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Medical Malpractice Boise Idaho | Medical Malpractice Dallas

I think that success rates of surgeries for each doctor ought to be recorded and published on the internet and all malpractice suits and judgments against doctors ought to be there, too. This is not at ALL the same as a patient wanting to know personal information about the life of their shrink. Face it. Some surgeons botch surgeries over and over and others are great. I consider the cited case malpractice.
If you qualify for compensation in the form of damages paid, you will most likely receive ‘Compensatory Damages’. These are based on your financial losses as a result of the malpractice including medical bills for extra treatment and earnings lost during your recovery period. Non-economic damages are intended as compensation for psychological, physical harm and distress.

In most cases, a hospital is liable in the legal sense only if an employee’s negligence or incompetence results in injury to a patient. A medical malpractice lawsuit may be the proper course of action if a nurse, an aide, a technician, or any other hospital employee injures a patient by negligently performing or failing to perform a job-related task.
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Navy Medical Malpractice Birth Injury $12,500,000 settlement $9,183,752 received by clients with lifetime benefits $3,125,000 attorneys' fees $191,248 litigation expenses Brown v. United States Naval Branch Health Clinic, Millington, TN Navy doctors failed to properly prescribe prenatal vitamins containing folic acid which resulted in our client suffering a devastating spinal
Sometimes, even permanent damage doesn’t have major financial implications for you. Some malpractice verdicts result in the payment of damages amounting to $250,000 or even less. Although this might sound like a lot of money, you have to remember that your costs will also be high. You will have to call on legal and medical experts, and at the end of the day, you might not gain a significant amount.
In many jurisdictions, a medical malpractice lawsuit is initiated officially by the filing and service of a summons and complaint. The parties subsequently engage in discovery,"[2] a process through which documents such as medical records are exchanged, and depositions are taken by parties involved in the lawsuit. A deposition involves the taking of statements made under oath about the case. Certain conversations are not discoverable due to issues of privilege, a legal protection against discovery,[4] but most conversations between the parties and witnesses are discoverable.
As for the marital stress, how did it get to court? Let's say the couple asks the psychiatrist if she's been divorced. I say she must either say yes, or say I won't tell you. Her choice. It would not be OK for her to lie. At that point the couple can find someone else. No damages. No court. When you say "must be disclosed," do you mean the court would hold that the psychiatrist should volunteer the information? First you would need an expert to testify to that. Then there would have to be damages, and proximate cause. Seems like a real stretch.
The act of filing a complaint against a physician triggers a state medical board investigation of the physician for possible disciplinary action.  Realistically, there is only an extremely small chance that your complaint will result in disciplinary action against the physician.  Because state medical boards are composed of doctors, they likely feel a personal and professional kinship with the people they regulate and may be hesitant to discipline another member of their own profession.
In order to prove medical negligence, one must show that their doctor deviated from the accepted level of medical care that could have been reasonably expected from a physician. Deviations that may support a medical malpractice claim include: surgical errors; medication errors; infections from hospitals; delayed diagnosis of cancer; cerebral palsy; paralysis; pulmonary embolus; spinal cord injury; strokes, heart attacks; brain injury; breast cancer; birth injury; tools, sponges, towels or objects left behind in your body after surgery; surgery on the wrong site; treatment without your informed consent; being given the wrong medication or the wrong dose; being treated with unsterile equipment; or a misdiagnosis or failure to diagnose a serious condition.

