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Medical Malpractice In South Africa | Medical Malpractice Gainesville Fl

And don’t kid yourself. If you think that your doctor just made a mistake and that it won’t happen again – think again. Chances are, if he made a mistake with you, he very well could have done it before and will do it again. Don’t be dissuaded by your doctor’s apologies or his downplaying of your injuries. An apology won’t pay for your medical expenses, and it certainly doesn’t ensure that he realizes the full consequences of his negligible actions.
Although the laws of medical malpractice differ significantly between nations, as a broad general rule liability follows when a health care practitioner does not show a fair, reasonable and competent degree of skill when providing medical care to a patient.[2] If a practitioner holds himself out as a specialist a higher degree of skill is required.[2] Jurisdictions have also been increasingly receptive to claims based on informed consent, raised by patients who allege that they were not adequately informed of the risks of medical procedures before agreeing to treatment.[2]
Prior to his presidency, Abraham Lincoln was a distinguished medical malpractice attorney, taking on cases for physicians and patients alike. Lincoln represented two defendant physicians who treated a man when a chimney fell on him. The physicians applied splints to the patient's legs, assuming he would not survive his injuries. The patient survived and was left with a crooked right leg when the splints were removed. The man recruited six attorneys, 15 physician witnesses and 21 other witnesses in his suit against the two physicians. Lincoln presented the town's only other 12 physicians. Harking to the modern statute of limitations and the importance of fresh and compelling evidence, Lincoln believed the best defense was the passage of time and so he obtained many postponements. The trial resulted in a hung jury.

There is a limited amount of time within which a patient can make a medical malpractice claim against a medical professional. While the actual statutes of limitations for these claims vary by state, you will always have at least a year after the injury has taken place. The list below contains the statute of limitations for each state. Note that in many states, the statute contains considerations regarding when a patient discovered or realized medical negligence occurred. This is referred to as the discovery rule.


As fear over “spurious claims” grew, and the lucrative nature of malpractice payouts became clear, legislation began to account for the concept of shared fault in medical malpractice claims. Many states arrived at the conclusion that a medical professional was not always exclusively responsible for the injury incurred. The doctrines of contributory and comparative fault allow the jury to assess the claim and assign a correct amount of blame to plaintiff as well as the defendant. Allowing fault to be shared promotes responsibility for both parties.
Navy Medical Malpractice Birth Injury $2,322,359 received by clients with lifetime benefits $600,000 attorneys' fees $77,641 litigation expenses Carman v. United States Portsmouth Naval Medical Center During labor and delivery, Navy providers failed to timely respond to our client's placental abruption causing permanent and severe brain damage to her baby.
The doctor's negligence caused the injury. Because many malpractice cases involve patients that were already sick or injured, there is often a question of whether what the doctor did, negligent or not, actually caused the harm. For example, if a patient dies after treatment for lung cancer, and the doctor did do something negligent, it could be hard to prove that the doctor's negligence caused the death rather than the cancer. The patient must show that it is "more likely than not" that the doctor's incompetence directly caused the injury. Usually, the patient must have a medical expert testify that the doctor's negligence caused the injury.

If the injured patient is able to prove – through qualified expert testimony – that the doctor committed an act of medical negligence, then the patient has satisfied the first step of proving a malpractice claim against the doctor. However, the injured patient must also be able to show that the doctor’s negligence resulted in certain injuries or damages.
You must make your claim against the correct person or entity. In some cases, you would sue the doctor directly, but in other cases you might sue the hospital or health care system. In Washington, D.C. you have three years from the date of injury to file a medical malpractice lawsuit. You must make sure that you take action immediately when you have been injured at the hands of a trusted physician or another medical care provider.

