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Medical Malpractice Insurance Singapore | Medical Malpractice Jury Selection

Somewhere between 210,000 and 400,000 Americans die each year due to a medical error (James 2013); it is now the third leading cause of death in the United States (Makary 2016). Many more sustain injuries that leave them with lifelong disabilities. Moreover, a recent national survey revealed that 21% of Americans have personally experienced a medical error, and 31% have been involved in the care of a family member or friend who did. As discussed above, tort reform measures may be effective in limiting the number and success of malpractice lawsuits, but don’t necessarily address the underlying issue of the malpractice epidemic in America.


The third element that must be established to sue NHS hospitals and doctors in a clinical negligence / medical negligence case is damages, ie the amount of compensation the patient should receive. The amount of damages will depend on a variety of factors, the most important of which are the patient’s pain and suffering and the financial loss the patient has incurred and will incur.
Valid observation!!! Big time… as someone who survives with chronic pain it is ultimately and solely my responsibility to manage self control. And if I don’t I have no one to blame but myself. I’ve read stories and have watched documentaries about people and families blaming Doctors I absolutely do not agree unless a doctor ihas history and is “well aware” the patient has an addictive type personality or does not make the patient aware of the addictive risk to the meds.,which that does not happen! I lost a friend to an overdose six years ago,(a R.N. who knew better!!) never once did I entertain the thought the doctor was responsible, No disrespect to those who have addictions but I’ve gone to the E.D. for help in the past before my surgery where they were so kind as to give me a shot of Gods knows what,I don’t remember asking or caring. It absolutely relieved me of my pain but I feared and hated that feeling so much. Its hard for me to understand who would want to live with that scary feeling everyday all day long. Doctors intentions when giving us medicines is to help us, don’t let them be the scape goats to your weaknesses, if you get addicted its your fault and you know it your fault. Own it,be accountable and get help. Put blame where blame is due. I’m just saying…..
^ William M. Sage, M.D., Margaret Thompson, Cynthia Gorman, Melissa King. [ The Jury's Still Out: A Critical Look at Malpractice Reform], Center for American Progress, June 12, 2008. From the study, "There is no nationwide crisis [...] Malpractice is wrongly blamed for rising health care costs in the United States...Experts have found little correlation between malpractice claim increases and malpractice premium increases. "
The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom decided in 2018 that the duty of care extended to information given to patients by clerical staff. A patient at Croydon Health Services NHS Trust's emergency department suffered severe brain damage having been given misleading information by staff at reception. He was told that he would be seen by a doctor in four or five hours and left the hospital, when actually he would be seen inside 30 minutes by a triage nurse.[8]
The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship. If we do not win, you will not be responsible for attorney's fees, court costs, or litigation expenses. If you do win, these expenses and unpaid medical bills will be taken from your share of the recovery.
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The negligence resulted in significant damages - Legal malpractice lawsuits are expensive to litigate. For a case to be viable, the plaintiff must show significant damages that resulted from the negligence. If the damages are small, the cost of pursuing the case might be greater than the eventual recovery. To be worth pursuing, the plaintiff must show that the outcome resulted in losses far in excess of the amount of legal fees and expenses necessary to bring the action.
We consider all cases on a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA), also known as a No Win No Fee agreement. This means that if you are not successful in pursuing your claim, we will not charge you any of our base legal costs. If we are successful with your claim, we submit the costs which we have incurred in pursuing the claim to the defendant/s and or their insurers. We are also entitled to charge a success fee, which will be deducted from your recoverable damages at the end of the claim. However, we can offer a competitive success fee and our aim will always to beat a success fee offer by any other firm. This means that we aim to beat the terms offered by other law firms and you will receive more of your compensation.
Lest we forget about the wives and families who have to sit back and watch their loved one disintegrate into nothing right in front of their eyes and not be able to do a thing about it. Maybe the doctor could just stop calling it in for a year after having seen that patient only one time in that year. Oh did I mention it was 120 pain killers a month with valium on top of that.

