacks and kept increasing dosage because of $ and I know this because a majority of his patients are in the same boat, they topped out and all is fine till the government cracked down and doc got scared, reduced or dropped patient and we all are so surprised why the US is now flooded with heroin addicts. So my opinion is the doctors that were prescribing ridiculously large amounts to fatten there pockets, even if they weren’t doing for the kickbacks, and used tolerance or whatever, we trusted that they would have been smart enough to see what was happening in this country and when the government once again passed legislation without thinking about the result of there actions, these doctors would have a game plan, but no they all held up there hands and want to blame it on anybody but themselves. Shame on you doctor’s that liked playing the game while you were winning but quit and ran home crying when the rules of the game changed, that is why I hold you doctors responsible, and I do feel bad for the good ones that get fucked in the process, but didn’t us patients with real pain get fucked by doctor shoppers? Stand up for yourselves, get oganized and counter sued the government for passing legislation(unrealistic restrictions without making sure these poor people have a realistic way to get off theses doses safely, at no cost. Isn’t funny how these pill pushing doctor’s do a 180 because the big money can’t be made by having their patients hooked on powerful opiates so they jump ship accusing them off being addicts dropping them and putting them on suboxane which is not a pain medication and wonder why they have no choice but to become heroin addicts. I blame the doctors for turning us into pill addicts but I blame the government for turning us into heroin addicts. In the end tne patient loses because whoever is at fault the patient will suffer
Medical malpractice cases are inherently complex and difficult to prove. There is no law that says, “If this doctor failed to do X procedure in Y amount of time, negligence has occurred”. You’ll need to find a lawyer with experience in medical malpractice cases (these lawyers typically have a medical expert available to look into potential cases) to look at the facts of your case, and determine if all the required legal and medical elements are there, to justify pursuing a medical malpractice lawsuit.

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In 2013, BMJ Open performed a study in which they found that "failure to diagnose" accounted for the largest portion of medical malpractice claims brought against health professionals. Furthermore, the study found that the most common result of this negligence was death of the patient.[9] The other most common categories of malpractice include negligent treatment and failure to warn.
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld

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I had to change pain mgmt. clinics as the clinic I was in decided to implement a ceiling in terms of MME dosing that they are allowed to prescribe and I happened to be right at their ceiling (again – stable patient here, no changes on my side for 9yrs and they are the ones that put me in that dosing and it worked well – I know I’m a bit of a freak of nature in this way but there are people like me that can stay stable and not need frequent increases, though we are edge cases).
My responses to questions on Avvo are never intended as legal advice and must not be relied upon as legal advice. I give legal advice only in the course of an attorney-client relationship. Exchange of information through Avvo's Questions forum does not establish an attorney-client relationship with me. That relationship is established only by individual consultation and execution of a written agreement for legal services.

When contributory negligence first appeared in the repertoire of personal injury lawyers, the standards of proof needed to succeed were quite high and very severe. Originally, under the doctrine of contributory negligence if it were shown that the plaintiff contributed in any way to his injuries, he was barred from any recovery. This has been modified over time to permit the plaintiff to recover even if he contributed to his injuries, as long as his fault is under 50 percent. In these cases, recovery is relative to fault. For instance, if a jury finds a party’s injuries worth $100,000 and holds that the party was 25 percent at fault, the party’s recovery would be $75,000. On the other hand, if the jury found the party 60 percent at fault, the party would be barred from any recovery.
Arizona lawmakers in 2012 passed a similar bill to prohibit wrongful birth lawsuits, though the legislation included exceptions in cases of an “intentional or grossly negligent act or omission.” Arizona State Sen. Nancy Barto (R-Phoenix) introduced the bill because she claimed wrongful birth lawsuits negatively affect children with disabilities. “True malpractice suits,” Barto said, would be allowed to proceed.
Unfortunately, the answer is only maybe, and it may take a long time. American patients that opt to leave the United States to have procedures done overseas probably do not realize that they may be foregoing the legal protection of the American court system. This is part of the reason why procedures performed overseas are so much cheaper: other nations do not have the stringent legal and administrative protections required of American doctors. This could leave a patient bearing most of the brunt of any legal risks associated with such a procedure because it can be very difficult to successfully sue foreign doctors in the US or to bring an action as a foreign citizen overseas.
The biggest hurdle for patients to get over in bringing a claim is a law that sets up a defence for all professionals accused of negligence.  It says that if the professional acted in a way that was widely accepted in Australia by that professional’s peers as competent professional practice then the professional is not liable.  Note that ‘widely accepted’ does not necessarily mean that the majority of professionals have to agree to the practice.
Failure to warn a patient of known risks. Doctors have a duty to warn patients of known risks of a procedure or course of treatment -- this is known as the duty of informed consent. If a patient, once properly informed of possible risks, would have elected not to go through with the procedure, the doctor may be liable for medical malpractice if the patient is injured by the procedure (in a way that the doctor should have warned could happen). (To learn more, read Nolo's article Medical Malpractice: Informed Consent.)