Unfortunately worker compensation doctor are not your personal doctors and it is not their job to help you. They only serve the role to provide medical information and determinated for review by the board. If you're not pleased with your current attorney I suggest you tell him and if that does not resolve the problem then you should retain a new attorney


There are two steps to complaining. The first is to makes a complaint to the NHS hospital trust or Primary Care Practice where the treatment was received, under their own complaints procedure (which they will provide on request). If you are unsatisfied with the response you receive, you can then move to the second stage, which is to refer the matter to the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman.
The 10th US Court of Appeals reviewed various similar informed consent cases and found that courts took different views on whether or not lying to a patient about a physician's background could be considered a breach of informed consent. Some courts held that doctors could be found liable only if they lied regarding the risks of the proposed treatment. In this case, the appellate court decided that the patient should have had a chance to make the argument, and sent the case back for retrial on that issue.

My wife answered that question as you would have all doctors answer it, with a YES. Now that same patient who accused her of being cold, and having no empathy for their unbearable pain, is being SUED for everything she’s got because they couldn’t take responsibility for their own misuse of ADDICTIVE drugs. There is no such thing as chronic pain control WITHOUT potential dependance/addiction, and despite the constant pleas of ignorance in courtrooms all over this country, every adult in this society KNOWS THAT.


The doctor acted negligently. The doctor acted negligently if the doctor failed to ask you certain questions, forgot to send the blood test to the proper lab, gave a fake name for your illness and other practices which a similar doctor with the same experience would never have done. To prove this, you will have to show that a reasonable doctor would have recognized your medical problem from your symptoms and diagnosed you appropriately.


To add indirectly to Jeremy,s post a “startling ” piece of news has reached me from the Home of far-right Capitalism in relation to health care .AS you know the biggest debt in the US is health care not a mortgage many people taking their whole lives to pay off the medical charges “Obamacare ” was introduced but highly criticised by insurance companies and BB who were in the medical business . But hold on the great State of Colorado could become the first US State to replace it with —hold on —- an equivalent of the UK NHS — dont all jump up with indignation shouting –never ! we wont let it its “un- American ” they actually want to impose a tax hike on Colorado residents to pay for it –$38 billion of 10 % on the payroll tax –notice in this country cameron is using that as an excuse to Privatise the NHS . It would mean all residents would have EQUAL care – no gold-silver or bronze care and they could chose any doctor and specialist whether in or out of the network and deductibles would also be elimated . US BB medical are spitting fire as is Insurance groups ,do I need to say why ? well yes some might still think the US is run in a philanthropic manner —Profit -money $Billions – it will be interesting to see how far it gets and whether the Colorado residents vote it in ,there again they voted in Bernie Sanders so there is a chance . I look forward to watching massive funds being pumped into media advertising telling the people how its too dear when US medical costs are enormous even priced down to napkins and face masks etc etc.
Have you been injured due to military hospital medical malpractice? Under United States tort law, federal employees are not personally liable for most torts they commit in the course of their work. Instead, you can only hold those employees responsible using a special law called the Federal Tort Claims Act. This includes Army, Navy, and Air Force hospitals.In some respects, FTCA cases are quite different from ordinary tort cases. In such a case, the injured party may not file a lawsuit against the government until he or she has exhausted all administrative remedies. The injured party must first file an administrative claim with the proper agency of the United States government within a limited amount of time. Whitehurst, Harkness, Brees, Cheng, Alsaffar, Higginbotham, and Jacob, PLLC, has experience in representing injured parties at the administrative claim stage and throughout trial in federal courts all over the United States.
Expert witnesses, copies of medical records, deposition and witness fees, medical exams -- all of these things cost money. And if you lose your case, you could very well be on the hook for thousands or tens of thousands of dollars in expenses - depending on your legal fee agreement. Is your case important enough to you that you feel the potential financial benefit outweighs the risk?
The injury resulted in significant damages - Medical malpractice lawsuits are extremely expensive to litigate, frequently requiring testimony of numerous medical experts and countless hours of deposition testimony. For a case to be viable, the patient must show that significant damages resulted from an injury received due to the medical negligence. If the damages are small, the cost of pursuing the case might be greater than the eventual recovery. To pursue a medical malpractice claim, the patient must show that the injury resulted in disability, loss of income, unusual pain, suffering and hardship, or significant past and future medical bills.
There is a statute of limitations (or time limit in which you can file a lawsuit) for medical malpractice cases. This limit varies from state to state, but in general it is about two years from when the injury occurred. To ensure you file a claim before the statute of limitations is up, you should reach out to a medical malpractice attorney as soon after you realize doctor error occurred.
We have reached the point where for many people the NHS cannot attend to their teeth, and some NHS Trusts are now saying that they will not replace people’s hip and knee joints unless they are in unbearable agony, so private clinics will no doubt spring up to satisfy that need. That numerous medical professionals and nurses are tied up doing unnecessary cosmetic procedures is another cause for concern.
The concept of medical responsibility can be traced back to the Code of Hammurabi, which is an extensive legal document from ancient Mesopotamia. The Code of Hammurabi states that, “If the doctor has treated a gentlemen with a lancet of bronze and has caused the gentleman to die, or has opened an abscess of the eye for a gentleman with a bronze lancet, and has caused the loss of the gentleman’s eye, one shall cut off his hands” (Smith 1931 as cited within Bal 2009). Of course, penalties for malpractice in most modern, developed nations are much more civilized. However, the Code of Hammurabi introduced the concept of holding medical professionals accountable for deaths or injuries that could have reasonably been prevented.