Doctor Mistake, Injury is Minor – This category encompasses situations in which a doctor misdiagnoses an injury (perhaps an ankle sprain) and then quickly corrects the misdiagnosis.  Like the no-injury scenario described above, the patient would not have a case for medical malpractice against the doctor.  Because the doctor quickly corrected the mistake, the patient suffered no damage.
But, anon, a successful suit doesn't remove a bad doc from practice. Only a licensure action can guarantee that. Suing someone out of a need to punish them may accomplish little. The real purpose of civil suits is to make the plaintiff whole. I suspect even "punitive" damages, if they're ever awarded in malpractice suits, would be covered by insurance.
A study by RAND Corp. researchers published in October 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that laws restricting medical-malpractice suits do not reduce the amount of "defensive medicine" or reduce health-care costs. The researchers, led by Daniel A. Waxman, examined 3.8 million Medicare patient records from hospital emergency departments from 1997 to 2011, comparing care in three states that enacted strict malpractice reform laws about a decade earlier (Georgia, Texas and South Carolina) to care in neighboring states that did not enact such laws. The study found that the laws had no effect on whether doctors ordered resource-intensive care (e.g., CT or MRI scans and hospitalization).[55][56][57]
The injured patient must show that the physician acted negligently in rendering care, and that such negligence resulted in injury. To do so, four legal elements must be proven: (1) a professional duty owed to the patient; (2) breach of such duty; (3) injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages. This includes doing nothing when they should have done something. This may be considered an act of omission or a negligence.
Andrew W. Norfleet, Esquire Helping disabled individuals throughout Pennsylvania. awn@norlaflaw.com www.norlaflaw.com DISCLAIMER: This post is intended as general information applicable only to the state of Pennsylvania and is personal in nature, not professional in nature. The information given is based strictly upon the facts provided. This post is not intended to create an attorney client relationship, or to provide any specific guarantee of confidentiality
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Yahoo fait partie d’Oath. Oath et ses partenaires ont besoin de votre consentement pour accéder à votre appareil et utiliser vos données, notamment votre position géographique, afin de comprendre vos centres d’intérêt, de diffuser des publicités personnalisées et de mesurer leur efficacité. Oath vous présentera également des publicités personnalisées sur les produits de ses partenaires. En savoir plus.
As fear over “spurious claims” grew, and the lucrative nature of malpractice payouts became clear, legislation began to account for the concept of shared fault in medical malpractice claims. Many states arrived at the conclusion that a medical professional was not always exclusively responsible for the injury incurred. The doctrines of contributory and comparative fault allow the jury to assess the claim and assign a correct amount of blame to plaintiff as well as the defendant. Allowing fault to be shared promotes responsibility for both parties.

I didn’t and don’t have cancer….I have 2 disk in my neck that are bulging and both hands needed carpal tunnel surgery…my dr gave me 120 10 mg hydrcodone a month, 120 tramadol a month, 90 oxycodone a month and 60 dulauda a month plus Valium and 90 adderall. ….then cold turkey dismissed me, I just list my insurance but paid cash everytime I went….I’m going through he’ll now
It is possible, however, to commit a criminal homicide based on wanton or reckless behavior. In other words, if someone acts with such disregard for the safety of others that death or serious injury is almost a given, this is often enough for certain types of criminal charges. However, doctors and other medical professionals are highly trained, very knowledgeable individuals. They are heavily regulated to prevent those with serious problems like substance abuse or mental disorders from causing harm. They are also under constant scrutiny and required to undergo continuing education to ensure that they are not engaging in techniques that could imperil a patient's life.
Firstly , WebMD won't help at all (hasn't really helped anyone). Secondly here's the catch: Every doctor lies slightly. Most doctors don't prescribe spot-on medications , just ones that'll do the job and which pay them better. But don't think your doc is a golden-eyed business tycoon. They do their jobs very well. But to know if he/she is lying much out of range , consult a more experienced doctors or someone whose practice years exceed your doc. If your suspicion is right , you can even sue the doctor if you want lol. Just kidding. Go with personal opinions and choose one who has been actually effective for a larger no of people ( and I don't mean those paid smiley faces on billboards and light parties ).
It’s vital to note, however, that the prosecution of medical malpractice cases—in addition to having a high likelihood of failure—can be extremely expensive, stressful and time-consuming. It’s estimated that medical errors kill roughly 200,000 patients in the U.S. each year. Yet only 15% of the personal-injury lawsuits filed annually involve medical-malpractice claims, and more than 80% of those lawsuits end with no payment whatsoever to the injured patient or their survivors.

