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Medical Malpractice Faq | Medical Malpractice Articles

If you are considering a medical negligence claim and you are thinking of contacting Been Let Down to discuss your claim, we would first arrange a consultation over the telephone; this initial call is free, and there is no obligation to proceed. During this phase of the claims process, we will take the time to listen to the details of your claim in detail.
In California, for example, recovery for non-economic damages are limited to $250,000. According to the Supreme Court of California, "noneconomic damages compensate the plaintiff for 'pain, suffering, inconvenience, physical impairment, disfigurement and other nonpecuniary damage [as per Cal.Civ.Code section 3333.2, subdivision (a)].' Section 1431.2, subdivision (b)(2) similarly defines noneconomic damages as 'subjective, non-monetary losses including, but not limited to, pain, suffering, inconvenience, mental suffering, emotional distress, loss of society and companionship, loss of consortium, injury to reputation and humiliation.'”[41] Tort reform supporters argue that states have enacted such laws in order to keep health care costs low, in addition to helping curb medical malpractice litigation. However, according to the Supreme Court of California, the state's non-economic damages caps are "not a legislative attempt to estimate the true damages suffered by plaintiffs, but rather an attempt to control and reduce medical malpractice insurance costs by placing a predictable, uniform limit on the defendant's liability for noneconomic damages."[42]
In some situations, a patient may not receive important communications due to clerical errors. In these situations, if treatment of a treatable medical condition is delayed, or made impossible because of the delay, that failure to communicate can form the basis for malpractice liability. In fact, this sort of claim is among the fastest-growing type of medical malpractice, with a quarter of all failure to diagnose claims stemming from failure to communicate claims.
I'm on my 4th Psychiatrist in the same practice over the past several years. I've been diagnosed with severe anxiety, manic depression, Bipolar and even ADHD. I also see a therapist in the same office who actually happens to be a Dr., 2 of the Psychiatrists were not actual MD's. they were associates. The therapist is the reason I keep going back though, he is helpful and doesn't always agree with the medications I've been prescribed. They even had me go through 6 1/2 weeks of TMS treatment, 45 minutes a day 5 days a week.
But, anon, a successful suit doesn't remove a bad doc from practice. Only a licensure action can guarantee that. Suing someone out of a need to punish them may accomplish little. The real purpose of civil suits is to make the plaintiff whole. I suspect even "punitive" damages, if they're ever awarded in malpractice suits, would be covered by insurance.
It is possible, however, to commit a criminal homicide based on wanton or reckless behavior. In other words, if someone acts with such disregard for the safety of others that death or serious injury is almost a given, this is often enough for certain types of criminal charges. However, doctors and other medical professionals are highly trained, very knowledgeable individuals. They are heavily regulated to prevent those with serious problems like substance abuse or mental disorders from causing harm. They are also under constant scrutiny and required to undergo continuing education to ensure that they are not engaging in techniques that could imperil a patient's life.
Not every medical error is preventable.  And despite taking every available precaution, you may still be exposed to medical error.  In the event you are harmed by a medical error, you may be concerned for your health, frightened by the possible consequences, angry at the mistake, or any combination of these and other powerful emotions.  In this state, you may not know what to do next or how to report the incident.  In the following article, InjuryBoard provides you with an easy to understand guide explaining what to do when you’re injured by a doctor’s mistake and how you can help prevent others from suffering in the same way.

During discovery both sides have an opportunity to force the other side to produce documents and other relevant materials such as medical records, tax returns, social security records, etc. They also have the opportunity to interview relevant witnesses under oath in a process known as a deposition. Prior to your deposition, we will work closely with you to ensure that you make the most effective presentation possible.

This may not be the case if you are suing for another’s injuries. For example, we often take and are successful in taking injuries due to medical negligence at birth or delivery of a baby. Many times, the mother, father, or both are active duty. Our active duty moms and dads sue for injuries that arise out of the baby’s original injury. For example, in many cases, the medical negligence on the baby will cause loss of consortium, incur attendant costs of care, and other damages. These types of cases are not barred by the Feres doctrine. If you have a case like this, contact us so that we can analyze the specific facts of the case and give you a better idea whether you may bring suit on behalf of your child for obstetrical or other negligence arising out of the labor and deliver.