Our lawyers are focused on medical malpractice claims. We have extensive experience handling complicated claims involving medical errors, and our knowledgeable legal team is prepared to thoroughly investigate your case. We will need to show exactly what happened and identify every party that may be held responsible. Our team will gather all the evidence and consult with outside medical experts to show that there is a clear basis for your claim.
Valid observation!!! Big time… as someone who survives with chronic pain it is ultimately and solely my responsibility to manage self control. And if I don’t I have no one to blame but myself. I’ve read stories and have watched documentaries about people and families blaming Doctors I absolutely do not agree unless a doctor ihas history and is “well aware” the patient has an addictive type personality or does not make the patient aware of the addictive risk to the meds.,which that does not happen! I lost a friend to an overdose six years ago,(a R.N. who knew better!!) never once did I entertain the thought the doctor was responsible, No disrespect to those who have addictions but I’ve gone to the E.D. for help in the past before my surgery where they were so kind as to give me a shot of Gods knows what,I don’t remember asking or caring. It absolutely relieved me of my pain but I feared and hated that feeling so much. Its hard for me to understand who would want to live with that scary feeling everyday all day long. Doctors intentions when giving us medicines is to help us, don’t let them be the scape goats to your weaknesses, if you get addicted its your fault and you know it your fault. Own it,be accountable and get help. Put blame where blame is due. I’m just saying…..