Breaking up with your doctor is not a choice most people take lightly, but there may come a time when it's the single best decision for you and your health. Some patients have had complaints that have been mounting over the years. Others decide to fire their doctor after one heated episode - perhaps because of a missed diagnosis like Della Casa, a disagreeable interaction, or a health concern that was dismissed.
The only change was policy in the state/federal regulations that has the pain doctors running because stupid idiots sell their meds to kids on the street and the government can do only 1 thing well and that is to over-react… So now we have all the pain mgmt. docs leaving private practices and scared to prescribe, forced to prescribe new formulations that cost a fortune as that is what the DEA says they should do – instead of cheap generics (because everyone will abuse the generics…..).

Still, in a few cases, it is possible to say that the doctor or other medical professional acted so poorly that their behavior was actually criminal. The most common instances are those in which doctors or other medical professionals issue prescriptions to patients in dosages that they know, or should know, could be dangerous. An example of such a prosecution was the doctor who prescribed pain medications to famed pop singer, Michael Jackson. Other examples of criminal misconduct by doctors include surgeons attempting procedures while impaired by drugs or alcohol, or so-called “pill mills” that prescribe medications in volumes that could only be used for illegal distribution.
The first step is a letter of demand, a letter sent by your lawyer to the doctor or health facility concerned, setting out your claim and the period in which the accused should meet it. Thereafter, getting a case to court can take up to four years. Accurate case data and hospital notes have to be gathered; records relating to the patient’s prior medical history, treatment at the hands of the suspected transgressor, and any subsequent treatment must be obtained. Then, lay witnesses must be found, expert witnesses briefed and court dates agreed on. In addition, both the patient’s medical condition and prevailing medical treatments have to be researched.
Suing a doctor for negligence requires much more than just filing a lawsuit in a Florida court. One of the prerequisites to filing a lawsuit against the doctor requires that you must first provide him or her with notice, indicating that you intend to file a lawsuit in the near future. A 90-day waiting period follows, during which the doctor may reject the claim outright, offer to settle the case, or ask to submit the case to arbitration.
Keep in mind, the standard of care differs from region to region and takes your doctor’s level of education and experience into account. As a result, a rural internist with a small private practice is not held to the same standard of care as a board-certified infectious disease specialist practicing in a cutting edge urban hospital. The well of knowledge and experience from which each doctor is drawing is vastly different.
Regardless of the type of medical test performed, if the results are not communicated in a timely and appropriate manner and the patient subsequently suffers harm, it may form the basis of a medical malpractice lawsuit. Harm, however, must be suffered, as a patient who suffers no injury after a failed communication will probably have no basis for a lawsuit.

Medical malpractice lawyers generally offer free initial consultations. Most rely on contingency fees, meaning that the patient never pays the lawyer. If the lawyer wins the case, the law firm takes a portion (usually about 1/3) of the award. If the lawyer loses the case, the lawyer usually is not paid, though the client may be on the hook for a few small costs.
Whether a judge will conclude the case involves professional medical negligence or simply “standard” negligence is sometimes difficult to discern ahead of time. For example, if a medical technician leaves a guardrail too loose on a patient’s bed, is that professional medical negligence or standard negligence? Different courts have answered similar questions in different ways.
Search for disciplinary sanctions. Visit your state’s disciplinary board to see if the attorney has been sanctioned in the past. Attorneys are sanctioned for ethics violations, such as disclosing client confidences or failing to respond to client emails. They are not sanctioned for failing to win cases, unless their performance was so low as to be negligent.
You're extremely confident in your opinion. Have you considered the possibility that neither of you is interpreting reality on an objective level and that you are actually harming your son based on that absolutism? Saying that it's 100% true seems a bit off unless you have a photographic memory, especially when you think that they believe every word of his and are doing the wrong thing.
Specifically, in arena of medical negligence, physician has duty to use that degree of care and skill which is expected of reasonably competent practitioner in same class to which physician belongs acting in same or similar circumstances. Unlike ordinary negligence cases, proving that a health care professional breached his or her duty of care involves showing what a reasonably competent health care professional would have done in a similar situation - and that your doctor didn't.
The concept of permitting someone to recover damages for injuries caused by someone’s lack of action or failure to do something was a revolutionary concept. Since its recognition as an action in tort, negligence has become a major source of very large jury awards. It is the root of all product liability cases. When people complain about our legal system and the outrageous verdicts being awarded nowadays, they are speaking about negligence.
That’s impossible. A reputable personal injury attorney will not charge you for an initial consultation. Michaels & Smolak will give you a free consultation. If we decide to represent you, we will charge you on a contingency fee basis, which is usually 1/3 of the net recovery we obtain for you, whether from a settlement or from a jury. Since the initial consultation is free, why wait? Contact us today for a free consultation.