In this case a surgeon was sued by his patient following complications from a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (gall bladder removal). Before the procedure he explained the risks of the surgery to her, and she also asked him questions about his experience and success rate with the procedure. She asked additional questions about whether he had ever been sued for malpractice or had any action taken against his medical license. He answered no to both questions and added that he had an almost perfect success rate with the surgery. Well, bad things happened. The patient suffered a perforated intestine and an infection. She later found out that the doctor had lost a patient during this same procedure, and that he was disciplined for the board as a result of that case.
With the exception of a small minority of cases, the Florida medical malpractice statute of limitations is a hard and fast rule. Consequently, if you fail to file a claim or lawsuit for medical malpractice within the allotted time frame, you will be precluded from ever seeking monetary damages in your case. If you suspect that you sustained an injury or illness as a result of doctor negligence, you should contact the medical malpractice lawyers at Dolman Law Group as soon as possible.

A study by Michelle M. Mello and others published in the journal Health Affairs in 2010 estimated that the total annual cost of the medical liability system, including "defensive medicine," was about 2.4 percent of total U.S. health care spending.[53] The authors noted that "this is less than some imaginative estimates put forward in the health reform debate, and it represents a small fraction of total health care spending," although it was not "trivial" in absolute terms.[53]


Medical tests can be divided into two broad categories: diagnostic tests and screening tests. Diagnostic tests are administered to patients who exhibit signs of a disease or condition, such as a woman with a lump in her breast or a man with pain and pressure in his chest. Screening tests, on the other hand, are performed on patients who are considered to be at risk of developing a disease or condition – for example, routine mammograms for women and PSA screenings for men.
The second main component of your case will be the establishment of medical malpractice  damages. To sue the doctor, it’s not enough that he or she failed to treat or diagnose a disease or injury in time; it must also have caused additional injury. That means showing exactly how -- and to what extent -- the delay in the provision of medical care harmed you. This will also usually require the testimony of an expert medical witness.
Emotionally fragile patients. If a doctor knows that the patient is so distressed that he or she will refuse needed treatment, the doctor may not be required to get the patient's informed consent. For example, if a brain tumor is life threatening, but removal entails frightening risks like paralysis, it may be appropriate for the doctor to be vague in her description of the risks.
In the private sector, many legal contracts of all kinds stipulate the use of mediation or arbitration in the first instance, so it is quite common. Typically, a retired judge or senior advocate presides over the matter. In mediation, he or she listens to both sides and assists the parties to reach a compromise. In arbitration, the presiding officer can impose a binding decision, and can decide whether compensation is due and if so, how much.
In the wake of a medical malpractice accident, you should hire a personal injury attorney so he/she can determine if somebody negligently provided medical care to you and who can determine what injuries were caused as a result. If a personal injury attorney determines that medical malpractice did occur, a lawsuit can be filed. One of the most important things that you can do is to take pictures of any things that don't look right- such as cuts or abrasions. You can also gather all hospital records, request more medical documentation from a hospital and research a doctor's medical track record. Keep a journal to record the medical malpractice incident, your injuries and follow-up care.
The terms negligence and malpractice are often used interchangeably. Strictly speaking, negligence is a failure to “exercise the care that a reasonably prudent person would exercise” in similar circumstances. Medical malpractice, according to Andre Calitz, the chief operating officer for personal injury law practice Joseph’s Incorporated in Johannesburg, is an evaluation of conduct measured against a standard of medical care established by the medical fraternity.
The doctrine of contributory negligence eventually evolved, in some states, into a system of comparative fault that permitted recovery on a completely relative scale. Thus, in an accident one could be 90 percent at fault for one’s own personal injury and still sue to recover the 10 percent of the damages suffered that were caused by the other party.
Regardless of how much you want to be the one selected to do the procedure, that's the patient's choice not yours. I think it's smart to look into a physician's background before selecting them to do surgery. I would want to know how much experience you have or if there had been malpractice issues. Patients are the ones paying and taking the risks. They get to decide how much risk they're willing to take -not the physician. If you refuse to answer the questions, which I do believe is your right, then it lets the patient decide what to do next - either get on the medical board website and see if anything has been reported, talk to more people, find another physician who doesn't mind answering the questions, etc.
The concept of medical responsibility is historically entrenched, with first mentions dating to the fabled Code of Hammurabi, which famously established the "eye for an eye" maxim. The code arguably offers the founding statement of medical malpractice law, reading “If the doctor has treated a gentlemen with a lancet of bronze and has caused the gentleman to die, or has opened an abscess of the eye for a gentleman with a bronze lancet, and has caused the loss of the gentleman's eye, one shall cut off his hands." Millennia later, "lancet" would become synonymous with the of concept medical responsibility in highbrow intellectual communities, and synonymous with medical malpractice itself. A famed British medical journal, The Lancet, borrows its name from the ancient code's provision. Britain would unwittingly spearhead efforts to legislate medical malpractice, establishing nomenclature and court decisions that would go on to become the ancestors of modern malpractice law.
Based on these findings, you should now file a report with the Texas Medical Board. Lodging your complaint doesn’t mean that you will receive any compensation, but it is a necessary step if you want to make sure that your doctor is investigated for his or her actions. As a result of any disciplinary action that follows on the investigation, the doctor may be suspended from practice, thereby protecting other people from malpractice.