Sounds like a problem I had 5 months ago . I wakened in the morning to extreme pain ,it just got worse till I was doubled up in pain gasping out loud it got so bad I fainted several times . It died down slightly for a few hours then came back strong ,not one to rush to a doctor I suffered it for several days but it just got so bad I couldn’t look after my chair-bound wife and she ended up phoning the doctor who told me to come to the surgery. I practically crawled down the road after tests it turned out I was passing blood due to stones in the kidney -advice given keep drinking till you pass it . Anybody who has had this will know apart from cancer its the worst pain you can feel -no hospital journey to break it up – it took a WEEK for it to pass and the same 5 months for me to recover as I was as weak as water and thought “my number was up ” .
I confess to having booked an appointment for a blood test recently and when I put it on my computer/phone forgot to set an alert. The surgery also failed to send a text reminder. Both worked this morning. GP surgeries and out-patient departments often have notices about the large number of failed appointments. In an ideal world everyone would turn up for appointments on time but few of us are perfect.
The South Dakota surgeon had been called to vouch for the expertise of one of his partners whose patient had suffered a stroke and permanent disability after an operation. The problem was Aanning had, in his own mind, questioned his colleague’s skill. His partner’s patients had suffered injuries related to his procedures. But Aanning understood why his partner’s attorney had called him as a witness: Doctors don’t squeal on doctors.
Medical malpractice occurs when a patient is harmed by a doctor (or other medical professional) who fails to competently perform his or her medical duties. The rules about medical malpractice -- from when you must bring your lawsuit to whether you must notify the doctor ahead of time -- vary from state to state. But there are some general principals and broad categories of rules that apply to most medical malpractice cases. Here's an overview of the law and some of these special rules.
I thought my first encounter with my new psychiatrist was traumatic but after reading everyone's comments I don't feel like I was abused as badly as so many of you were. I am doing research because this doctor was so rude and unprofessional that I actually was traumatized when I left his office after our first session. After reading and doing some research I have found that unfortunately I can not sue him for medical malpractice but you can bet I am going to report him to every medical organization I can. I have already gone to the hospital and spoken to upper management and they have forced him to prescribe my medication in the correct quantity after he lied to me in session and told me he could only prescribe a 30 day quantity. How am I supposed to make it through the other 2 months before my next appointment with him if I only have a 30 day supply? Idiot. He was irritated with me because even though he had my chart (my regular doctor abruptly left her practice 8 days before my scheduled appointment with her) and I was shuffled to this clown and they sent all my records to him (or so they said). He kept asking ME which of the meds listed on my chart were my psych meds and got irritated when I told him I didn't know. That's when I started to get nervous. If he was a real doctor, how is it he couldn't pick out the psych meds from everything else on my list? He asked me why I was taking so many anti-depressants. I thought to myself--that's a stupid question-I am the patient, I didn't prescribe them so how would I be able to even begin to answer that question? He explained that giving anti-depressants to a bipolar was like giving them rocket fuel. Then he snickered and said that maybe I had pissed off my last doctor( I suppose as an explanation for why she was overmedicating me and according to his opinion after seeing me for all of 15 minutes that I was too manic) As he perused my chart he saw something he didn't like and he said, "Shit!" I thought ok, that wasn't very professional. As he proceeded to ask questions, when I answered them (or I should say tried to answer them) he would interrupt me when he felt he'd gotten the information he needed and he'd say, " ok, that's all I need to know". He cut me off mid-sentence repeatedly as if I was wasting his time and he wanted me to just shut up once he got what he wanted for his purposes. One of my conditions is bipolar and somehow the question of being highly sexual came up and he said, "Oh, so you were promiscuous." I have never had anyone use that kind of terminology to describe that particular symptom. I have read books, magazines, done on-line research about bipolar ever since my diagnosis and I have not encountered that wording to describe the condition. I was shocked to hear a doctor use that term. I felt like he had called me a whore. At least that's how I felt. He asked me about working with other doctors and I shared that I had one doctor who never shared or gave any feedback and he laughed and said, "Well, then you won't like me, because I don't give feedback either." I thought to myself, how is it funny that a psychiatrist doesn't give a patient any kind of feedback at all? How is he going to now how my meds are working or if they aren't, and how am I supposed to know the same thing if he never interacts with me?" The icing on the cake was when he abruptly stopped speaking in the middle of his instructions about my meds and said, "OK, time's up, our session is over." I was so surprised I really had no idea what to say. I sat there for a minute trying to collect myself and to see if he was serious and he just kept staring at me, so I said,"Um, well, if you think it's not important to give me instructions on my meds, then I guess I have to leave since you are telling me to go." I was floundering at this point because I honestly had no idea what I was going to do. They tell you to take your meds, take your meds, take your meds, because it is so important that you stay on your regime once your doctor gets you started, and so many people with bipolar stop once they feel better, but I knew how wild my life had been before I was finally diagnosed so I am totally dedicated to staying on medications and here was my doctor kicking me out of his office without my meds. I was totally freaked out. Then he said, "No, I'm going to finish giving you your instructions, but I wanted to make a point of it that you were late and that now you are cutting into my next patient's time. I had been on time but I did stop at the desk to write my co-pay which took all of maybe 2 or 3 minutes. He finished his instructions to me and as I was leaving he said, "Remember, if you want respect, you have to give respect." And then he instructed me to be early to my next visit. I suppose to be sure that I didn't spend 3 minutes writing out my co-pay. I was so freaked out, I felt like a criminal for almost three days because I believed I had been so bad. Thank goodness, I've had several good doctors over the years, and as I processed it more and more I started to get angry. Really, really angry. I won't even go into the run around I got from the sorry excuse they have for a patient liason who was absolutely no help. As a matter of fact, after dealing with her, I was even angrier. I was torn between pursuing the matter further or just letting it go because I knew I was going to run out of meds in 30 days and then what? But this week after seeing my talk therapist and being able to compare my reactions to hers, I realized that HE was the one who had been wildly inappropriate and that he had been unprofessional, rude, and actually, just downright mean. I have no idea why people like that are even allowed to practice medicine. Especially the kind of medicine where they can really mess someone up with medication and with inappropriate or cruel behavior. So I drove to the hospital, demanded to see anyone who was not that excuse for a patient liason, got a printed copy of my patient's rights (which I did not know existed had I not seen them posted on the wall at the front desk when I went in that day) They called and I got to speak to someone in risk management (so apparently the patient liason person lied to me when she said she did not report to anyone and refused to let me have the corporate address and said they only people above her were the doctors and they would not want to speak to me about my issue)