This is where a “Pain Management” doctor should potentially be liable (your avg. doc should not – but those specially trained in this area have NO EXCUSE for this kind of mis-treatment of a patient with a solid history). This is all well documented, there is no valid excuse in forcing patients into withdrawl and destroying a weeks or more of their life (or their lives entirely in many cases) – the impact to your family and job are tremendous. It is exactly this kind of poor practice that leads people down the wrong path to things like heroin. I was fortunate and toughed it out (my wife was very supportive), having the new meds (though not effective enough to control my pain 24/7) was better than nothing but the withdrawal ..was ..terrible AND unnecessary.
Medical malpractice lawyers generally offer free initial consultations. Most rely on contingency fees, meaning that the patient never pays the lawyer. If the lawyer wins the case, the law firm takes a portion (usually about 1/3) of the award. If the lawyer loses the case, the lawyer usually is not paid, though the client may be on the hook for a few small costs.

The first element for your solicitor to prove if you are suing the NHS or a private doctor is that the medical professional or medical institution was negligent. Negligence is where the standard of medical care provided by the NHS or private hospital fell below the level expected of a professional in the field. For example, patients may be able to sue NHS hospitals because of failure to diagnose a medical condition, mistakes made in treatment such as surgery and use of improper or out of date treatment or medication.

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A steady uptick in medical malpractice cases can be attributed, in part at least, to the decline of religious fatalism. It was a pervasive belief that misfortune and injury were acts of God, meant to be construed as punishment for moral and religious transgressions. Overturning this belief may be considered a far-off ripple effect of The Enlightenment, a historical ‘moment' at which prominent European thinkers began to reject the notion that everything was determined by the will of an omnipotent God. As philosophers and scientists alike began to promulgate the idea that willful human action was the true determinant of fortune and misfortune, a fringe effect was the rise of medical malpractice litigation, a century or so later. As people began to accept that injury and misfortune could be attributed to human error and not God's will, they began to assert an entitlement to recompense if they suffered as a result of human error. This was a brick in the foundation of medical malpractice litigation.
When your doctor or other healthcare provider fails to provide to you the proper, acceptable standard of care or treatment, he or she has committed medical malpractice. The treatment can fall below the acceptable standard of care because of their mistakes, ignorance, negligence, lack of skill, misdiagnosis or other errors. The law holds doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals responsible for providing care at acceptable standards. When they deviate from those standards, they may be held accountable for medical malpractice. These claims are often quite complex, and the services of a hired medical professional are necessary in order to prevail. Michaels & Smolak uses the most qualified medical professionals, including medical doctors, to support their clients’ medical malpractice claims. If you want to find out more, contact us for a free consultation.
In order to establish negligence and sue the NHS, your solicitor will need to obtain expert evidence from a medical expert in the relevant medical field. So, if your claim is against a GP then normally your solicitor will obtain expert evidence from another GP. An experienced solicitor will know suitable and highly respected medical practitioners in numerous areas of specialty who are able to serve as a medical expert. The medical expert will review your medical records and in most cases needs to give you a medical examination before preparing his or her report.
Damage: The physical and/or monetary costs to the plaintiff that resulted from negligent acts by the medical provider. An example of damage would be a physician assistant’s failure to diagnose the right medical condition which then caused the patient to become sicker, to spend more money on additional therapy, and to incur lost wages for missing work.
Financial loss can include the future costs of caring for the patient. It can also include the patient’s future lost income where, as a result of the negligence, the patient is no longer able to work or to earn as much as he or she would otherwise.  Where a patient will need significant care support and will no longer be able to work, the amount of damages awarded when you bring a claim against the NHS or a hospital can be extremely high. 
Army Medical Malpractice Cancer $701,790 received by clients $250,000 attorneys' fees $48,209 litigation expenses Owen v. United States Darnall Army Community Hospital Our client underwent surgery at the U.S. Army MEDDAC in Nuremberg, Germany. Following surgery, our client transferred her care to DACH. Despite pathology results that revealed cancer, Ft.
The patient must also prove that the doctor's negligent misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis caused the patient's injury or condition to progress beyond where it normally would have -- had the correct diagnose been made in a timely manner -- and that this progression had a negative impact upon treatment. For example, because of a delayed cancer diagnosis the patient had to undergo a more severe treatment regimen (such as chemotherapy) or the patient died because the cancer had metastasized and no longer responded to treatment. Sometimes a patient can show harm even if the condition can still be treated. For example, with some cancers a delay in treatment increases the risk of recurrence.
Here is the step most people don’t realize. If the patient’s lawyer wants to take the case further, they need to get an expert witness. That will cost them a lot of money. So if the case is weak, they will do some sort of calculation. For example, they will say they spent 50 hours so far, and they want to make 10,000 for that, so they will offer to dismiss the case for 20,000, which they will split with the patient. Many cases will settle at this point, because it’s easier to spend a little money and avoid the massive costs of going to court, as well as avoiding the risk of a big payout to the patient. This is the reason I say it’s easy to sue a doctor for malpractice, lose the case, but still make some money.