If you signed an indemnity or disclaimer during admission to hospital or for a particular procedure, you may have waived your right to hold the medical practitioner, hospital or hospital staff liable. However, the law in this regard is very complex and you may still be able to claim in certain circumstances even if you did sign an indemnity or disclaimer.

It doesn’t matter that “addiction” can be either physical or psychologic and that there is no reliable way to determine when addiction occurs. Tick’s bill doesn’t define addiction. It also doesn’t matter that people can get addicted to pretty much anything … alcohol, illegal drugs, porn, gambling, even collecting Cabbage Patch Kids. Tick’s bill only cares about those evil doctors. Beware internet service providers, you could be next on the list if your subscribers get addicted to the internet.

If the injured patient is able to prove – through qualified expert testimony – that the doctor committed an act of medical negligence, then the patient has satisfied the first step of proving a malpractice claim against the doctor. However, the injured patient must also be able to show that the doctor’s negligence resulted in certain injuries or damages.
What if a patient feels mistreated after the completion of therapy? Example: patient seeks contact with therapist after some new issues surfaced and being told he can't contact therapist because it would create a vortex in space-time which would subsequently swallow the entire universe (or something...) Threatening a person recovering from anxiety with law suit for trying to contact therapist seems heavy handed in the case when patient is just trying to find a solution and understand what's happening.
In many jurisdictions, a medical malpractice lawsuit is initiated officially by the filing and service of a summons and complaint. The parties subsequently engage in discovery,"[2] a process through which documents such as medical records are exchanged, and depositions are taken by parties involved in the lawsuit. A deposition involves the taking of statements made under oath about the case. Certain conversations are not discoverable due to issues of privilege, a legal protection against discovery,[4] but most conversations between the parties and witnesses are discoverable.
My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld

Incidentally, even when I was one week out of school if a patient asked when I graduated I told them the truth. Early on I did see an occasional look of fear at learning I was a newbie, but none of them asked for someone else. However, if they had asked for someone else that would have been their right and I would have respected their wishes. It's their money, their body, and their decision.
What are the early signs of pregnancy? Some people may know they are pregnant soon after they have conceived. Others may not be so sure, as signs of early pregnancy can be very similar to premenstrual ones. Missing a period is the most significant symptom, but there are other ways to tell if you might be pregnant. This article looks at 12 early signs. Read now
Doctors must abide by what is called “the duty of informed consent”. This means that a doctor is obligated by law and by professional ethics to warn patients of all known risks of a procedure or course of treatment. If a patient who had been properly informed of risks and potential side-effects would have elected not to proceed, the doctor MAY be liable for medical malpractice. Similarly, if the patient is injured by the procedure – or during the course of treatment – in a way that the doctor should have warned could happen but didn’t, the doctor may be liable for medical malpractice.
Typically, nurses, medical technicians, and support staff are hospital employees. As long as the employee was doing something job-related when he or she caused an injury to a patient, the patient can usually sue the hospital for resulting damages. For example, if a registered nurse (R.N.) employed by the hospital injects the wrong medication into an IV "push," and the patient ends up suffering harm as a result, then the hospital could probably be considered liable for the R.N.'s mistake.
The first step is a letter of demand, a letter sent by your lawyer to the doctor or health facility concerned, setting out your claim and the period in which the accused should meet it. Thereafter, getting a case to court can take up to four years. Accurate case data and hospital notes have to be gathered; records relating to the patient’s prior medical history, treatment at the hands of the suspected transgressor, and any subsequent treatment must be obtained. Then, lay witnesses must be found, expert witnesses briefed and court dates agreed on. In addition, both the patient’s medical condition and prevailing medical treatments have to be researched.
IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you go to AttorneyPages.com and retain an attorney to represent you.
^ Faulty Data and False Conclusions: The Myth of Skyrocketing Medical Malpractice Verdicts, Lewis L. Laska, J.D., Ph.D. and Katherine Forrest, M.D., M.P.H. Commonweal Institute, October 6, 2004. From the report, "The premise that medical malpractice awards have been rising dramatically in the United States in recent years, driving up the cost of healthcare and forcing physicians out of practice, is not supported by relevant evidence."
While both doctors in the above example should be able to diagnose the flu or pneumonia with relative ease, it would be more difficult to argue that the rural doctor was negligent for missing a diagnosis of some type of exotic disease usually only seen in people from foreign countries. On the other hand, the big city infectious disease expert would likely be negligent in not making the same diagnosis.

Duty of care was established not with patient's rights in mind per se, rather it was founded in, as worded by historian Harvey Teff, "the mystique of medicine and the strength of its professionalization.” The common layperson can not and will not comprehend the intricacies of medicine, so no objective standard may be set by non-medical professionals.
Thomas J. Lavin, Esquire, has been practicing law in New York since 1984. His practice focuses primarily on protecting the rights of the injured. Mr. Lavin graduated summa cum laude from Iona College in 1979 and earned his Juris Doctor degree from St. John’s University School of Law in 1983. The Law Offices of Thomas J. Lavin have provided legal help to more than 5,000 accident victims in thirty years of personal injury practice.
I'm on my 4th Psychiatrist in the same practice over the past several years. I've been diagnosed with severe anxiety, manic depression, Bipolar and even ADHD. I also see a therapist in the same office who actually happens to be a Dr., 2 of the Psychiatrists were not actual MD's. they were associates. The therapist is the reason I keep going back though, he is helpful and doesn't always agree with the medications I've been prescribed. They even had me go through 6 1/2 weeks of TMS treatment, 45 minutes a day 5 days a week.

Why is the statute of limitations deadline so important? If you try to file your claim after the deadline has passed, the health care provider you're trying to sue us sure to make a motion to dismiss the case, and the court is certain to grant it -- unless there's a reason to extend the deadline as it applies to your case, including the exceptions we've discussed in this article.
To discuss your potential medical malpractice claims with one of our compassionate Connecticut personal injury lawyers contact our law offices in Stamford or Bridgeport today. Our dedicated medical malpractice lawyers will provide a free initial consultation to help you evaluate whether you have a viable legal claim and explain your options for moving forward.
Cavendish ruled that a physician could be held liable if and when they harmed a patient as a result of negligence while stipulating that a physician who diligently adhered to the standard of care would not be liable even if he accomplished no cure. A legal precursor to expert testimony came in 1532, when a law passed under the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, requiring the opinion of medical men to be taken in cases of violent death. In 1768, Sir William Blackstone penned Commentaries on the Laws of England, in which he recruited the Latin term “mala praxis” to describe the concept of professional negligence, or ‘tort' in modern parlance. Blackstone noted that mala praxis “breaks the trust which the party had placed in his physician, and tends to the patient's destruction.” The proper term of ‘malpractice' was coined sometime thereafter, deriving from Blackstone's work.
We'll see what ends up happening on retrial, but I thought this was an interesting emerging area of law. What if the issue wasn't technical incompetence? How much "personal background" should a doctor have to tell a patient before treatment can begin? Medical school grades? Failure to pay income tax? Should doctors be required to disclose to patients the fact that they've been treated for mental illness themselves?
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