At trial the jury found in favor of the doctor because even the plaintiff's expert couldn't say that the complications were the direct result of improperly performed surgery. Even properly done surgery of this type carried the risk of perforation, bleeding and infection. The plaintiff also alleged that the doctor failed to give her informed consent because he gave false information about his personal background. The trial court wouldn't allow the informed consent issue to be raised because in Wisconsin the law only required that physicians tell patients the material risks of proposed treatment. There was no affirmative duty to disclose professional background information even when asked.

The reason for negligence’s late recognition is because common law traditionally recognized only intentional torts; that is, it held parties responsible for injuries that were the result of intentional acts. It was irrelevant that the actor did not intend to injure anyone, much less the injured party, but it only needed to be shown that the actor intended the action that caused the injury. In these cases, evidence of who caused what injury was affirmative, direct, and fairly objective.

You may also have suffered financial loss as a result of your GP’s negligence if, for example, the time you have been required to take off work because of your injuries or illness has been prolonged due to the negligent act or omission of your GP. Suing your doctor may seem like a daunting prospect but it does not need to be with 1st Claims. We will support you every step of the way.
Sounds like a problem I had 5 months ago . I wakened in the morning to extreme pain ,it just got worse till I was doubled up in pain gasping out loud it got so bad I fainted several times . It died down slightly for a few hours then came back strong ,not one to rush to a doctor I suffered it for several days but it just got so bad I couldn’t look after my chair-bound wife and she ended up phoning the doctor who told me to come to the surgery. I practically crawled down the road after tests it turned out I was passing blood due to stones in the kidney -advice given keep drinking till you pass it . Anybody who has had this will know apart from cancer its the worst pain you can feel -no hospital journey to break it up – it took a WEEK for it to pass and the same 5 months for me to recover as I was as weak as water and thought “my number was up ” .
An average person does not know how to correctly file a report against a doctor who has committed medical malpractice.  Further complicating matters is the fact that each state has its own procedure for filing complaints against physicians.  Generally, you should file the complaint with your state’s medical board.  Each state has its own medical board and its own forms and requirements for filing complaints against doctors.

Despite that fact that the Constitution promises you the right to health care, no one has successfully sued the State for the non-delivery or lack of health care. Several test cases have concluded that, despite the Constitution and the Patients’ Rights Charter, the government has no absolute obligation to provide access to health care. Instead, the government is required to “progressively realise its obligations” to its citizens. In practical terms, this means, for example, that a patient who needs dialysis and cannot be treated because of a lack of facilities cannot sue the State.
This is often the most difficult part of medical negligence cases and even lawyers have trouble getting their heads around it sometimes.  You may be able to prove that a doctor did the wrong thing, but you also have to prove that what happened next was the result of that wrong thing and you have to prove that it would not have happened if the wrong thing had not been done.  Deciding whether or not this is the case involves both factual and legal issues and is sometimes very hard to do.  You really need a lawyer who is highly experienced in medical negligence cases to look at this for you.
The doctor's negligence caused the injury. Because many malpractice cases involve patients that were already sick or injured, there is often a question of whether what the doctor did, negligent or not, actually caused the harm. For example, if a patient dies after treatment for lung cancer, and the doctor did do something negligent, it could be hard to prove that the doctor's negligence caused the death rather than the cancer. The patient must show that it is "more likely than not" that the doctor's incompetence directly caused the injury. Usually, the patient must have a medical expert testify that the doctor's negligence caused the injury.