Medical malpractice lawsuits, like all civil cases, can only be brought within a certain period of time. That deadline is set by a law known called a “statute of limitations.” Every state has passed these kinds of laws, with different deadlines according to the kind of case you want to file. In almost every state, there is a dedicated statute of limitations that applies to medical malpractice cases.
If you are considering a medical negligence claim and you are thinking of contacting Been Let Down to discuss your claim, we would first arrange a consultation over the telephone; this initial call is free, and there is no obligation to proceed. During this phase of the claims process, we will take the time to listen to the details of your claim in detail.
The concept of medical responsibility is historically entrenched, with first mentions dating to the fabled Code of Hammurabi, which famously established the "eye for an eye" maxim. The code arguably offers the founding statement of medical malpractice law, reading “If the doctor has treated a gentlemen with a lancet of bronze and has caused the gentleman to die, or has opened an abscess of the eye for a gentleman with a bronze lancet, and has caused the loss of the gentleman's eye, one shall cut off his hands." Millennia later, "lancet" would become synonymous with the of concept medical responsibility in highbrow intellectual communities, and synonymous with medical malpractice itself. A famed British medical journal, The Lancet, borrows its name from the ancient code's provision. Britain would unwittingly spearhead efforts to legislate medical malpractice, establishing nomenclature and court decisions that would go on to become the ancestors of modern malpractice law.
What she did NOT DO – WEAN THE DOSE OF FENTANYL PATCHES DOWN FIRST…. This was a COLD SWITCH – and being a “legitimate patient” I never assumed a doctor would ever – ever do this without some significant discussion, the audacity of a doctor to do this – knowing the impact, and knowing I have a job and a family (twins and 3 older children) and that ALL of the discussion with this doctor was centered around NOT causing a negative impact to work / family life – is just impressive to say the least…
This answer is offered for informational purposes only. It is not offered as, and does not constitute, legal advice. Laws vary widely from state to state. You should rely only on the advice given to you during a personal consultation by a local attorney who is thoroughly familiar with state laws and the area of practice in which your concern lies. In the event that you have follow up questions, please post them directly on this site. This does not create an attorney-client relationship and the attorney does not read unsolicited emails. Thank You.
Medical malpractice court cases have been filed against specialists, and if your specialist caused you injury due to negligent care, you may be able to file a claim, too. Medical specialists are held to a higher standard than general practitioners because of their high skill level. Therefore, when a specialist breaches the acceptable standard of care and causes you harm, you can hold him or her accountable through a physician malpractice claim.
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Not true! There are thousands of physicians sued successfully every year without ending in the loss of their licenses or practices. Although your doctor will have to spend some time defending the suit, throughout the process he will most likely still be able to see his patients and conduct his life as normal. Furthermore, after the conclusion of the suit, he will most likely go back to treating his patients – albeit, hopefully, more carefully this time.
In order to take legal action against a medical doctor for malpractice, you cannot just simply file a lawsuit with the court. Rather, you must first send a notice to the doctor, indicating to him or her that you are planning to file a lawsuit for medical malpractice. After filing the notice, there may be a waiting period before the injured patient is eligible to file a lawsuit.
Although the laws of medical malpractice differ significantly between nations, as a broad general rule liability follows when a health care practitioner does not show a fair, reasonable and competent degree of skill when providing medical care to a patient.[2] If a practitioner holds himself out as a specialist a higher degree of skill is required.[2] Jurisdictions have also been increasingly receptive to claims based on informed consent, raised by patients who allege that they were not adequately informed of the risks of medical procedures before agreeing to treatment.[2]
Rather, the law only requires medical professionals to act according to the proper standard of care. If you have evidence that your doctor violated this standard when failing to diagnose your condition, then you may have a legitimate malpractice claim. Oftentimes, an expert witness will be called in to determine whether a medical professional did indeed violate his or her standard of care.
Another potential cause of action is intentional infliction of emotional distress. This is based on a doctor’s outrageous conduct that intentionally or recklessly causes a patient to suffer severe emotional distress. This must be beyond a mere slight as it must be something that would outrage society. The common law tort required a physical manifestation of injury, but most jurisdictions no longer require this element. This cause of action has been successful in some cases in which patients recorded their doctors performing medical treatment while mocking and ridiculing the patient to a serious degree.
The first medical malpractice cases in the United States centered around a breach of contract and not failure to adhere to a standard of care. This meant that the defendant physician made some sort of express promise to skillfully render care and obtain a good result. Failure to do so was grounds for a suit. Five years after George Washington's inauguration, the country saw its first recorded medical malpractice lawsuit. A man sued the surgeon who operated on his wife and caused her to die, despite having made promises to the two that he would operate skillfully and safely. This breach of contract case resulted in a plaintiff verdict and an award of 40 pounds.
To have a valid hospital negligence claim, it must be shown that the level of care provided to the victim fell below a reasonable standard. Additionally, a successful medical malpractice claim must prove causation. This means that the link between the substandard care and the victim’s injury or death must be clearly demonstrated. Due to the multifaceted and complex nature of medical malpractice claims, it is important to hire a lawyer with extensive experience and resources related to this area of law. A positive outcome often relies on the ability and knowledge of your legal team. At Hodes Milman, our lawyers have helped countless victims, and we can help you understand and assert your rights.
If you signed an indemnity or disclaimer during admission to hospital or for a particular procedure, you may have waived your right to hold the medical practitioner, hospital or hospital staff liable. However, the law in this regard is very complex and you may still be able to claim in certain circumstances even if you did sign an indemnity or disclaimer.

