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Medical Malpractice Jury Selection | Medical Malpractice Florida Statute

My problem now is I feel like a shell of who I was, a very successful sale manager earning 6 figures+ to now, not being able to hold a job and being on disability. I can't remember things or conversations that I have had. I can't be in places where there are too many people, forget a mall or a nice restaurant. My wife and daughter have affectionately resorted to nicknaming me "turtle" because I can't keep up. I just roll with it but it really hurts knowing I was once the sole provider of a very nice lifestyle for my family to becoming this exhausted, tired, uninterested person. I speak with no one, I have not 1 friend and for the most part, never leave the house. My brain feels scrambled all the time, foggy.
Most people are able to get to at least second base with a failure to warn claim.  Fewer are able to prove that the doctor simply did not talk to them about that particular risk, although there are cases where a patient’s word has been accepted over a doctor’s insistence that a warning was given.  Getting copies of the doctor’s medical notes can help with this element.
Based on a summary it is extremely difficult to give a yes or no "is this malpractice" answer. The medical malpractice law comes right out and states that medical malpractice requires more than simply an unfortunate medical result. Professional medical liability is based on proof that the care that was given fell below the average standard of care, and that damages resulted as a result of that substandard care.
For instance, a boy named William Parr was born with a lump in his leg that was diagnosed as a tumor when he was eight years old. Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital performed a procedure to remove it. But a complication occurred during the procedure that resulted in a burn, which caused significant pain, refused to heal and became infected. The medical team tried for some time to fix the problem, but eventually the boy’s leg had to be amputated.
The lady in risk management was very nice and very sympathetic and apologized profusely for everyone who had behaved badly. She forced the doctor to send in a prescription for the correct quantity of the med he had lied about and claimed was an opiod. I checked with my mail-in pharmacy and with two local pharmacists where I live and they all said that my med is definitely not an opiod and that a 90 day quantity is done all the time. So I had to pay almost $80.00 for the 30 day script the incompetent doctor sent in, and then when he was forced to send in another script that was correct, I will have to pay $120.00. Had he done what he was supposed to do from the start, I would not have had to pay the unnecessary expense of the $80.00. So, I know my experience was not nearly as harrowing as many of the ones I have read, but I have to agree with all of you. There really are some incredibly bad, incompetent, and I'd go so far as to say evil doctors out there. Who knows? Maybe they are crazy too, and they are taking it out on their patients and they just haven't been caught yet. All I know is that I've had incompetent doctors before, but I have NEVER had one who was just so nasty, so unprofessional, and who made me feel like I just needed to take a shower after I'd been in his presence. People like that should have their licenses revoked. They do more harm than good and they have no business being in this line of work.
Unfortunately, the answer is only maybe, and it may take a long time. American patients that opt to leave the United States to have procedures done overseas probably do not realize that they may be foregoing the legal protection of the American court system. This is part of the reason why procedures performed overseas are so much cheaper: other nations do not have the stringent legal and administrative protections required of American doctors. This could leave a patient bearing most of the brunt of any legal risks associated with such a procedure because it can be very difficult to successfully sue foreign doctors in the US or to bring an action as a foreign citizen overseas.

Another potential cause of action is intentional infliction of emotional distress. This is based on a doctor’s outrageous conduct that intentionally or recklessly causes a patient to suffer severe emotional distress. This must be beyond a mere slight as it must be something that would outrage society. The common law tort required a physical manifestation of injury, but most jurisdictions no longer require this element. This cause of action has been successful in some cases in which patients recorded their doctors performing medical treatment while mocking and ridiculing the patient to a serious degree.
In most cases, doctors are not considered the direct employee of the hospital, but rather independent contractors. However, in some situations, doctors are employees. Doctors are more likely to be found to be employees of the hospital if the hospital controls the doctor’s working hours, vacation time and the fee schedule for the doctor’s services. In a few exceptions, a hospital may be found to be liable for a non-employee doctor’s services.
Other states require that you file an "affidavit of merit" (or a similarly-named document) with the court when you first begin the lawsuit. This is a sworn statement from a qualified medical expert testifying that you appear to have a valid case for medical malpractice. Once again, if you don’t provide the expert affidavit at the beginning of the case, the court will throw the lawsuit out. Depending on the state, there might be either a screening panel or an expert affidavit requirement or both or other similar requirements.
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