Many people mistakenly choose to file medical malpractice lawsuits because they are unhappy with the results of their treatment. However, a poor result -- even death -- does not always equate to malpractice. Medicine is an inexact science. Even the most routine procedure can result in complications both foreseen and unforeseen. There are no guarantees that any treatment, no matter how commonplace, will be successful. As such, it is possible -- and even common when it comes to some procedures -- for doctors to do everything right and still fail to obtain a good result.
While some medical errors are readily apparent, many times a serious hospital error is not immediately obvious. You may have a suspicion that you or your loved one has been harmed by a hospital’s substandard care. In most instances, you will need to have your medical records reviewed by independent medical experts to determine whether a preventable hospital error occurred.
At the law firm of Wocl Leydon, our skilled Stamford medical malpractice attorneys represent clients in a wide range of cases involving negligence on the part of doctors, hospitals and other health care providers. We are recognized throughout Connecticut for our legal excellence in these matters. In fact, other attorneys frequently refer their medical malpractice cases to us, trusting that we have the experience and resources needed to effectively handle these complex cases within the statute of limitations.
The negligence resulted in significant damages - Legal malpractice lawsuits are expensive to litigate. For a case to be viable, the plaintiff must show significant damages that resulted from the negligence. If the damages are small, the cost of pursuing the case might be greater than the eventual recovery. To be worth pursuing, the plaintiff must show that the outcome resulted in losses far in excess of the amount of legal fees and expenses necessary to bring the action.

Generally speaking, from a legal standpoint, you may need to evaluate whether the risk of being left without legal redress in the event of a medical mistake is worth the potential cost savings of having your procedure performed overseas. With such limited remedies available to patients, and the often lower standards of care in nations offering substantially cheaper medical treatment rates, the risks of medical tourism may far exceed the benefits.


Bipolar symptoms dont normally “go away ” without some mental help , either of drugs or as an outpatient in a hospital but as you say you have to be diagnosed first Bez to get treatment . Your doctor , unless he has degrees in psychiatry has not the qualifications to judge and must refer you to a specialist . If you are refused treatment there are many mental health charities that I can provide to take up your case . Go down to the surgery , kick up a fuss about it , at the very least it will get them thinking and get beyond the “SS” guard at the reception . I have on many occasions had to be strong in my communications with surgeries to get help both for me and my wife , I dont take no for an answer when it comes to health luckily the message sinks in and it has saved my life and my wife,s on several occasions. Get back and let me know how you get on Bez , I know about depression etc and also the serious effects it an have on your life .

In the private sector, many legal contracts of all kinds stipulate the use of mediation or arbitration in the first instance, so it is quite common. Typically, a retired judge or senior advocate presides over the matter. In mediation, he or she listens to both sides and assists the parties to reach a compromise. In arbitration, the presiding officer can impose a binding decision, and can decide whether compensation is due and if so, how much.
We often get asked the question whether an active-duty military service member can sue the United States. The short answer to this question is that it depends on the claim your bringing. The general rule is that under Feres v United States, a service member may not recover under the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) for claims which arise out of or in the course of activity incident to their service. Courts often refer to this as the Feres Doctrine. Whether your claim falls within the scope of Feres is a complicated legal question that usually requires the assistance of a lawyer. There is no clear cut answer on when a serviceman’s death, injury, or loss is “incident to service.” The words incident to service appear no where in the Federal Tort Claims Act, but have been interpreted into the FTCA by the United States Supreme Court.
If the prosecution and defense cannot agree on a settlement, the case will proceed to trial. Medical malpractice trials are almost always trials by jury. If a case does proceed to trial, and the losing party is unwilling to accept the jury’s verdict, they can appeal to a higher court. In some jurisdictions, they can also appeal the amount of a judgement in the same court.
A number of general practices seem to be having difficulty retaining GP’s but for all of them at one surgery to resign and not be replaced by permanent doctors is very unusual, although perhaps recruitment is under way. The NHS Primary Care Commissioning Group for your area is responsible for the provision of general practices sufficient for the needs of the population and for the proper management of the services, but these Groups tend to be difficult to contact and engage with. Local newspapers are sometimes able to get information and relay this to local residents and some PCCG’s will issue statements but they are not noted for their openness. Your PCCG might have a website giving information on the current position and what it is doing about it. There could be malpractice issues at the root of what has happened in your area. The NHS is a branch of national government so I suggest you contact your Member of Parliament as the person most likely to be able find out the facts, inform constituents, and press for early resolution of whatever problem has caused this situation to develop. Local councillors can also apply pressure but the NHS is not under any obligation to answer to them in the same way as it is accountable to MP’s.