Another potential cause of action is intentional infliction of emotional distress. This is based on a doctor’s outrageous conduct that intentionally or recklessly causes a patient to suffer severe emotional distress. This must be beyond a mere slight as it must be something that would outrage society. The common law tort required a physical manifestation of injury, but most jurisdictions no longer require this element. This cause of action has been successful in some cases in which patients recorded their doctors performing medical treatment while mocking and ridiculing the patient to a serious degree.
The negligence caused a negative legal outcome - It is not sufficient that an attorney simply was negligent for a legal malpractice claim to be valid. The plaintiff must also prove that there were legal, monetary or other negative ramifications that were caused by the negligence. An unfavorable outcome by itself is not malpractice. There must be a direct causative link between a violation of the standard of professional conduct and the negative result.
In the United States, there are many jurisdictional issues that could bar bringing a claim in an American court. Litigants would have to establish that the doctor had sufficient contacts with the United States for it to exert jurisdiction over him or her. Even if the court does find that it can take jurisdiction over the case, it has to determine which nation and state’s laws would apply.
Investigation: Before a case is even filed with the Connecticut courts, it is essential that an initial investigation of the matter be completed. Our team works with medical experts in the field to determine whether medical negligence was committed by your doctor or any other medical professional. Our lawyers then determine how that negligence caused your injury.
In the doctrine of joint and several liability among tortfeasors, when there are multiple tortfeasors (“guilty” parties), all parties are equally liable for the damages caused to the injured party. This doctrine is quite harsh. For example, if the driver of a truck hits a pedestrian at night and the jury holds that the city is 15 percent responsible because it did not properly maintain the lighting at that portion of the road and the truck driver, who is 85 percent at fault, is uninsured, unemployed, and without assets, the city can be made to pay 100 percent of the damages. Under the doctrine of contribution, one tortfeasor may sue a fellow tortfeasor to recover any damages paid in excess of the proportion of fault. In most comparative fault states liability is the proportionate responsibility of each party.
Prior to his presidency, Abraham Lincoln was a distinguished medical malpractice attorney, taking on cases for physicians and patients alike. Lincoln represented two defendant physicians who treated a man when a chimney fell on him. The physicians applied splints to the patient's legs, assuming he would not survive his injuries. The patient survived and was left with a crooked right leg when the splints were removed. The man recruited six attorneys, 15 physician witnesses and 21 other witnesses in his suit against the two physicians. Lincoln presented the town's only other 12 physicians. Harking to the modern statute of limitations and the importance of fresh and compelling evidence, Lincoln believed the best defense was the passage of time and so he obtained many postponements. The trial resulted in a hung jury.

Anyone familiar with the Hippocratic oath understands the undeniable bond between medical care and ethics—ideally, physicians are driven by the desire to help patients, not hurt them. Yet, harm does sometimes occur, and patients have the right to hold such doctors accountable in a court of law. While the topic of not telling the truth poses more of an ethical question than a legal one, there are established legal boundaries for medical professionals that, when crossed, could justify a lawsuit.
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