Special medical malpractice review panels. Many states require the patient to first submit the claim to a malpractice review panel. This panel of experts will hear arguments, review evidence and expert testimony, and then decide whether malpractice has occurred. The panel decision does not replace an actual medical malpractice lawsuit, and the panel cannot award damages, but it's a hoop the patient must jump through before getting to court. The findings of the review panel can be presented in court, and courts often rely on a review panel's finding of no medical malpractice to throw out a case before it goes to trial.


Back in 1984, the extrapolated statistics from relatively few records in only several states of the United States estimated that between 44,000-98,000 people annually die in hospitals because of medical errors.[3] Much work has been done since then, including work by the author of that study who moved on from those low estimates back in the 1990s. For example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention currently says that 75,000 patients die annually, in hospitals alone, from infections alone - just one cause of harm in just one kind of care setting.[4] From all causes there have been numerous other studies, including "A New, Evidence-based Estimate of Patient Harms Associated with Hospital Care" by John T. James, PhD[5] that estimates 400,000 unnecessary deaths annually in hospitals alone. Using these numbers, medical malpractice is the third leading cause of death in the United States, only behind heart disease and cancer. Less than one quarter of care takes place in hospitals. Across all care settings the numbers are higher.
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In order to succeed with a medical malpractice claim you must prove that your doctor or other health care provider’s treatment of you was “negligent”, which in medical malpractice cases is defined as treatment that falls below the “standard of care” of practice for a reasonable practitioner in a particular area of medicine. Just proving you had a bad result from a medical treatment or procedure is not sufficient; some bad results can occur even when your doctor was not negligent. Sometimes there are “known risks” that are unavoidable with certain surgeries, treatments or medication. Further, even proving a departure from the standard of care is not enough! You must then prove that the mistake or error “proximately caused” the injury or damage to you. For example, your doctor may have departed from a reasonable standard of care in not diagnosing properly your fractured wrist. Maybe he completely overlooked the fracture. But what if he had properly diagnosed it? Would your wrist be any better now? If a proper diagnosis would not have lead to a better result, then there is no “causation” between your doctor’s negligence and your injury. In other words, “no harm, no foul”. A good medical malpractice lawyer knows how to analyze carefully the “elements” (what you have to prove) of a medical malpractice case. He or she also knows how to present these elements to a jury. The Syracuse medical malpractice lawyers of Michaels & Smolak has the skill, experience and expertise to maximize your chances of prevailing. So contact us for a free consultation.
Thank you for your answer. All I care about is his getting punished more than getting anything back. My medications cost around $3000 a month and my health will continue to deteriorate until I can see another GI which will not be any sooner than 1 month. Does that not count as negligence. I find it very hard to believe that a GI with 23 yrs of experience does not know about this disease which has commercials on TV every other day.
Communication and Resolution Programs: When a medical error is identified, the patient is approached by the physician and/or health care system and they mutually arrive at a settlement. Several laws have been passed to facilitate communication and resolution (Mandatory presuit notification laws, apology laws and State-facilitated dispute resolution laws).
Our lawyers are focused on medical malpractice claims. We have extensive experience handling complicated claims involving medical errors, and our knowledgeable legal team is prepared to thoroughly investigate your case. We will need to show exactly what happened and identify every party that may be held responsible. Our team will gather all the evidence and consult with outside medical experts to show that there is a clear basis for your claim.

Many GP surgeries have the problem that people book appointments but don’t turn up or cancel too late to be very helpful. The last time I wanted an appointment I was asked if I could come an hour later, which I did. I can’t remember the last time I needed to see a GP urgently but my strategy would be to phone up and ask if there were any cancellations or just go to the surgery and wait.
Doctor Mistake, No Injury to Patient – Not all medical errors cause injury to the patient.  For example, a doctor may prescribe the incorrect dosage of medication.  The patient then takes the wrong dose, has a temporary reaction, and reports it to the doctor or pharmacist.  If the error is caught before the patient suffers any serious or lasting injuries, then this would be considered a mistake on the doctor’s fault but would not be considered medical malpractice.  The lack of harm to the patient does not erase the fact that the doctor made a serious mistake.  In this situation, however, this would not be considered medical malpractice by the doctor because there is no lasting harm to the patient.
People have a tendency to downplay their injuries because they do not want to be seen by others as complaining or needy. In fact, those that are more severely injured tend to downplay their injuries the most. Before you are convinced that your injuries don’t warrant some type of compensation, it is best to be examined by an independent medical expert. You may be entitled to lost wages, medical expenses, or compensation for pain and suffering.
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