Yet you actually believe that medical practices are going to continue to risk everything for nothing just because you think you can shame them into playing right into their enemies hands? Because courtrooms and juries across this land, are very quickly forcing doctors to see those patients who beg them to risk everything to relieve their pain as potential enemies and destroyers of everything they’ve spent a lifetime building. If just one out of a thousand patients turns into your enemy for profit, you loose half a lifetimes work, let 2 out of a thousand do it and your FINISHED. You wouldn’t risk your business or your financial future, betting on the sterling character of everyone that walks through your door, why should doctors be different? Newsflash!! Drug abuse (legal or otherwise) can destroy your life !! But let an unscrupulous lawyer tell you that he can not only give it all back to you, but make you a millionaire to boot, all you have to do is be willing to put that blame on somebody else… Well who ISN’T going to go for that deal? The number 1 cause of all drug abuse is IRRESPONSIBILITY, yet you think drug abusers wont jump at the chance to hold ANYONE but themselves responsible?
To discuss your potential medical malpractice claims with one of our compassionate Connecticut personal injury lawyers contact our law offices in Stamford or Bridgeport today. Our dedicated medical malpractice lawyers will provide a free initial consultation to help you evaluate whether you have a viable legal claim and explain your options for moving forward.
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Thomas J. Lavin, Esquire, has been practicing law in New York since 1984. His practice focuses primarily on protecting the rights of the injured. Mr. Lavin graduated summa cum laude from Iona College in 1979 and earned his Juris Doctor degree from St. John’s University School of Law in 1983. The Law Offices of Thomas J. Lavin have provided legal help to more than 5,000 accident victims in thirty years of personal injury practice.
Medical malpractice lawsuits, like all civil cases, can only be brought within a certain period of time. That deadline is set by a law known called a “statute of limitations.” Every state has passed these kinds of laws, with different deadlines according to the kind of case you want to file. In almost every state, there is a dedicated statute of limitations that applies to medical malpractice cases.
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at no point did I mention that he does not believe that the medicine is not in my best interest. He claimed he did not know about the illness which is absurd and insulting to the intelligence. I have been around doctors plenty, and know more than the average person about digestive problems. I have seen doctors in the US and overseas. no one, not even the newbies said that they do not know about it. everyone knows it and knows the treatment for it. That is why I am extremely upset about being turned away and want him to be held accountable for not treating a patient. I could careless about getting money out of him and if I do I would put most of to research of this disease. About the comment about going out on a limb, the medications I have do not contain any narcotics or any substance that is addictive or gives any kind of high. I also brought a bag with all my medications. that been said, am I to understand that since there are sting patients a guy like me who has blood coming out of his body every day should go untreated or even checked on the very least. That does not make any sense. These has to be a law somewhere that protects people from that kind of behavior.
Medical malpractice cases are inherently complex and difficult to prove. There is no law that says, “If this doctor failed to do X procedure in Y amount of time, negligence has occurred”. You’ll need to find a lawyer with experience in medical malpractice cases (these lawyers typically have a medical expert available to look into potential cases) to look at the facts of your case, and determine if all the required legal and medical elements are there, to justify pursuing a medical malpractice lawsuit.
The philosophy of our law firm regarding damages is simple: obtain the maximum monetary recovery possible for each client. We accomplish this by relying on our decades of experience to diligently prepare our cases for trial and aggressively advocate for our clients. Our financial resources, technological tools and access to outstanding experts in various fields allow us to provide top-notch representation to our clients.
Many states limit the amount a plaintiff can recover in a medical malpractice lawsuit. For example, subjective damages like “pain and suffering” might be capped at $250,000. In a state with that kind of cap, you wouldn’t be able to recover more than $250,000 plus any medical expenses, lost wages and other “concrete” damages caused by the malpractice.
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