And don’t kid yourself. If you think that your doctor just made a mistake and that it won’t happen again – think again. Chances are, if he made a mistake with you, he very well could have done it before and will do it again. Don’t be dissuaded by your doctor’s apologies or his downplaying of your injuries. An apology won’t pay for your medical expenses, and it certainly doesn’t ensure that he realizes the full consequences of his negligible actions.


I think that success rates of surgeries for each doctor ought to be recorded and published on the internet and all malpractice suits and judgments against doctors ought to be there, too. This is not at ALL the same as a patient wanting to know personal information about the life of their shrink. Face it. Some surgeons botch surgeries over and over and others are great. I consider the cited case malpractice.
Medical professionals will not be negligent just because there was a better alternative for the care. To be negligent so that you (through your solicitor) can sue the NHS, the level of care needs to have fallen below the level expected of the average competent medical professional in the field. The question to ask when bringing a claim against a doctor or hospital is whether a reasonably competent doctor in the same specialty faced with the same situation could reasonably have acted in the same way. If this hypothetical doctor would have, then negligence cannot be established even if many or even most doctors would have acted differently.
Medical malpractice is the most common legal claim lodges against doctors. A medical malpractice claim arises when a doctor failed to treat the patient in conformance with the accepted medical standard of care and the patient suffered some injury as a result. The medical standard of care is the type of care that another physician in a similar community practicing in the same type of medicine would have provided within the same circumstances.
At my GP surgery I’m pretty sure half the battle is wether the receptionist thinks your exaggerating ! A few months back I caught flu from my daughter, after a week the fever, headache and severe cough hadn’t subsided. I have asthma so knew it was a good idea to call to be sure I didn’t have a chest infection. I managed to be granted a telephone consultation with the nurse who oodly prescribed a nose spray thinking the head pain was actually my sinus’s (never had sinus issues) a week on no change but the cough was horrific with all sorts coming up. Called again got a telephone consultation with GP, he prescribed a low dose of antibiotic an said it’s most likely viral. 1 week on after feeling slight relief I started feeling extreemly wheezy with not much change to the cough. The 2nd day I called I demanded to see someone as I couldn’t see how my chest could be Assesed over the phone. Then I got an appointment with the nurse at the minor ailments clinic(minor difficulty breathing) I was straight away placed on a nebulizer, my sats were low and nurse said I had pneumonia. A month later still not feeling quite right my asthma meds were increased. 1 month on again another course of steroids and then they agreed I probably should have an xray. 5 hrs late they call saying I need a ct scan but will have to be in a waiting list. All this caused me severe anxiety and when I saw a dr and broke down he literally made me feel a complete waste of time. Since I’ve felt awful but am too embarrassed to go back so have to hope this is all just anxiety. As soon as my referals through I’ll be leaving that surgery as I have zero confidence in them
Once a patient begins a clinical negligence / medical malpractice claim for compensation it is no longer possible to pursue a complaint under the NHS complaints procedure.  Using the NHS complaints procedure does not stop you from later pursuing a clinical negligence / medical malpractice compensation claim and in some instances it is advisable to make a complaint under the NHS procedure before commencing a clinical negligence / medical malpractice claim.

Emotionally fragile patients. If a doctor knows that the patient is so distressed that he or she will refuse needed treatment, the doctor may not be required to get the patient's informed consent. For example, if a brain tumor is life threatening, but removal entails frightening risks like paralysis, it may be appropriate for the doctor to be vague in her description of the risks.

Under NO circumstances is your doctor allowed to leak, alter, or otherwise use your medical information against you in retaliation for filing a malpractice lawsuit. There are severe criminal, civil, and judicial penalties for taking such illegal actions. For engaging in an act such as altering your medical records, your doctor could face anywhere from criminal fraud charges to the loss of his medical license.
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